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Author Topic: Ice Thickness Literature and Science  (Read 726 times)

DrTskoul

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Ice Thickness Literature and Science
« on: February 11, 2017, 06:10:18 PM »
PETROGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF YOUNG SEA ICE,POINT BARROW, ALASKA

A pilot study is made of interrelations between structural features readily observed inhorizontal thin sections of sea ice under low magnification. The core used was 31.4 cm inlength and was collected from Elson Lagoon, Point Barrow, Alaska on 26 October, 1960.The growth of the ice sheet from its formation on 1 October to the time of sampling can bedescribed by....

« Last Edit: February 11, 2017, 06:34:22 PM by DrTskoul »
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DrTskoul

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“You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts.”
― Richard P. Feynman

DrTskoul

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Re: Ice Thickness Literature and Science
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2017, 06:31:58 PM »
“You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts.”
― Richard P. Feynman

DrTskoul

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Re: Ice Thickness Literature and Science
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2017, 06:46:20 PM »
“You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts.”
― Richard P. Feynman

oren

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Re: Ice Thickness Literature and Science
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2017, 12:20:21 AM »
Thank you Dr for opening this discussion and posting the links. Given the focus on FDDs and their anomalies and the resulting effect on ice thickness, such a thread is very important.
My own two cents is that the formulas derived under past arctic conditions might not work so well in the current environment:
Was: relative uniformity of winter temperatures. Currently: highly variable, with spikes to near-zero and storms in mid-winter.
Was: initial freeze-up under relatively calm conditions. Currently: large swaths of open water are often far from calm.
Was: average thickness of snow on the newly formed ice. Currently: Probably above-average snow due to more open water.

DrTskoul

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Re: Ice Thickness Literature and Science
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2017, 02:07:46 AM »
For average thickness over large grid cells etc. You are probably right. Locally though the physics are the same ( adding physics - waves, downwelling longrange IR, etc.will change result ; either you update formula or treat change aso a perturbation additive to the main formula)
“You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts.”
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crandles

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Re: Ice Thickness Literature and Science
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2017, 01:36:52 PM »
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016EF000410/full

Arctic ice management
also posted on geoengineering thread but re-posting here because

see fig 4 and section 2.1:

To constrain the ability of mechanical devices to thicken Arctic sea ice, it is first necessary to have a model of how seawater freezes.
...
We choose this value to match our derived x(t) to an empirical formula found by Maykut [1986]:
x(FDD) = .0133 FDD^.58   m

In Appendix A we solve the above formulas. The results are displayed in Figure 4. For the optimal value of c = 0.68, deriving the following formula (for x > x0):

x(FDD) = -.533 + 0.5 (FDD/221.2 + 1.364 )^.5    m