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Messages - Tor Bejnar

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1
This graph shows the same [sad] story even better:
...
... especially knowing that the blue line (max) in 2017 will likely drop below the "21" (x1000 km3) line.  During recent years, melt has been in the rage of 19.5 (in 2010 and 2012) to 16.5 (2014), so less than 2,000 km3 remaining is a real possibility, but not a 'sure thing'.

I won't be particularly surprised if we have a record melt (20,000 km3 - the Arctic has been prepped for it) or a modest one (17,000 km3 - the High Arctic's short melting season makes it tough, even with thin ice).

[Yeah, my comment may belong in the melting thread - but this isn't a 'major' thread, so I don't expect Neven to get out his axe, but because of this note he might  :D.]

2
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: April 19, 2017, 07:54:58 PM »
The March 5 floe is definitely in Baffin Bay now, broken hearted, well, at least broken.  It was fun while it lasted.  I'm curious why it broke now. [my post #1111 - a duplicative milestone]

3
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: April 19, 2017, 07:31:28 PM »
The Lincoln Sea ("foot") bridge lost some of it's edge (or "cleaned up its act" or "got more space for the toes") sometime between 6 pm yesterday and noon today (probably GMT).  Along with some of the fast ice that grew on the bridge, some slivers (smaller than the March 5 floe) peeled off the bridge near the Ellesmere side.  You can contrast the edge with the image posted on April 16. (image from Polar View)

4
Policy and solutions / Re: Oil and Gas Issues
« on: April 19, 2017, 07:02:51 PM »
I don't really understand the graph. I have an understanding of what "rig count" means, but what is "rig count lag", and how do they project values into the future?  Production, it appears, is self explanatory.  (An internet search of "rig count lag" didn't help!)  If there was no "lag", would the green and blue lines be close to each other or would there be no future values, or both?
(Thanks in advance.)

5
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: April 18, 2017, 08:59:31 PM »
The 'last Arctic Ocean ice' to break off the Lincoln Sea bridge (that broke off about March 5) was in Kane Basin on April 14.
...

Exit, stage left.  The March 5 floe has now all-but-exited Nares Strait, depending on where you draw the line between Smith Sound and Baffin Bay. March 5 to April 18 = 44 days.  Curious that the previous identifiable floe we watched took 10 days in early February. (Screen shot from PolarView.)

6
Policy and solutions / Re: Oil and Gas Issues
« on: April 18, 2017, 06:19:11 PM »
cross post:  I thought this use of battery technology by gas-fired electricity plants interesting:
Edison, GE unveil new battery systems at California gas plants

April 17 (Reuters) - A major California utility and General Electric Co on Monday unveiled a first-of-its-kind battery storage system that will enable instant power output from a natural gas peaking plant to accommodate the state's changing electricity needs while decreasing greenhouse gas emissions.

The system, which was installed at two separate Southern California Edison "peaker" plants this month, will give the utility increased flexibility as the large amounts of renewable wind and solar power required by state mandates have made energy generation cleaner but far less predictable.

Peaker plants are small power plants designed to come online quickly when power demand is high, such as on a hot summer day. But they are also among the least efficient resources available to the utility.

The 10 megawatt batteries, which contain cells made by Samsung SDI, are capable of providing power immediately, eliminating the need for the plant to burn fuel in "standby" mode. Prior to integrating the batteries, the 50 megawatt plant would take about 10 minutes to ramp up to a desired capacity.


7
Glaciers / Re: Canadian Glaciers
« on: April 17, 2017, 09:00:43 PM »
Also from the NYTimes article, quoting Dr. Shugar:
“We may be surprised by what climate change has in store for us — and some of the effects might be much more rapid than we are expecting.”
The statement is a bit odd (i.e., "surprise" = "more rapid than we are expecting", duh), but it hits you coming and going.

8
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: April 17, 2017, 08:47:11 PM »
Very interesting, indeed, Bill.  (And for others: Bill took what I suggested [and ideas from others] and flew with it - my great idea ::) was under-developed when suggested  OR   if you don't like the changes, don't blame me ;D)

9
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: April 16, 2017, 10:42:29 PM »
The 'last Arctic Ocean ice' to break off the Lincoln Sea bridge (that broke off about March 5) was in Kane Basin on April 14.

Very nearly all the ice around it, all the way upstream to the Lincoln Sea bridge, is ice that froze in Nares Strait (or the little piece of Lincoln Sea below the bridge) since early February (when 1- the bridge formed and 2- virtually all the non-fast ice in the Strait flushed out within 10 days).

10
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: April 16, 2017, 10:36:08 PM »
I think that's out of the new ice in the "polynya" which is breaking up. If you look carefully you can see the outline of the original boot arch which is bigger.


Agreed. ...

Here are the DMI Sentinel images of April 6 & 12 showing this.

11
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: April 10, 2017, 07:14:44 PM »
Winds in Nares Strait will be out of the north, according to Windytv, all this week.  (Saturday's forecast, shown below, has the strongest winds.)  Although it has taken some 35 days to get 1/3rd of the way through, the "March 5" floe might be in Kane Basin (a 2nd third of the way) when the winds shift (predicted to be on Sunday).  I suspect all the ice in the Strait will not allow any floe to speed through as one did in early February, as it plays 'bumper cars' on its way south.

12
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: April 09, 2017, 03:04:42 PM »
The (relatively) lower temps are showing up on the DMI chart, nearing the mean for only the second time this year.
also, 2nd time since about day 255 last year (mid-Sept. 2016).

13
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: April 09, 2017, 01:31:48 AM »
About 3/24 the floe from the 'foot' bridge was opposite Petermann Fjord gong southward.  It was also there on 3/28 going northward.  It was there again yesterday (going south).

14
Arctic sea ice / Re: 2017 sea ice area and extent data
« on: April 07, 2017, 06:13:09 PM »
I'm curious about the effect Nares Strait is having on Baffin Bay.  Specifically, Kane Basin (and the entire Strait) has not had an effective ice arch all winter, so Nares has exported a lot of up-to-about-one-meter-thick (grown in Nares Strait) ice.  The volume (not thickness) of ice created in Nares Strait will be much greater than usual, as new ice with no snow cover is (virtually) continually being created in the northern parts of the Strait, and the first 10 or 50 cm grows much faster (in a given temperature) than the third.  And it is almost constantly being exported to Baffin Bay.  Other years, Nares Strait closes in January or February and gets flushed out in June. Thicker, obviously, but after a great deal of melting happens further south, and nowhere near as much ice area gets exported, in total.
Baffin/Newfoundland Bay Area from Regional Graphs page:

15
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: April 07, 2017, 05:55:12 PM »
cross post (there was some discussion about southern Baffin Bay ice in another thread, so I put this observation/question there):
I'm curious about the effect Nares Strait is having on Baffin Bay.  Specifically, Kane Basin (and the entire Strait) has not had an effective ice arch all winter, so Nares it has exported a lot of up-to-about-one-meter-thick (grown in Nares Strait) ice.  The volume (not thickness) of ice created in Nares Strait will be much greater than usual, as new ice with no snow cover is (virtually) continually being created in the northern parts of the Strait, and the first 10 or 50 cm grows much faster (in a given temperature) than the third.  And it is almost constantly being exported to Baffin Bay.
An edited and extended note can be found at
in the "2017 sea ice area and extent data" thread.

16
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: April 07, 2017, 05:52:14 PM »
I'm curious about the effect Nares Strait is having on Baffin Bay.  Specifically, Kane Basin (and the entire Strait) has not had an effective ice arch all winter, so Nares it has exported a lot of up-to-about-one-meter-thick (grown in Nares Strait) ice.  The volume (not thickness) of ice created in Nares Strait will be much greater than usual, as new ice with no snow cover is (virtually) continually being created in the northern parts of the Strait, and the first 10 or 50 cm grows much faster (in a given temperature) than the third.  And it is almost constantly being exported to Baffin Bay.

17
Policy and solutions / Re: Oil and Gas Issues
« on: April 04, 2017, 07:39:55 PM »
Bloomberg shows West Texas Intermediate is now above $50.  (Will it last?)
Apparently!

18
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: April 03, 2017, 08:28:26 PM »
What surprises me is the 1.2-2 m thick ice (according to the March 3 to 30 CPOM CryoSat-2 map Jim Hunt referenced [GreatWhiteCon]) in the western (still flowing, albeit slowly) part of Kane Basin and in Smith Sound.

19
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: April 03, 2017, 06:48:15 PM »
That "1 m" Nares Strait ice thickness was based on -30º C "constant for 2 months" (starting with basically no ice as most of the "old" ice was flushed out and no insulating snow [whose presence is obvious from MODIS images]).  Using DMI's FFD for 80N (an area that includes Kennedy Channel in Nares Strait, but is strongly influenced by the area north of 85N) between Feb. 1 and Apr. 1 [FDD=1250] , the formula from NSIDC
            Thickness (cm) = 1.33 * FDD (°C)0.58
returns 83 cm.   I do not know if it has been colder or warmer in Nares Strait/Kennedy Channel than at the North Pole, but this is certainly seems to me to be a reasonable estimate.

20
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: April 03, 2017, 03:55:45 AM »
On 3/28 the floe from the 'foot' bridge was opposite Petermann Fjord.  Now it it 40 km "upstream" (northwards), as of today's DMI Sentinel image.

The forecast winds this coming week show mostly winds out of the south, so the floe will likely stay where it is for a while.  I suspect the 'Nares Strait born' ice around it will prevent much movement northwards.  Further south, it does not appear a new arch is forming anywhere, so 'as soon as' the winds shift, (virtually) the entire Nares Strait should flush out again, as it did in early February.

So, how thick has the "Nares Strait born" ice grown during these two months?  If it has remained -30oC for these two months, it could be a meter thick!

21
Glaciers / Re: Barnes Ice Cap / Penney Ice Cap
« on: March 31, 2017, 08:13:49 PM »
For the record, there is some intermittent discussion of the Barnes Ice Cap on the Arctic sea ice changes: Natural variation vs human influence thread starting with Reply #182.

22
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: March 31, 2017, 06:17:34 PM »
This is pancake ice on Lake Michigan, but it too would look smooth from a satellite's perspective, and (even if thickened to 93 cm) I wouldn't be tempted to play ice hockey on it! 

(from today's Earth Science Picture of the Day)

23
The rest / Re: The Trump Presidency (was "Presidential Poll")
« on: March 31, 2017, 01:55:34 PM »
Last night on MSNBC (probably on Rachel Maddow) someone talked about "the trail of dead Russians".  (I was only half listening so I don't know what was said.)

24
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: March 30, 2017, 08:26:43 PM »
The Arctic Penguin (PIOMAS) doesn't agree with DMI (at least as to the relation of 2016 ice volume to other years).

25
...
Keeping it simple: there are no "tipping points" for a simple chunk of ice, however large it may be such as the Barnes ice cap: it's not a complex system, there are no positive feedbacks, and it melts linearly to the amount of energy/heat you apply to it.

It isn't a "simple chunk of ice". (My bias is geology.)  It has glaciers coming off of it (source of ice loss) and it snows (source of ice gain), among other influences. 

According to the Canadian Glacier Inventory Project:
...
Many studies have shown that recession has been taking place for centuries, especially in the south and west, but the recession has not been uniform along the margin
...
All research suggests that should continued warming take place, shrinking of the Barnes Ice Cap will accelerate
...
The Ice Cap’s configuration was reached approximately 5000 years B.P., and further evidences indicate some parts of the ice cap had readvanced just 100 years ago
 ...
Field studies in the early 1950s found that all of the Ice Cap’s winter accumulation is usually melted in the summer, and the Ice Cap is maintained close to equilibrium through the formation of superimposed ice (Bell and Jacob, 1997). [superimposed ice = frozen melted snow]
...


30-some years ago I was led to believe that AGW might cause so much more high-latitude winter precipitation that Arctic glaciers would expand.  It turns out that it does snow more, but that this extra snow is almost always more than offset by increasing melt.

In Washington, glaciers formed on Mount St. Helens after she blew her top.  Under the right conditions, glaciers can still thrive.  (But it'll continue to get rarer and rarer.)

26
Policy and solutions / Re: Oil and Gas Issues
« on: March 30, 2017, 05:29:41 PM »
Bloomberg shows West Texas Intermediate is now above $50.  (Will it last?)

27
Consequences / Re: 2017 ENSO
« on: March 30, 2017, 04:38:58 PM »
Climate Prediction Center - National Centers for Environmental Prediction - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - cpc.ncep.noaa.gov remains bullish on El Niño appearing this year.  Of course "bullish about the future" is different from El Niño has arrived.

Monthly:


28
...
The concept of "tipping point" does not apply to the Barnes ice cap.
...
I say it does!  The ice cap wasn't melting faster than it was expanding for a very long time, and now it is.  (And what caused approximately 100% of this change, I'm sure, is AGW.)

What I attempted to communicate earlier is that changes in forces (e.g., CO2) within a system (e.g., the icy Arctic) affect different parts of the system (sea ice, ice caps) differently.  Some things are like a canary in a coal mine - are affected obviously and quickly by certain changes - and others are not apparently affected.  Ice caps are affected less than (or more slowly than) sea ice by AGW.  (But a volcano erupting under an ice cap will melt more ice than a similar volcano erupting under the CAB.)

As to figuring out what non-AGW variability is affecting Arctic sea ice, there is "weather" - functionally good-for-melting seasons vs. good-for-keeping-ice-around seasons.  The generic AGW conditions were similar, but the Arctic responses in 2007 and 2012 were very different from 2013 and 2014.  If an 'average' season is half-way between these two pairs, what metric would one use to derive percentages (low points, high points, area, volume, some combination???)?  My biggest problem with this approach is that weather patterns are changing because of AGW.

29
...
If the first X varied naturally for thousands of years without destabilizing the ice sheet and only when humans added the second X was the ice destabilized, the ice loss is 100% due to to human warming.
I don't want to defend Ding et al.  But I do want to defend Peter.

2X 'obviously' exceeded some tipping point with relation to the Barnes Ice Sheet.  A single X could have had little noticeable affect. 

Separately, a single X (according to Ding et al) affects Arctic ice about as much as does AGW.  Although Arctic ice and Barnes ice are affected by most of the same forces, there are differences in degree (winds at altitude vs winds at sea level, insolation varies with latitude, ocean currents [huge difference]), so the affect of any one change could easily affect the response of the two icy entities differently.

I, too, question (the unread by me) Ding et al.  There were driftwood studies and Arctic Ocean ice shelves that suggest what has happened to Arctic ice these past 30 years is seriously unprecedented these past several thousand years.  I'd hazard a guess of a factor of 10, rather than 2.

30
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: March 29, 2017, 03:58:48 PM »
On March 27, DMI Sentinel shows the larger floe about 20 km 'south' of Petermann Fjord and on March 28 shows it to be opposite Petermann Fjord!  Windytv shows winds are currently from the south.  (I confirmed this ice movement with PolarView - no image included.)

We could try to guess which end of Nares Strait it will exit (first) and when!

31
Arctic sea ice / Re: Home brew AMSR2 extent & area calculation
« on: March 29, 2017, 02:53:24 PM »
The crack in the ESS is getting real wide. ...
Last year about this time (and basically for two months) winds were pushing Beaufort Sea ice toward the East Siberia Sea (ESS), opening the Beaufort early.  It is starting to look like the reverse may be happening this year.

This is probably premature, but would an ESS opening early or Beaufort Sea opening early affect the CAB differently?  (I'm thinking in terms of a "Laptev Bite"-like phenomenon).

32
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: March 29, 2017, 12:46:20 PM »
Thanks, iceman, for adding that important piece of the puzzle.

33
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: March 29, 2017, 01:09:58 AM »
The longer that bit of water remains ice-free, the less likely ice will re-cover it, as
1) the open water is prone to solar gain
2) the end of the (local) freezing season approaches.

I'm sure the surface re-freezing remains a possibility, though.  (It's still cold out there!)

34
Crossing the Arctic Ocean by Sail

It looks like they are skipping 2017 and will make a run for it in 2018.  Google Translate offers:
Sébastien, Benoît and Pierre-Yves are preparing for a new attempt to cross the Arctic Ocean by 2018. It's time to go, but this time, three! Benoît Lequin and Pierre-Yves, sailors and experienced technicians joined Sébastien. They have, among other things, crossed the Atlantic in both directions on a non-habitable catamaran of 6m.
 Sébastien, for his part, took advantage of his wintering on the east coast of Greenland to fine-tune the preparation in extreme conditions (hunting, testing equipment ...). Today, all three are involved in the construction of the new Polar gear as well as looking for partners

They've got a boatload of sponsors!  Their website includes a list of "Connections" (in French: "Liens") that includes (of many, this one in English) "The passive igloo project".

I imagine this thread will go back into hibernation...

35
Arctic sea ice / Re: I'm updating the ASIG next week. Any tips?
« on: March 28, 2017, 04:26:16 PM »
Seke Rob's graph for 2012 and before is still available! (And I've missed the updates ever since  :'() (edit:  it looks like he change from [or to] NSIDC to [or from] JAXA data in July 2002.)


36
Arctic sea ice / Re: Stupid Questions :o
« on: March 27, 2017, 09:14:43 PM »
Rox,
I wish you'd put "Best" within quotation marks, or even replaced it with "A geologically proven".

I've got the time, do you?   :)

(In high school I was told the earth was 3.5 billion years old and I finished university when it was deemed to be 4.5.  [It's now 4.54.]  My father went to college when many said it was only 2.5 or 3 and my grandfather was among those who 'settled' the Earth's age [that is, calmed down the rapidly increasing age] as part of the "Committee for the Determination of Geologic Time")

37
Policy and solutions / Re: Oil and Gas Issues
« on: March 27, 2017, 04:25:21 PM »
Oil prices have been bouncing around $50 for two years: the current low oil price in 5-year context (from Bloomberg).  (This is for "CL1.COM WTI Crude Oil (Nymex)" [as seen on previous graphs] or 'West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil'.)

38
Permafrost / Re: Arctic Methane Release
« on: March 26, 2017, 08:46:25 PM »
I recall a winter in the 1990s where Upstate New York (Adirondack Mtns., specifically) experienced normal mid-winter cold, but the usual snow cover was completely missing.  Many municipal water pipes buried 6 feet [1.8m] down (I think, but maybe only 4' - 1.2m) froze and broke, whereas during all other winters with some snow cover, they were fine. 

About 1970 (in northern New Mexico) we had some extreme cold (down to -32F [-26C]) (-5 to -10F [-10 to -20C] were normal extremes for winter's coldest nights) that killed many fruit trees where there was no snow cover but did no damage to ours as we had 4-6 inches [10-15 cm] of snow in our yard.

So yes, snow cover matters!

39
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: March 26, 2017, 08:15:02 PM »
We've been told that DMI's 80N temperature is north-pole weighted, so the NP insolation after March 20th affects the reported temperature disproportionately.

40
Arctic sea ice / Re: 2017 sea ice area and extent data
« on: March 26, 2017, 08:09:18 PM »
... the largest drop requires a loss of at least 77.4k/day (loss of at least 106.6k/day with single day values) ...
Normally I'd say such a rate of loss would be impossible, but I see that in 1979 the rate of loss was nearly this high.  Of course, there was much more southern ice available to melt back then (but less CO2 and H2O [and probably methane] in the Arctic air).

I want to express my continued profound appreciation to BFTV for posting these summaries.

41
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: March 26, 2017, 05:16:15 AM »
The (virtually) only pieces of Arctic Ocean ice in Nares Strait, the ones that broke off the "foot" bridge in Lincoln Sea on March 5 (or very shortly before) are now off Petermann Fjord. (roughly 120 km in 20 days - the previous identifiable floe went Nares' entire 500 km in 10 days!)  (From 3/23 Polar View.)

42
Arctic Background / Re: Barneo 2017
« on: March 24, 2017, 08:20:45 PM »
From that website's article on Barneo:
...
This year’s Barneo camp is located close to the North Pole at 89º24’N 135ºW, on a spot by the explorers named Zhalyuzi-2.
...
Also the aircraft proceeded to Zhalyuzi-2 where nine men were parachuted to the ice.
...
Temperature on site is minus 20 ºС and winds 3-4 m/s. Ice conditions in the area are good, the explorers say.
...
Cool way to arrive!  I wonder how thick the ice is.

43
Arctic sea ice / Re: Arctic Image of the Day
« on: March 23, 2017, 04:59:40 PM »
That image is addictive.  "Stop," I say, "Stop!  Turn it off.  Unplug it if you have to.  Stop the machine - it has gone too far!  We've lost too much sea ice already."  :'(

44
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2016/2017 freezing season
« on: March 23, 2017, 03:03:15 PM »
I doubt April PIOMAS data will provide "relief", but I'm sure it will indicate ASI volume increased during March.  It is still freezing cold in 80N territory, and will continue to be so for two more months.  (High Arctic ice growth during the NH spring is, of course, 'in competition with' melting in more southern areas and starts 'losing' [historically] in early April.)

I will watch the DMI graph to see how close the N80 temperature this year approximates (or not) the 'average' during the spring warmup.  The 2016 DMI graph shows that last year's spring warmed faster than the average until (approximately) day #155.  I won't be surprised with a repeat performance.

45
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: Wandel Sea / North East Greenland
« on: March 22, 2017, 11:58:29 AM »
Thanks, Wipneus, for the movie.  I was surprised when the several large "white" (old thick, I presume) floes got stuck on the northeastern corner of Greenland a couple weeks ago, as they had been 'nicely' tumbling along near the shoreline.  I wonder if the near-shore sea floor is shallow enough for floes to become grounded (especially if getting 'tumbled' as they flowed eastward), then the northern 'half' got sheared off because of the relentless pressure of 'the lemmings going off the cliff' (or 'ice being exported').

46
Arctic sea ice / Re: IJIS
« on: March 22, 2017, 02:26:34 AM »
Thanks, CognitiveBias.  You apparently have a bias toward cognitive ability!  :D

47
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: March 20, 2017, 06:56:54 PM »
At Nares' north end (through the clouds): the Lincoln Sea 'foot' appears to be forming an arch (that is, it's looking less flat footed).

48
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: March 20, 2017, 06:48:31 PM »
Yesterday's MODIS of lower Kane Basin shows the snow-covered ice moving en masse.  (Ignore the artifact!)

49
Greenland and Arctic Circle / Re: The Nares Strait thread
« on: March 20, 2017, 05:55:14 PM »
Ice has flowed southward about 20 km in two days, per these DMI Kane Basin Sentinel images.  There is not a bridge across Kane Basin anymore.

50
Arctic sea ice / Re: The 2017 melting season
« on: March 20, 2017, 05:31:06 PM »
Before we get too deep into melting season, would some of the more seasoned posters mind giving a handful of things they will be keeping an eye on over the next few months to judge how 'good' or 'bad' the melt is going?


5 fingers worth to start with? Not necessarily in order of time or importance!

1. How soon melt ponds and/or open water hang around in the Beaufort Sea this year. Things started very early last year:

http://GreatWhiteCon.info/2016/04/the-beaufort-gyre-goes-into-overdrive/

2. Ditto the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea

3. Ditto the Laptev and East Siberian Seas

4. How many (and how deep, warm, wet) spring cyclones spin around the Arctic Ocean

5. How the snow melt progresses across Canada, Alaska and Siberia

Next please!

I'd add:
  • state of the ice at the North Pole (watch MODIS)
  • area and extent of the various regions: comparing this year with past years (regularly click on the several Graphs Page tabs)
  • develop a specialty of your own! (weather? watching the web cams?, expeditions?, glaciers?)
  • watch ice export through (or melting within) Nares Strait (because I find this manageable) [P.S.: Nares export often starts in June.]

In 3 months we'll start looking at melt ponds in the Central Arctic Basin (CAB) and wonder when the Northern Passage and NW Passage will open. Oh yes, and when will the news media notice how bad things are getting.

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