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Author Topic: Ocean Temps  (Read 1325 times)

Tigertown

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Ocean Temps
« on: July 21, 2016, 03:19:47 PM »
Couldn't find a thread on this;apologies if I missed one.
A while back it was thought that warming had paused, only to find out that the oceans are a great heat sink and in particular, the Indian Ocean had stored 70% of the ocean heat gain. Now, everytime you look at an SST map or anomaly map, it will scare the daylights out of you, if even only you have a basic understanding of how science and weather and climate work together. If nothing else, you know  that the heat along with acidification is killing life off. Coral reefs are probably the most publicized of these. I guess there is need to make mention at least of deadly algae blooms on the rise. Besides all this, my biggest question is: How much more heat can be stored in the waters before it starts heating everything else to an even greater extent. I mean if the oceans have been a buffer up to a point, how bad would it be at the moment had that buffer not been available and how bad will it be without it when it reaches capacity or at least absorbs less heat. 950 F off the coast of Florida in one place a day or two ago making a new record. There have been hot spots all over, especially the S. Pacific. Hardly makes the news until a storm passes through one of these areas and "blows" up into a monster. Enough of my input; I submit now to greater minds.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2016, 04:36:47 PM by Tigertown »

Tigertown

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Re: Ocean Temps
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2016, 07:00:30 AM »
« Last Edit: October 30, 2016, 07:06:20 AM by Tigertown »

Bruce Steele

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Re: Ocean Temps
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2016, 08:03:56 AM »
Tigertown, I can't get your Yale /360 article link to load. Maybe you could try it again ?
Because we are a year + down the road from  2015 data I do think some of that heat has moved from the Western pacific oceans back into the atmosphere via our recent El Niño .  Also expect Western Pacific heat to rebuild until the next El Niño , my expectation anyhow.

johnm33

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Tigertown

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Re: Ocean Temps
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2016, 05:19:28 PM »
Thank you johnm33 for fixing that link. I will be on the lookout for more recent research. I have read in the last couple of days that some of this warmer water is ending up in Antarctica via ocean currents and accelerating bottom melt there. As the Yale article said, the heat took years to build up and when and if heat is discharged it will take a long time.

Tigertown

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Re: Ocean Temps
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2016, 06:57:03 AM »
Article here focuses mostly on the effects on sea life from oceans warming.


http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/09/oceans-warming-global-environment-climate/
« Last Edit: October 30, 2016, 07:05:12 AM by Tigertown »

Tigertown

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Re: Ocean Temps
« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2016, 02:43:06 AM »
Well, I promised to look for more updated articles concerning the oceans and heat storage. It's funny how you can google something every imaginable way and it never shows up, but then out of the blue as I was looking for something else;  VOILA!
Found this in a little'o obscure newspaper called the New York Times. That's probably why it was so hard to find.

www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/09/12/science/earth/ocean-warming-climate-change.html?_r=0

If you want something deeper, her is where the NYT's got their info.

https://portals.iucn.org/library/sites/library/files/documents/2016-046_0.pdf
« Last Edit: November 01, 2016, 04:31:52 AM by Tigertown »

Tigertown

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Re: Ocean Temps
« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2016, 06:01:07 AM »
Introduction to Argo.

 

Tigertown

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Re: Ocean Temps
« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2017, 07:02:13 AM »
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2017/mar/10/earths-oceans-are-warming-13-faster-than-thought-and-accelerating


It is these changes that affect storms, such as the deluges that have recently affected California, or which have led storms to produce “thousand year floods” as has been seen in the Carolinas with Hurricane Matthew, or the Louisiana floods in August last year, or the Houston floods in April, and so forth. This kind of knowledge and understanding has profound consequences.

nicibiene

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Re: Ocean Temps
« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2017, 09:29:25 AM »
Thank you, @Tigertown. The Guardian seems to be the only journal where to find news of that kind... Yesterday evening I found that only a few german papers picked the incredible CO2 denial of Priutt, and none of the few publications offered the opportunity to leave a comment or start a discussion.

Usually I like to grab into that discussions. Always nice to get some other hints when reading comments:
`In fact, the climate models underestimated the rate of sea level rise because the rapid melting of the ice sheets and glaciers was not incorporated in the last IPCC report. (It was left out because the data were not considered sufficiently robust).`
Astonishing !
“We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” –“Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning.” Albert Einstein

gerontocrat

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Re: Ocean Temps
« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2017, 10:59:26 AM »
This is how I look at AGW.

 One can look at an el nino as the oceans burping out some of the excess stored heat which can then radiate out into space. A la nina can then be seen as accelerating heating of the biosphere - cool SSTs mean greater heat transfer from the atmosphere into longterm storage in the oceans. i.e. warming of the atmosphere is largely a side-effect of ocean heating.

Loss of sea ice exaggerates the effect on Arctic atmospheric temperatures, leadiing to positive feedback being even more heat captured by the oceans.

This new report on ocean heating is fairly disastrous. I guess we have to wait for the climate modellers to plug the data in.

Cate

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Re: Ocean Temps
« Reply #11 on: March 11, 2017, 12:30:51 PM »

Tigertown

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Re: Ocean Temps
« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2017, 11:31:06 PM »
Another RS article that applies here.
The Glowing Waters of the Arabian Sea are Killing off Ocean Life

https://robertscribbler.com/2017/03/19/the-glowing-waters-of-the-arabian-sea-are-killing-off-ocean-life/

But the human-caused climate change that is spurring the massive noctiluca blooms in the Arabian Sea is bringing on these new conditions over the mere course of a few decades.     

 The oceans beneath the noctiluca mats are now increasingly robbed of life. Oxygen levels are plummeting.

nicibiene

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Re: Ocean Temps
« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2017, 07:51:59 AM »
http://bigstory.ap.org/article/39cdba54f35548ffb0914094343bb0c6/growing-algae-bloom-arabian-sea-tied-climate-change  :'(

The satellite technology has enabled scientists to link the algae to higher levels of air and water pollution in recent decades, but Bontempi said questions remain. "We know that our Earth is changing," she said. "It may be in a direction we might not like."

Scientists based at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University trace Oman's blooms to melting ice in the Himalayas. Less ice has raised temperatures in South Asia and strengthened the Indian Ocean's southwest monsoon. As this weather front moves across the Arabian Sea every year, it churned up oxygen-poor water thick with nutrients that have fueled the rise of a 1.2-billion-year old algae called noctiluca scintillans.  [\quote]

“We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” –“Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning.” Albert Einstein