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Author Topic: Adapting to the Anthropocene  (Read 42448 times)

DrTskoul

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #200 on: January 25, 2017, 03:18:55 AM »
The linked article is entitled: "Why it matters that Human Poker Pros are being Trounced by AI", indicating that the performance of AI is accelerating on track with projections by Ray Kurzweil:

http://gizmodo.com/why-it-matters-that-human-poker-pros-are-getting-trounc-1791565551

Extract: "Given the early results, it appears that we’ll soon be able to add Heads-Up, No-Limit Texas Hold’em poker (HUNL) to the list of games where AI has surpassed the best humans—a growing list that includes Othello, chess, checkers, Jeopardy!, and as we witnessed last year, Go. Unlike chess and Go, however, this popular version of poker involves bluffing, hidden cards, and imperfect information, which machines find notoriously difficult to handle. Computer scientists say HUNL represents the “last frontier” of game solving, signifying a milestone in the development of AI—and an achievement that would represent a major step towards more human-like intelligence."


I hope future AI does not decide to save us from ourselves....
“You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts.”
― Richard P. Feynman

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #201 on: February 02, 2017, 03:36:25 AM »
The linked article is entitled: “Quantum computer 'construction plan' drawn up”.  This indicates that the 4th Industrial Revolution is heating up.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38811255

Extract: “The new blueprint, based on a modular design appears in Science Advances.

"We have produced a construction plan - a real blueprint to actually build a large-scale quantum computer," Winfried Hensinger, from the University of Sussex, told BBC News.”

See also:
http://www.nature.com/news/physicists-propose-football-pitch-sized-quantum-computer-1.21423
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #202 on: February 02, 2017, 08:09:43 PM »
The linked article is entitled: "ORNL researchers set record for quantum communications speed".  So not only are quantum computers becoming increasingly commercially available, but superdense coding will soon allow quantum communications to speed the Internet in a secure fashion.

http://www.knoxnews.com/story/news/local/2017/02/02/ornl-researchers-set-record-quantum-communications-speed/97365998/

Extract: " Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have set a new world record in superdense coding, a technique by which electrical particles are communicated, that could have far-reaching implications for internet users and cybersecurity.

For now, the development is largely experimental, but the group is working on ways to make their research applicable for internet and technology companies, and even the U.S. military. The United States Army Research Laboratory was a supporter of the project, according to the news release, and Humble said the development could be used to help the military more efficiently transmit information.

“This experiment demonstrates how quantum communication techniques can be integrated with conventional networking technology,” Williams said in the news release. “It’s part of the groundwork needed to build future quantum networks that can be used for computing and sensing applications.”"
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #203 on: February 14, 2017, 03:41:17 AM »
The linked article is entitled: “Google's “DeepMind" AI Understands The Benefits Of Betrayal“.  It appears that in the face of uncertainty, AI understands the benefits of both cooperation and betrayal.

http://www.iflscience.com/technology/googles-deepmind-ai-understands-the-benefits-of-betrayal/

Extract: “It’s looking increasingly likely that artificial intelligence (AI) will be the harbinger of the next technological revolution. When it develops to the point wherein it is able to learn, think, and even “feel” without the input of a human – a truly “smart” AI – then everything we know will change, almost overnight.

That’s why it’s so interesting to keep track of major milestones in the development of AIs that exist today, including that of Google’s DeepMind neural network. It’s already besting humanity in the gaming world, and a new in-house study reveals that Google is decidedly unsure whether or not the AI tends to prefer cooperative behaviors over aggressive, competitive ones.

Perhaps the scariest thing about all this is that its instincts are so unnervingly, well, human-like – and we know how following our instincts sometimes turns out.“
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

DrTskoul

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #204 on: February 14, 2017, 04:24:08 AM »
The linked article is entitled: “Google's “DeepMind" AI Understands The Benefits Of Betrayal“.  It appears that in the face of uncertainty, AI understands the benefits of both cooperation and betrayal.

http://www.iflscience.com/technology/googles-deepmind-ai-understands-the-benefits-of-betrayal/

Extract: “It’s looking increasingly likely that artificial intelligence (AI) will be the harbinger of the next technological revolution. When it develops to the point wherein it is able to learn, think, and even “feel” without the input of a human – a truly “smart” AI – then everything we know will change, almost overnight.

That’s why it’s so interesting to keep track of major milestones in the development of AIs that exist today, including that of Google’s DeepMind neural network. It’s already besting humanity in the gaming world, and a new in-house study reveals that Google is decidedly unsure whether or not the AI tends to prefer cooperative behaviors over aggressive, competitive ones.

Perhaps the scariest thing about all this is that its instincts are so unnervingly, well, human-like – and we know how following our instincts sometimes turns out.“


Until the point that the advanced AI perceives humans as a threat to earth and humanity..
“You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts.”
― Richard P. Feynman

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #205 on: February 17, 2017, 12:17:53 AM »
The linked article is entitled: “The strange link between the human mind and quantum physics”.  In a few decades, who knows how much progress will be made into this matter.

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20170215-the-strange-link-between-the-human-mind-and-quantum-physics

Extract: “The perennial puzzle of consciousness has even led some researchers to invoke quantum physics to explain it. That notion has always been met with skepticism, which is not surprising: it does not sound wise to explain one mystery with another. But such ideas are not obviously absurd, and neither are they arbitrary.

For one thing, the mind seemed, to the great discomfort of physicists, to force its way into early quantum theory. What's more, quantum computers are predicted to be capable of accomplishing things ordinary computers cannot, which reminds us of how our brains can achieve things that are still beyond artificial intelligence. "Quantum consciousness" is widely derided as mystical woo, but it just will not go away.

In a study published in 2015, physicist Matthew Fisher of the University of California at Santa Barbara argued that the brain might contain molecules capable of sustaining more robust quantum superpositions. Specifically, he thinks that the nuclei of phosphorus atoms may have this ability.

In 2016, Adrian Kent of the University of Cambridge in the UK, one of the most respected "quantum philosophers", speculated that consciousness might alter the behaviour of quantum systems in subtle but detectable ways.“
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

Archimid

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #206 on: February 17, 2017, 03:25:48 AM »
When I read articles like this I think of the Ptolemaic model. Here is an article that hints as how good the Ptolemaic model was:

http://www.polaris.iastate.edu/EveningStar/Unit2/unit2_sub1.htm

FTA:

As an indication of exactly how good the Ptolemaic model is, modern planetariums are built using gears and motors that essentially reproduce the Ptolemaic model for the appearance of the sky as viewed from a stationary Earth. In the planetarium projector, motors and gears provide uniform motion of the heavenly bodies. One motor moves the planet projector around in a big circle, which in this case is the deferent, and another gear or motor takes the place of the epicycle.



Ptolemy's model was as good as  Ptolemy's capacity to sense the world around him. Once better instruments came along (like the telescope), Ptolemy's model became obsolete for all but the most specific use, planetariums.

 My bet is that the edges of science are in the same situation. Things like dark matter, the observer effect and maybe the Higgs boson might be the limits of the models. When breakthroughs happen scientists can then sense beyond current capabilities and paradigms change.

I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #207 on: February 21, 2017, 12:12:11 AM »
The linked article is entitled: "Frontline: Fourth Industrial Revolution Takes Off, “Localizing” Site Selection Requirements".  The article indicates that the 4th Industrial Revolution will benefit US manufacturing more than any other country in the world, due to: (a) synergies of the adoption of new technologies (e.g. AI, robotics, IoT, smart manufacturing, smart products, etc); (b) proximity to the supply of workers at the high-end of the skill setsl and (c) proximity to consumer demand.

http://www.areadevelopment.com/advanced-manufacturing/Q1-2017/4th-industrial-revolution-localizing-site-selection-requirements.shtml

Extract: "The adoption of new technology — in what’s been called “the fourth industrial revolution” — will benefit the entire manufacturing ecosystem.

At the show, much of the “buzz” revolved around the software making possible what Brian Raymond, director of Innovation Policy for NAM calls “the convergence of the physical and digital worlds.”

With consumer demand for the “latest and greatest” continuing to drive that convergence, Raymond says the biggest challenge for the manufacturing industry will be helping eliminate the “mismatch” between the skills required by the new manufacturing and the supply of workers who have those skills.

As 2017 begins, Michelle Drew Rodriguez, manufacturing leader for Deloitte’s Center for Industry Insights, sees “limitless possibilities” for manufacturing: “Each of those trends is definitely poised for growth with the IoT, smart products, and smart factories. When you look at them combined, that’s really where the true value comes together.”

In Deloitte’s 2016 global manufacturing competitiveness survey of more than 500 executives, the U.S. came out on top as the country which is expected to be most competitive by the end of the decade. “The U.S. has been poised for a resurgence, within the past couple of years,” Rodriguez says. “We’re seeing that in the news, with both domestic and international companies investing more in the U.S., especially around manufacturing. Modern manufacturing is moving to increasingly advanced technologies and skill sets.”

With the Trump administration’s emphasis on creating jobs, some companies that had been looking at investments in Mexico are reconsidering the U.S., Matter says. He notes that the three largest third-party manufacturing firms “are all growing their operations in the U.S., and not only in the lower-cost U.S. markets. They’re expanding in places like Silicon Valley.” "
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson

AbruptSLR

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Re: Adapting to the Anthropocene
« Reply #208 on: March 23, 2017, 08:54:56 AM »
The linked article is entitled: "MIT researchers have developed a tree on a chip, with potential applications in robotics".  This could help make extremely small robots practicable.

http://tech.firstpost.com/news-analysis/mit-researchers-have-developed-a-tree-on-a-chip-with-potential-applications-in-robotics-367997.html

Extract: "The passive pumping on the device, which the researchers have dubbed as a “tree-on-a-chip” can potentially be used as actuators for extremely small robots, or nanobots."

See the associated research article at:

http://www.nature.com/articles/nplants201732
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
― Leon C. Megginson