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Author Topic: Meltwater & Run-off  (Read 621 times)

Thomas Barlow

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Meltwater & Run-off
« on: April 16, 2017, 03:55:21 PM »
« Last Edit: April 16, 2017, 04:02:40 PM by Thomas Barlow »

Thomas Barlow

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Re: Meltwater & Run-off
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2017, 04:01:01 PM »
Ok, this is where it gets tricky.
--> https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170412105910.htm
.

Now there are microbes on surface and biological activity and minerals flowing into ocean. This creates photo-synthesis, absorbs carbon, also the bacteria and mineral-rich fresh water enriches ocean locally (a vast area actually). Increase in bioactivity and fauna, fish, whales. Increase in algae and plankton. All of that is good for the ocean (eg. N. Atlantic, Antarctic), nullifies acidity, and algae increases the ocean's ability to absorb CO2 and methane, as do bacteria which absorb methane.
All this is an unseen aspect, that scientists are just realizing (although they may be interpreting it in a limited way in this article), and may put the brakes on various abrupt climate-change scenarios going around.

More nutrients, algae, and plankton, in the ocean, as a result of fresh water, mineral rich run-off from glaciers, could improve ocean health, absorb carbon, nature could have surprises in store that can - as long as we stop polluting - stall, slow-down global warming. This article at the very least, proves that scientists are unaware of all processes. I think they have interpreted this as bad, but in fact, this could be good news.

But we have to stop polluting and mass factory livestock farming, slow population growth, etc.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2017, 03:42:19 AM by Thomas Barlow »

Archimid

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Re: Meltwater & Run-off
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2017, 04:22:38 PM »
I don't know about that. I prefer the biosphere as it is. Increasing temperature, CO2 and nutrients will most likely result in a favorable environment for algae. BUt what happens when any one organism gets an evolutionary advantage? It overwhelms others, like humans are doing to the planet. In algae it is best seen as harmful algae blooms.

The optimal algae rate of growth is the rate of growth that support the current ecosystem. An increase or decrease in algae will probably change the food chain in ways that might not be favorable to humans.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

Thomas Barlow

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Re: Meltwater & Run-off
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2017, 04:39:31 PM »
An increase or decrease in algae will probably change the food chain in ways that might not be favorable to humans.

Maybe so.
I think a discussion of meltwater run-off and fresh-water on the ocean's surface is an interesting discussion at this point. Seems like scientists are looking at it more and more.

(If there is already a discussion specifically about meltwater and run-off, I can move this to that discussion.)

prokaryotes

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Re: Meltwater & Run-off
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2017, 05:20:49 PM »
Related study (from Greenland)

Molecular and biogeochemical evidence for methane cycling beneath the western margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet http://www.nature.com/ismej/journal/v8/n11/full/ismej201459a.html

And Antarctic permafrost highlights the history of biogeochemical activity in some Antarctic regions. Coastal Antarctic Permafrost Melting Faster Than Expected https://news.utexas.edu/2013/07/24/coastal-antarctic-permafrost-melting-faster-than-expected

Thomas Barlow

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Re: Meltwater & Run-off
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2017, 05:42:06 PM »
Related study (from Greenland)

Molecular and biogeochemical evidence for methane cycling beneath the western margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet http://www.nature.com/ismej/journal/v8/n11/full/ismej201459a.html

And Antarctic permafrost highlights the history of biogeochemical activity in some Antarctic regions. Coastal Antarctic Permafrost Melting Faster Than Expected https://news.utexas.edu/2013/07/24/coastal-antarctic-permafrost-melting-faster-than-expected


Great !
I find this fascinating, and I think under-represented in the literature on ice-melt and the ecosystem it is unavoidably entangled with.

prokaryotes

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Re: Meltwater & Run-off
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2017, 06:01:36 PM »
Great !
I find this fascinating, and I think under-represented in the literature on ice-melt and the ecosystem it is unavoidably entangled with.

Indeed fascinating, also this, life might have evolved first in Greenland ...

From the study you initially posted above

The researchers say that additional studies are needed to refine the picture of whether the balance of carbon produced by glaciers is weighted more to release of ancient carbon or production by microorganisms.


Hints of oldest fossil life found in Greenland rocks http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/08/hints-oldest-fossil-life-found-greenland-rocks