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Author Topic: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD  (Read 242039 times)

gerontocrat

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #950 on: April 04, 2017, 03:25:40 PM »
CHERRY BLOSSOM (and other blossomings). The problem with early blossoming and fruit setting is late frosts and snow, as the eastern USA has just found out. Not easy to find out what is the real extent of losses - media never follows through.

jai mitchell

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #951 on: April 06, 2017, 10:26:06 AM »
40C in South Asia and Monsoon season predicted to arrive late (June)  :o

http://indiaclimatedialogue.net/2017/04/05/south-asia-braces-intense-heat-summer/

South Asia gets over three-quarters of its annual rainfall during the June-September monsoon season. Though agriculture accounts for only around 12% of India’s GDP now, over half the population is still dependent on farming, and an estimated 61% of farmers are without irrigation facilities and are totally dependent on rainfall. All these percentages are higher in Bangladesh, Nepal and Pakistan.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #952 on: April 09, 2017, 12:50:23 PM »
Mesmerizing Video Of Hawaii Beach Sand Reveals Unsettling Reality
The ocean’s plastic pollution problem is hiding in plain sight.
During a recent beach clean up in Kailua on the island of Oahu, the nonprofit group used a sand sifter to rid the sand of trash and plastic pollution. They filmed the slow-motion video... of the sifter in action to show people just how much harmful debris sits within the sand.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/sustainable-coastlines-hawaii-sand-sifter-kailua_us_58e97247e4b058f0a02fade1?
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Paddy

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #953 on: April 10, 2017, 09:51:09 AM »
I was thinking about coral reef bleaching, and had a couple of questions/conjectures:

- How much do sea and ocean CO2 levels and consequent acidity vary, and how closely tied is this to local airborne co2 emissions, e.g. from a local fossil fuel plant?
- Would there be any additional benefit for coral reef survival from local cuts in CO2 emissions leading to lower local co2 levels, above and beyond the contribution of such changed to global CO2 levels?
- Would reductions in any of the other emissions if such plants be beneficial for coral reef survival?

gerontocrat

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #954 on: April 10, 2017, 10:06:33 AM »
It seems that any solution to coral reef bleaching may be too late for much of the great barrier reef. Goto theguardian.com and find climate change and despair.

Paddy

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #955 on: April 11, 2017, 08:22:51 PM »
Yep, that was the article that inspired these thoughts.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #956 on: April 15, 2017, 10:00:19 PM »
More Sea Lions in Los Angeles and Orange Counties Showing Signs of Poisoning From Algae Bloom
Marine mammal rescue centers in Orange and Los Angeles counties are reporting increasing instances of sea lions showing signs of domoic acid poisoning, caused by a neurological toxin resulting from an ocean algae bloom, it was reported Monday.

The symptoms include lethargy and unawareness, according to the Orange County Register, which attributed its report of increased poisonings to an official at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Officials told the Register that the sea lions' plight could signal that the marine environment remains out of balance. A lack of food sources available to lactating mothers close to Channel Islands sea lion breeding grounds led to mass strandings starting in 2013.....
http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/More-Sea-Lions-LA-Orange-Counties-Signs-Poisoning-Algae-Bloom-419158974.html
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #957 on: April 16, 2017, 03:08:41 AM »
How will rising temperatures affect Atlantic Cod populations?
https://insideclimatenews.org/species/fish/atlantic-cod
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

AbruptSLR

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #958 on: April 17, 2017, 04:02:18 PM »
The linked reference provides an ESLD estimate of the decline in primary marine food production from the Tropical Oceans by 2100.

Lester Kwiatkowski et al. Emergent constraints on projections of declining primary production in the tropical oceans, Nature Climate Change (2017). DOI: 10.1038/nclimate3265


http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nclimate3265.html

Abstract: "Marine primary production is a fundamental component of the Earth system, providing the main source of food and energy to the marine food web, and influencing the concentration of atmospheric CO 2. Earth system model (ESM) projections of global marine primary production are highly uncertain with models projecting both increases and declines of up to 20% by 2100. This uncertainty is predominantly driven by the sensitivity of tropical ocean primary production to climate change, with the latest ESMs suggesting twenty-first-century tropical declines of between 1 and 30%. Here we identify an emergent relationship between the long-term sensitivity of tropical ocean primary production to rising equatorial zone sea surface temperature (SST) and the interannual sensitivity of primary production to El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-driven SST anomalies. Satellite-based observations of the ENSO sensitivity of tropical primary production are then used to constrain projections of the long-term climate impact on primary production. We estimate that tropical primary production will decline by 3 ± 1% per kelvin increase in equatorial zone SST. Under a business-as-usual emissions scenario this results in an 11 ± 6% decline in tropical marine primary production and a 6 ± 3% decline in global marine primary production by 2100."
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