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Author Topic: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD  (Read 252589 times)

gerontocrat

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #950 on: April 04, 2017, 03:25:40 PM »
CHERRY BLOSSOM (and other blossomings). The problem with early blossoming and fruit setting is late frosts and snow, as the eastern USA has just found out. Not easy to find out what is the real extent of losses - media never follows through.

jai mitchell

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #951 on: April 06, 2017, 10:26:06 AM »
40C in South Asia and Monsoon season predicted to arrive late (June)  :o

http://indiaclimatedialogue.net/2017/04/05/south-asia-braces-intense-heat-summer/

South Asia gets over three-quarters of its annual rainfall during the June-September monsoon season. Though agriculture accounts for only around 12% of India’s GDP now, over half the population is still dependent on farming, and an estimated 61% of farmers are without irrigation facilities and are totally dependent on rainfall. All these percentages are higher in Bangladesh, Nepal and Pakistan.
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+3C today

Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #952 on: April 09, 2017, 12:50:23 PM »
Mesmerizing Video Of Hawaii Beach Sand Reveals Unsettling Reality
The ocean’s plastic pollution problem is hiding in plain sight.
During a recent beach clean up in Kailua on the island of Oahu, the nonprofit group used a sand sifter to rid the sand of trash and plastic pollution. They filmed the slow-motion video... of the sifter in action to show people just how much harmful debris sits within the sand.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/sustainable-coastlines-hawaii-sand-sifter-kailua_us_58e97247e4b058f0a02fade1?
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Paddy

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #953 on: April 10, 2017, 09:51:09 AM »
I was thinking about coral reef bleaching, and had a couple of questions/conjectures:

- How much do sea and ocean CO2 levels and consequent acidity vary, and how closely tied is this to local airborne co2 emissions, e.g. from a local fossil fuel plant?
- Would there be any additional benefit for coral reef survival from local cuts in CO2 emissions leading to lower local co2 levels, above and beyond the contribution of such changed to global CO2 levels?
- Would reductions in any of the other emissions if such plants be beneficial for coral reef survival?

gerontocrat

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #954 on: April 10, 2017, 10:06:33 AM »
It seems that any solution to coral reef bleaching may be too late for much of the great barrier reef. Goto theguardian.com and find climate change and despair.

Paddy

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #955 on: April 11, 2017, 08:22:51 PM »
Yep, that was the article that inspired these thoughts.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #956 on: April 15, 2017, 10:00:19 PM »
More Sea Lions in Los Angeles and Orange Counties Showing Signs of Poisoning From Algae Bloom
Marine mammal rescue centers in Orange and Los Angeles counties are reporting increasing instances of sea lions showing signs of domoic acid poisoning, caused by a neurological toxin resulting from an ocean algae bloom, it was reported Monday.

The symptoms include lethargy and unawareness, according to the Orange County Register, which attributed its report of increased poisonings to an official at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Officials told the Register that the sea lions' plight could signal that the marine environment remains out of balance. A lack of food sources available to lactating mothers close to Channel Islands sea lion breeding grounds led to mass strandings starting in 2013.....
http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/More-Sea-Lions-LA-Orange-Counties-Signs-Poisoning-Algae-Bloom-419158974.html
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #957 on: April 16, 2017, 03:08:41 AM »
How will rising temperatures affect Atlantic Cod populations?
https://insideclimatenews.org/species/fish/atlantic-cod
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AbruptSLR

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #958 on: April 17, 2017, 04:02:18 PM »
The linked reference provides an ESLD estimate of the decline in primary marine food production from the Tropical Oceans by 2100.

Lester Kwiatkowski et al. Emergent constraints on projections of declining primary production in the tropical oceans, Nature Climate Change (2017). DOI: 10.1038/nclimate3265


http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nclimate3265.html

Abstract: "Marine primary production is a fundamental component of the Earth system, providing the main source of food and energy to the marine food web, and influencing the concentration of atmospheric CO 2. Earth system model (ESM) projections of global marine primary production are highly uncertain with models projecting both increases and declines of up to 20% by 2100. This uncertainty is predominantly driven by the sensitivity of tropical ocean primary production to climate change, with the latest ESMs suggesting twenty-first-century tropical declines of between 1 and 30%. Here we identify an emergent relationship between the long-term sensitivity of tropical ocean primary production to rising equatorial zone sea surface temperature (SST) and the interannual sensitivity of primary production to El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-driven SST anomalies. Satellite-based observations of the ENSO sensitivity of tropical primary production are then used to constrain projections of the long-term climate impact on primary production. We estimate that tropical primary production will decline by 3 ± 1% per kelvin increase in equatorial zone SST. Under a business-as-usual emissions scenario this results in an 11 ± 6% decline in tropical marine primary production and a 6 ± 3% decline in global marine primary production by 2100."
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DrTskoul

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #959 on: May 03, 2017, 01:53:41 AM »
From Climate Central: Europe’s Farming Vulnerable with Water Scarcity

Water scarcity half a world away caused by climate change could push up prices for meat and diary products in Europe by disrupting supplies of soybean, which is widely used as feed for livestock, researchers said Wednesday.

The European Union sources most soybean from outside the 28-nation bloc — mainly from Argentina, Brazil and the United States, according to an EU-funded study by Dutch-based NGO Water Footprint Network (WFN).

But 57 percent of soybean imports are from regions that are highly vulnerable to water scarcity, exposing Europe to possible shocks in supply, said Ertug Ercin, the study's co-author.

"The highest risk that the European meat and dairy sector will face due to climate change and weather extremes lies outside its borders," he said in a statement.


Less beef less problems.....
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DrTskoul

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #960 on: May 03, 2017, 01:55:31 AM »
"The EU's economy is dependent on the availability of water in other parts of the world for many crops," said Christopher Briggs, WFN executive director. "That makes it vulnerable to increasing water scarcity and drought."

Exporting unsustainability...
“You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts.”
― Richard P. Feynman

nicibiene

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #961 on: May 03, 2017, 08:06:47 AM »
All about Europe farmers have been affected by the freezing April following the warmest March ever. Vine, apples, strawberries, cherries, plums others berries. Farmers worked with emergency programs like burning fires, spraying water to freeze the blossoms, at the Bodensee region they even tried flying helicopters to mix the sky layers. Mostly all got in spite of the efforts a victim of the cold outbreak of the last weeks. (fortunately I'm living in a rough area where nature was not so far....thinking about planning some more trees here.  8)

http://www.newsweek.com/spring-freeze-damages-french-wine-production-591467
https://dobianchi.com/2017/04/21/freezing-temperatures-vineyards-italy/
http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/inpictures/2017/04/europe-late-spring-freeze-170422083859329.html
“We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” –“Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning.” Albert Einstein

oren

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #962 on: May 05, 2017, 11:55:26 PM »
Here's a blog post quoted on an economic blog I read regularly. The interesting thing for me is that the economic blogger is on the right-wing/denier/skeptic spectrum, and yet he quotes a very long post that seems spot on.
The post deals with quite a few issues but focuses mainly on agriculture and food so I chose to put it here.

https://mishtalk.com/2017/05/04/earth-overshoot-how-sustainable-is-population-growth/

Reader Rick Mills at Ahead of the Herd addresses the subject in a guest blog that first appeared on his blog as Earth Overshoot Day.

Earth Overshoot Day

The second half of the 20th century saw the biggest increase in the world’s population in human history. Our population surged because of:

Medical advances lessened the mortality rate in many countries
Massive increases in agricultural productivity caused by the “Green Revolution”
The global death rate has dropped almost continuously since the start of the industrial revolution – personal hygiene, improved methods of sanitation and the development of antibiotics all played a major role.

Green Revolution

The term Green Revolution refers to a series of research, development, and technology transfers that happened between the 1940s and the late 1970s.

The initiatives involved:

*Development of high-yielding varieties of cereal grains
*Expansion of irrigation infrastructure
*Modernization of management techniques
*Mechanization
*Distribution of hybridized seeds, synthetic fertilizers, and pesticides to farmers

Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #963 on: May 07, 2017, 05:20:33 PM »
Australia:  key to better crops is better connectivity.

Budget 2017: Data drought must come to an end to unlock agriculture's earning potential, farmers say
It is vital that Tuesday's federal budget addresses the data drought in regional Australia, farmers say.

Some of the poorest farmers in Africa have better digital connectivity than farmers here, David Statham, owner of cotton, grain and beef producer Sundown Pastoral Company, said.
...
http://www.abc.net.au/news/story-streams/federal-budget-2017/2017-05-07/federal-budget-2017-farmers-call-for-end-to-data-drought/8504454
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #964 on: May 12, 2017, 07:51:36 PM »
"We think about half of all suitable land will no longer be suitable [for coffee] by 2050."

Coffee's Fate Is Getting Jittery as Climate Change Puts Growing Areas at Risk
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/12052017/coffee-risk-climate-change-study-forests-puerto-rico
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #965 on: May 15, 2017, 08:41:31 PM »
Vertical farming: Lessons learned, new ideas.

So far, vertical farms grow mostly leafy greens, because the crops can be turned over quickly, generating cash flow easily in a business that requires extensive capital investment....

And the farms aren’t likely to grow wheat, rice or other commodities that provide much of a daily diet, because there is less of a need for them to be fresh, Mr. Gordon-Smith says. They can be stored and shipped efficiently, he says.

A Farm Grows in the City
Startups are leading the way to a future in which more food is grown closer to where people live
https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-farm-grows-in-the-city-1494813900
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

TerryM

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #966 on: May 16, 2017, 01:53:22 PM »
Vertical farming: Lessons learned, new ideas.

So far, vertical farms grow mostly leafy greens, because the crops can be turned over quickly, generating cash flow easily in a business that requires extensive capital investment....

And the farms aren’t likely to grow wheat, rice or other commodities that provide much of a daily diet, because there is less of a need for them to be fresh, Mr. Gordon-Smith says. They can be stored and shipped efficiently, he says.

A Farm Grows in the City
Startups are leading the way to a future in which more food is grown closer to where people live
https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-farm-grows-in-the-city-1494813900


I wonder if there is much documentation from Cuba re. their experiments with vertical gardening during the "Special Period"? Very little fuel, and the people still needed to be fed. - possibly practice for what lies ahead.
Terry

Shared Humanity

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #967 on: May 16, 2017, 02:23:48 PM »


A Farm Grows in the City
Startups are leading the way to a future in which more food is grown closer to where people live
https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-farm-grows-in-the-city-1494813900

This move to local will accelerate for all economic activity. It is small wonder that food is leading this trend, given the perishable nature for much of it.

gerontocrat

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #968 on: May 17, 2017, 01:17:06 PM »
Armyworms: The hungry caterpillar threatening a global food crisis
https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2017/may/16/armyworms-the-hungry-caterpillar-threatening-a-global-food-crisis

The article points to how large-scale mono-culture increases risks to food crops from infestations.

Also shows how maybe the fate of many millions of lives depend on one scientist and his small team.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #969 on: May 20, 2017, 12:54:36 AM »
“This is supposed to last for eternity....”

The Global Seed Vault, buried in a mountain deep inside the Arctic circle, has been breached after global warming produced extraordinary temperatures over the winter, sending meltwater gushing into the entrance tunnel.

Arctic stronghold of world’s seeds flooded after permafrost melts
No seeds were lost but the ability of the rock vault to provide failsafe protection against all disasters is now threatened by climate change
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/may/19/arctic-stronghold-of-worlds-seeds-flooded-after-permafrost-melts
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

TerryM

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #970 on: May 20, 2017, 03:55:02 AM »
“This is supposed to last for eternity....”

The Global Seed Vault[/b], buried in a mountain deep inside the Arctic circle, has been breached after global warming produced extraordinary temperatures over the winter, sending meltwater gushing into the entrance tunnel.

Arctic stronghold of world’s seeds flooded after permafrost melts
No seeds were lost but the ability of the rock vault to provide failsafe protection against all disasters is now threatened by climate change
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/may/19/arctic-stronghold-of-worlds-seeds-flooded-after-permafrost-melts
Notice
Eternity Expires
6/16/2021
Subject to future revision


prokaryotes

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #971 on: May 20, 2017, 01:12:53 PM »
! No longer available

Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #972 on: May 20, 2017, 08:56:58 PM »
The Crop That Ate America
Farmers who had long rotated plantings among a diverse group of grains are increasingly turning to a single one. Corn has always been a mainstay of U.S. agriculture, but its increasing profitability has driven up corn's share of total production, while grains such as wheat, oats and sorghum have steadily fallen, according to a Bloomberg analysis of a half-century of crop data. This locks farmers, as well as machinery-makers including Deere & Co., to the rises and falls of one crop, as both domestic and export markets grow more and more tied to the dominant U.S. grain. That exposes farmers to greater volatility and greater trade risk if a major buyer, such as Mexico, were to decide to stop buying U.S. corn.

Corn will make up 68 percent of this year’s projected harvest of major U.S. grains and oilseeds this year, according to data the U.S. Department of Agriculture released Wednesday. That’s up from 47 percent in 1968. New markets and technology have made corn more profitable compared to other crops, which is why longtime farmers once devoted to competitive grains have switched to the nation’s number-one source for biofuels and cattle feed.
...
Pushing along the economics were shifts in technology and markets. The U.S. approved genetically modified (GMO) corn and soybeans for planting in 1995. That reduced those crops’ risk of disease and simplified their cultivation, gains that weren’t matched in non-GMO wheat and other grains.
...
https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2017-crop-that-ate-america/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #973 on: May 25, 2017, 09:15:35 PM »
Factory Farms Put Climate at Risk, Experts Say in Urging Health Officials to Speak Out
Roughly 200 experts in disciplines from nutrition to animal welfare are calling on the World Health Organization to take a more serious look at the impact of industrial livestock production on human health and the climate.

In a letter sent Monday, the group—which includes former New York Times food writer Mark Bittman and environmentalist Bill McKibben—appealed to the WHO, asking that its next director-general work "to reduce the size and number of factory farms." The WHO's World Health Assembly got underway Monday, and the body will elect a new leader this week.

"As the global health community acknowledges the intertwined nature of planetary and human health, it must also confront the role that factory farming plays in climate change," the letter says.

The group points to predictions that, without a reduction in meat consumption, agriculture—including livestock production and growing grain to feed livestock—is on track to gobble up half the world's carbon budget if countries expect to meet the 2050 target of limiting global temperature rise to less than 2 degrees Celsius. The livestock industry's contribution to greenhouse gases come from direct sources, including methane emitted from the animals belching and their manure, but also from indirect sources, including land conversion and deforestation linked to growing feed.
...
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/22052017/factory-farms-cafos-threaten-climate-change-world-heath-organization
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.