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Author Topic: Arctic Methane Release  (Read 134091 times)

Gray-Wolf

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Re: Arctic Methane Release
« Reply #350 on: July 09, 2017, 07:24:49 PM »
I wonder if these 'bubbles' are the land based version of what have been measured off the Shore in the shelf Sea? Out there they are called 'chimneys' but is it the weight of water that allows them to form instead of the 'funnels' we see formed on land when they go POP?

The frightening speed of development ,off shore, may be a hint at just how fast the land based versions will grow?
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Theta

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Re: Arctic Methane Release
« Reply #351 on: July 17, 2017, 12:09:49 PM »
From the linked article....

"Besides the potential for rapidly forming sinkholes and explosions, these bulges also represent a significant addition to greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change. The release of methane from Siberian permafrost, a gas more than 25 times more potent than carbon in trapping heat in the atmosphere, rose from 3.8 million tons in 2006 to more than 17 million tons in 2013."

Given the rapid development of these methane bumps, combined with a nearly five fold increase of methane emissions in a mere 7 years, it sure looks like we are on an exponential trajectory for NH methane emissions, likely irreversible.

Any idea of what that would mean for the long term trajectory of earth's temperature?
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Shared Humanity

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Re: Arctic Methane Release
« Reply #352 on: July 17, 2017, 03:09:52 PM »
From the linked article....

"Besides the potential for rapidly forming sinkholes and explosions, these bulges also represent a significant addition to greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change. The release of methane from Siberian permafrost, a gas more than 25 times more potent than carbon in trapping heat in the atmosphere, rose from 3.8 million tons in 2006 to more than 17 million tons in 2013."

Given the rapid development of these methane bumps, combined with a nearly five fold increase of methane emissions in a mere 7 years, it sure looks like we are on an exponential trajectory for NH methane emissions, likely irreversible.

Any idea of what that would mean for the long term trajectory of earth's temperature?

There are certainly regular contributors here who could provide some insight but I am not one of them. My very layman's fear is that all of the trends related to the chryosphere are growth trends. A five fold increase in methane emissions in 7 years suggests a doubling interval of about 3 years.

We see similar growth trends in the rate of shelf melt in the Antarctic and the expansion of individual methane seeps in the ESS. Once a process is identified and we begin to monitor and measure, we see growth rate increases.

CalamityCountdown

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Re: Arctic Methane Release
« Reply #353 on: July 19, 2017, 04:44:27 PM »
From the linked article

Methane Seeps Out as Arctic Permafrost Starts to Resemble Swiss Cheese
Measurements over Canada's Mackenzie River Basin suggest that thawing permafrost is starting to free greenhouse gases long trapped in oil and gas deposits.
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/18072017/arctic-permafrost-melting-methane-emissions-geologic-sources-study

TerryM

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Re: Arctic Methane Release
« Reply #354 on: July 19, 2017, 06:56:15 PM »
From the linked article

Methane Seeps Out as Arctic Permafrost Starts to Resemble Swiss Cheese
Measurements over Canada's Mackenzie River Basin suggest that thawing permafrost is starting to free greenhouse gases long trapped in oil and gas deposits.
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/18072017/arctic-permafrost-melting-methane-emissions-geologic-sources-study


Thanks for the link.


I had no idea that such large releases of geologic methane were to be found so far north on this continent. S&S had found huge flares in the ESAS and issued warnings for that region, but as far as I know they hadn't determined if they were observing biologic or geologic methane, or a combination of both.


This doesn't bode well for the future.
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johnm33

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Re: Arctic Methane Release
« Reply #355 on: July 19, 2017, 07:54:26 PM »
"This doesn't bode well for the future."
I've looked for a bedrock map for both continents surrounding the arctic, this is all I've found. Makes me wonder just how far south the ocean will reach. A transect from banks to hudson would be interesting.