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Ranman99

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #250 on: March 14, 2017, 10:54:43 AM »
I read Tom Clancy does not climate change present a "Clear and Present Danger"? Would those lying about it and covering up the truth not be liable to prosecution? Just curious. I'm not American.
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magnamentis

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #251 on: March 14, 2017, 07:09:27 PM »
I read Tom Clancy does not climate change present a "Clear and Present Danger"? Would those lying about it and covering up the truth not be liable to prosecution? Just curious. I'm not American.

while i dunno the U.S. Law, you're touching a (pointing at a) very important and great systemic flaw that is the "collective irresponsibility" of the political class, of course made possible by themselves through all kinds of "immunities" and blocking of sharp toothed law that would change that.

in one of my books that is currently in the making more responsibility plays a major role. because it's a long story it just try to describe it shortly:

politicians, all their promises and speaches should be recorded, brought to paper and they only should enter office after having signed that paper and there should be specific sentences for breaking that "contract" with the public.

penalties should range from monetary penalties up to death sentence for being responsible for the death of people by breaking the contract they signed while they always would have the option to alter contract with public assent by means of referendum. for example, one guy runs for president by promising that he will not send troups aproad (start a war) if for any reason he things he has to change that he would hold a referendum to get
peoples assent. if he does without he goes to jail and if soldiers were killed to the gallow. it's not that easy but as i said, it's too long of a story for this platform and polititians will never inflict such a thing on themselves, hence it will ultimately take some kind of revolution to implement more responsibility and enforcement through punishments that really hurts.

EDIT: just imagine what happens to impeached or ousted politicians and managers:

"Und wenn sie nicht gestorben sind dann leben sie heute noch in luxus und anerkennung"

(and they have not passed away yet they are continuously living in luxury and public recognition)

this would be the typical end of fairy tails which is exactly what it is, a fairy tail for them, a nightmare for the average people and a big big "JOKE"

In fact i have nothing agains people having a "very" good live, but as @Neven wrote elsewhere in this forum, there should be an upper limit, which, of course can be high enough to make it worthwhile to do a great job, make a great carrier, pay for extra work and efforts and so on, but it does not have to be enough to make dozens of next generations rich, spoiled brats and arrogant a'holes just because grand grand grand dad had successfully stolen from the aborigines, other natives or from planet earth.

just take the example of arms dealers, when i was young they were in every newspaper and magazine, mentioned and covered as respectable (honorable) people, just because they had lots of money. after that they got more or less outlawed and criminalized (rightly so) and who took over their entire business after that?????

RIGHT, OUR DEAR GOVERNMENTS, HIDING BEHIND THE INTEREST OF THE COUNTRY (MILITARY INDUSTRIAL AND FINANCIAL COMPLEX) Don't trust any politician who does not stop arms sales which is more or less ZERO of all those who currently have a say.


« Last Edit: March 14, 2017, 07:25:27 PM by magnamentis »
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Hefaistos

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #252 on: March 17, 2017, 09:09:10 AM »
African hotbed just getting worse:
"The Nile River Delta, once known as the bread basket of the world, may soon be unable to support even the population of Egypt. According to a multi-year study published in the Geological Society of America this week, the area where the Nile river drains out to the sea is suffering from decreased water flow, rising sea levels, and salt water intrusion—all of which damage food production and fresh water supplies.

“With a population expected to double in the next 50 years, Egypt is projected to have critical countrywide fresh water and food shortages by 2025,” the researchers from the University of Colorado wrote in a summary of the study."

https://qz.com/934106/egypts-nile-river-delta-once-the-bread-basket-of-the-world-may-soon-be-uninhabitable/

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #253 on: April 08, 2017, 06:35:25 PM »
More on the Nile, including new political considerations.

The Vanishing Nile: A Great River Faces a Multitude of Threats
The Nile River is under assault on two fronts – a massive dam under construction upstream in Ethiopia and rising sea levels leading to saltwater intrusion downstream. These dual threats now jeopardize the future of a river that is the lifeblood for millions.
http://e360.yale.edu/features/vanishing-nile-a-great-river-faces-a-multitude-of-threats-egypt-dam
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #254 on: April 09, 2017, 04:35:47 PM »
An updated look at south Florida, from the BBC.

Miami’s fight against rising seas
...
It’s an ambitious agenda. And it’s one that’s working. Areas where roads have been raised and pumps installed have been much drier. But, as Gassman noted, it’s not enough to change one piece of infrastructure without changing everything else. In this case, what happens when you raise a road without raising all of the properties around it? Water can go into the properties.

That’s not supposed to happen when the pumps work. But they can fail. Antonio Gallo’s Sardinia Enoteca Ristorante is one of a number of businesses that have found their ground floors are now below the current road and sidewalk height. Last year, the pumps failed to kick in after a brief period of rain; the restaurant flooded, with diners stuck inside. When Gallo went to file his insurance claim, it was turned down. According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (Fema), which runs a national flood insurance programme for at-risk business and property owners like Gallo, anything below street level is considered a basement. Until Fema changes their policy, that includes all of the businesses now below the raised streets. Miami Beach is working closely with Fema to get not only Gallo’s situation, but the general basement classification, re-assessed.
...
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170403-miamis-fight-against-sea-level-rise
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Archimid

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #255 on: April 18, 2017, 04:18:39 PM »
No relief in sight as heat wave continues to build across northern India

http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/no-relief-in-sight-as-heat-wave-continues-to-build-across-northern-india-this-week/70001408

Extract:
Dangerous heat will continue to build across much of India this week, and there is no relief in sight.
The most intense heat will be found across northern India, stretching from West Bengal and Odisha to Rajasthan, the National Capital Region and Punjab.
Daily high temperatures will approach or exceed 43 C (110 F) in these areas with the warmest locations recording temperatures exceeding 46 C (115 F).
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #256 on: April 18, 2017, 10:00:53 PM »
U.S.:  Norfolk, Virginia.
“Adaptation is a range,” says Fred Brusso, a former city flood manager. “Do you need to just move your car? Do you have to put your washer and dryer on cinder blocks? Or do you need to get the heck out of town?”
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/18/magazine/when-rising-seas-transform-risk-into-certainty.html
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DrTskoul

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #257 on: April 20, 2017, 12:00:33 PM »
Miami Florida:

H/Tip Andy_in_SD@Scribbler

The Nightmare Scenario for Florida’s Coastal Homeowners

Demand and financing could collapse before the sea consumes a single house.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2017-04-19/the-nightmare-scenario-for-florida-s-coastal-homeowners
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oren

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #258 on: April 20, 2017, 03:03:25 PM »
I liked this quote:
He described South Florida’s real estate market as “pessimists selling to optimists,”

sidd

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #259 on: April 20, 2017, 07:53:37 PM »
The most shocking quote from that article :

"Realtors in Florida face no legal requirement to warn potential buyers about those flood risks."

the real estate industry has learned nothing from 2008 meltdown.

gerontocrat

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #260 on: April 22, 2017, 12:44:12 PM »
Robertscribbler.com has a new article on the drought in India. Already likely to have medium to long term effects on lives of several hundred million people.

OrganicSu

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #261 on: April 22, 2017, 01:52:23 PM »
I liked this quote:
He described South Florida’s real estate market as “pessimists selling to optimists,”
The quote kinda leeds me to the idea that 'the situation' is a matter of subjective perspective and thereby misleading to the subconscious feelings about ASLR.
Would the editor have been allowed to describe South Florida’s real estate market as “realists selling to optimists,”? Would have had a stronger effect on any perspective low elevation potential property purchasers (LEPPP'ers for short)....

jai mitchell

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #262 on: April 26, 2017, 06:56:56 AM »
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TerryM

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #263 on: April 26, 2017, 06:29:02 PM »
Jai
The only question I have is to ask if Louisiana ever was "livable". ;D


Terry

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #264 on: May 05, 2017, 03:08:58 AM »
Dust storm chokes Beijing and northern China
...
"I've got used to smog, time to try something new. If I have to choose one to live in, between sandstorm and smog, I prefer the former," said another Weibo commenter.

China has seen particularly intense air pollution in recent years, especially in winter as many of its northern cities still largely rely on burning coal for heating.

But it is also increasingly affected by dust storms, as its cities expand towards nearby deserts which in turn have been spreading due to climate change.
...
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-39801555
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #265 on: May 07, 2017, 05:12:17 PM »
New York City Creates Climate Change Roadmap for Builders: Plan for Rising Seas
The city’s new resilience guidelines map out the expected risks from sea level rise and increasing heat in the decades ahead.
The nation's largest city has a message for the architects and engineers planning the New York of tomorrow: Fortify new buildings against the ravages of climate change or risk rebuilding as global warming worsens.

New guidelines issued last week by the office of New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio are some of the most comprehensive for how builders should protect infrastructure against rising seas, more powerful storms and climbing temperatures. They draw on science published in 2015 by a city panel of experts that estimates rainfall, sea level rise and other climatic shifts expected for the city in the decades ahead. ...
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/02052017/nyc-publishes-building-design-guidelines-adapting-climate-change
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #266 on: May 08, 2017, 11:50:46 PM »
While ocean-front property comes to mind when we think of the risks of climate change, let's not forget lakeshore and riverfront property, which are in danger due to extreme precipitation, storms, and flooding.

"Lots of Lake Ontario shoreline is breaking away and falling into the water.  A bad situation is worsening"
Brief video clip of houses endangered by eroding shoreline: https://twitter.com/john_kucko/status/861629741413040128
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #267 on: May 20, 2017, 06:16:18 PM »
Many of the lessons learned and applied in this Japanese city hit by a tsunami can also be used for areas threatened by sea level rise or flooding.

In Japan Tsunami City, People Power Turns Disaster Into Opportunity
http://floodlist.com/asia/japan-tsunami-city-people-power-turns-disaster-opportunity
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Archimid

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #268 on: May 22, 2017, 03:16:20 PM »
Quite literally, less livable.

At least 161 people have died due to heat stroke in Telangana

http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/telangana-heatwave-hike-in-temperature-sunstroke-deaths/1/958608.html
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #269 on: May 24, 2017, 02:08:20 AM »
Landslide on California Highway 1 is part of $1 billion in damage
BIG SUR, Calif. (AP) — A massive landslide that went into the Pacific Ocean is the latest natural disaster to hit a California community that relies heavily on an iconic coastal highway and tourism to survive, and it adds to a record $1 billion in highway damage from one of the state's wettest winters in decades.

The weekend slide in Big Sur buried a portion of Highway 1 under a 40-foot layer of rock and dirt and changed the coastline below to include what now looks like a rounded skirt hem, Susana Cruz, a spokeswoman with the California Department of Transportation, said Tuesday.

More than 1 million tons of rock and dirt tumbled down a saturated slope in an area called Mud Creek. The slide is covering up about a one-quarter-of-a-mile (0.40-kilometer) stretch of Highway 1, and authorities have no estimate on when it might re-open. The area remains unstable.
...
One of California's rainiest and snowiest winters on record has broken a five-year drought, but also caused flooding and landslides in much of the state and sped up coastal erosion.

"This type of thing may become more frequent, but Big Sur has its own unique geology," said Dan Carl, a district director for the California Coastal Commission whose area includes Big Sur. "A lot of Big Sur is moving; you just don't see it."

Even before the weekend slide, storms have caused just over $1 billion in highway damage to 424 sites over the fiscal year that ends in June, Mark Dinger, also a spokesman for the state transportation agency, said Tuesday. That compares with $660 million last year, he said.
...
http://www.sfgate.com/news/us/article/Massive-slide-covers-stretch-of-Highway-1-near-11165911.php
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #270 on: May 28, 2017, 04:04:26 AM »
“Fugate also said rating companies were wrong to assume that cities are well prepared for climate change, or that their revenue will necessarily recover after a natural disaster.”

Rising Seas May Wipe Out These Jersey Towns, but They're Still Rated AAA
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-05-25/investors-say-it-s-time-to-price-climate-into-cities-bond-risks
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sidd

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #271 on: May 28, 2017, 07:22:35 AM »
I wonder that anyone trusts the rating companies after the big oops in 2008.

"Laskey, of Fitch, was skeptical that rating companies could or should account for climate risk in municipal ratings.

"We’re not emergency-preparedness experts," she said in a phone interview. "Unless we see reason to think, ‘Oh, they’re not paying attention,’ we assume that they’re competent, and they’re doing what they need to do in terms of preparedness."

The people who buy those bonds are so screwed. The banks are playing both sides of the game. "The Big Short" is an indispensable movie to understand how the banks set up deals to fail, and bet on them failing.

sidd

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #272 on: May 30, 2017, 07:31:52 PM »
"“The water sneaks up the backside of barrier islands and the flooding you get is sometimes actually greater than on the ocean sides due to the topography of the islands. That is the case all the way up and down the East Coast to Miami Beach.”

Overlooked and insidious: Back-bay flooding plagues millions
https://apnews.com/604031c25bb94e68b4d50823cf4df4ab/Insidious-but-overlooked:-Back-bay-flooding-plagues-millions
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Jim Pettit

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #273 on: May 31, 2017, 02:18:22 PM »
The third and final season of the Netflix series Bloodline, a crime/family drama set in (and filmed in) the Florida Keys, was just released, and it was interesting to see that rising sea levels play a small but pivotal part in the finale. And, happily, not at all in a completely-over-the-top, hyperbolic, Day After Tomorrow way, with meteotsunamis and grinding ice sheets rapidly taking over the land while CGI wooly mammoths and sabre-toothed tigers wander the newly-formed glaciers of Manhattan, but in a more matter of fact, Florida-is-absolutely-screwed kind of way. Bottom line (and here the requisite SPOILER ALERT): an important real estate transaction is invalidated after it's found that the property in question--the show's, and family's, oceanside geographic anchor in Islamorada--is rendered unsaleable because rising seas will make it unlivable in just the next decade or two.

IMHO, that's a very realistic way of looking at things.

Rising seas will reclaim Florida. That's a given. And that means the loss of hundreds of billions of dollars in property and infrastructure, and the displacement of tens if not hundreds of thousands of Floridians. In Bloodline, the fictional family's entire fortune has been put into their beautiful resort, just as real-life families generally find their home to be by far their most valuable real asset. So when those seas creep up and in over the coming years, there'll be no buyers for those homes. Ditto the empty factories, the unreachable distribution centers, the dead farms, the mushy golf courses, the soggy hotels, the washed-out theme parks, the unrentable retail outlets. And so on. Many will simply be abandoned to the waves. And if your home is indeed your greatest asset, what do you do when you can neither sell it nor keep living in it? Where does a family with no money go? What are they to do? Where will they work when the workplaces are gone? Who will they serve when there's no one left to serve?




Tor Bejnar

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #274 on: May 31, 2017, 03:12:15 PM »
Driving through 'small town America' - especially the towns and villages bypassed by the interstate highway system (including in Florida) - provides me with an image of the future.  Walking through the lettered avenues (A, B, C) in Manhattan [New York City] (years ago - redevelopment may have occurred) and driving though former industrial cities also provides images of the future abandonment of coastal parts of the world.  And there are images from scuba divers (etc.) of flooded valleys (for hydro dams or 'earthquake lakes') with buildings left in tact.

Think of all the opportunity for future development. Nothing reeks of 'progress' better than new construction! [/sarcasm] (Yes, such new construction will often be 'less livable' if designed by many-a-modern technocrat.)
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TerryM

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #275 on: May 31, 2017, 05:22:35 PM »
The 1st time I saw the bottom drop out was in Southern California in the mid 60's. LBJ suddenly decided that Aerospace should move to Houston. Tens of thousands lost their jobs directly, perhaps a million or more lost employment in bowling alleys, construction, retail, local government, and real estate.
Most in critical positions moved to Texas. A well educated work force wasn't something Texas could immediately offer, so Aerospace jobs in Texas were available to everyone whose work wasn't guarding the perimeter, or sweeping the floor. But families where both parents worked was already the norm by the mid 60's in California, and wrenching decisions had to be made. Should the family follow dad and his reduced income aerospace job while mom quit her lucrative teaching position? Young Bud suddenly wasn't selling any of his custom surfboards & his older sis certainly wasn't getting many calls for interior decorating.


Whole subdivisions were boarded up and taken off the market for years. If you didn't have a lot of equity in the house you walked away. If it was almost paid for it might be years before a buyer was found, and then at a fraction of it's former value. White only neighborhoods became passe and housing became affordable to many who maintained steady employment. In Riverside the whole of downtown closed up and a generation past before it's rebirth.


This wasn't today's Detroit, but it was scary to a Canadian kid who was new to the country and had never seen poverty. I never felt that California was quite the same afterward. Too many bright people moved away. Too many business's closed. Too many shattered & scattered families.
Governor Reagan was elected and anti-intellectualism reared it's emptied head. Hippies made love in public, surfers moved to the Texas hill country, and our generations drug culture clashed with their generation's alcoholics.


This didn't happen once a long time ago in California. It's just another cog in a wheel that will spin ever faster as vast regions become less and less livable. Droughts, floods, sea level rise, crop failure, and the election of actors that can mimic sincerity as they avow that it's someone else's fault.
Pictures from the era that come to mind include machine gun nests on the roof of the local bowling alley, a large valley where every house has plywood sheets covering all of the windows and doors, a poster of Ronald Reagan in a cowboy hat, balancing a box of Boraxo on his photo shopped bicep, with the caption reading "SINCERITY".


Terry

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #276 on: June 02, 2017, 02:23:52 PM »
A very impressive string of links to articles that clearly point to the eventual collapse of real estate values in areas that are at the front lines. Thank you, everyone.

The collapse of market values in these regions is closer than you think and will not be gradual but instantaneous, just as the collapse in the real estate crisis of 2007 through 2010 spread across the country. The impact on our financial system will be overwhelming and will require a government bailout of the financial system of a magnitude never before seen.

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #277 on: June 04, 2017, 03:22:17 AM »
Families scramble for relief as summer heat scorches Hanoi

http://e.vnexpress.net/news/news/families-scramble-for-relief-as-summer-heat-scorches-hanoi-3594425.html

Many have fled to the countryside as the capital city is set to become a frying pan this weekend.


I don't know the source but it seems likely.
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Archimid

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #278 on: June 13, 2017, 03:11:09 PM »
Climate Change Has Made Heat Waves Much More Deadly, Mainly for the Poor

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/608089/climate-change-has-made-heat-waves-much-more-deadly-mainly-for-the-poor/

It is generally held that if we can avoid warming the planet by 2 oC above pre-industrial temperatures, we may be able to avoid the worst effects of climate change. In India, though, just a quarter of that warming has more than doubled the risk of deadly heat waves.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #279 on: June 16, 2017, 12:56:32 AM »
Cross-post from the Weather thread:

The southwest U.S. is setting up for a record heatwave.

Eric Holthaus: 
- Since 1895, Tucson has recorded temperatures at 114°F or hotter only 8 times. That'll happen at least 3 more times in the next week....
https://twitter.com/ericholthaus/status/875422306666815488

- Between 1951-1980 & 1981-2010, the average number of days at or above 100°F in Tucson increased by 55%. An already hot place getting hotter.
https://twitter.com/ericholthaus/status/875424277545099265

- After decades of warming, this will literally be the longest, most intense heat wave in Tucson history. I'm a meteorologist. This is my job.
https://twitter.com/ericholthaus/status/875448014516625408
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MrVisible

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #280 on: June 16, 2017, 07:00:58 AM »
There's a weird mix of excitement and dread that comes with having your hometown show up in the "Places becoming less livable" thread.

This should be interesting.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #281 on: June 18, 2017, 07:27:18 PM »
Not Your Mother’s Jersey Shore
Five years after Hurricane Sandy destroyed communities along the shore, some towns have used the rebuilding process as a time to reinvent themselves.
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/16/realestate/hurricane-sandy-rebuilding-jersey-shore-towns.html

The comments on the article are remarkably consistent.
This is probably the last generation who will build their homes at the New Jersey shore.  The risk is significant that by the end of a 30-year mortgage, the house will no longer be there.  And federal and state money will increasingly be needed elsewhere.
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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #282 on: June 20, 2017, 04:04:31 PM »
Phoenix flights cancelled because it's too hot for planes

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-40339730

As temperatures climb in Phoenix, Arizona, more than 40 flights have been cancelled - because it is too hot for the planes to fly.



It seems to me that we'll soon need a "Heatwaves and its Consequences" thread.

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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #283 on: June 20, 2017, 05:42:28 PM »
THE SCIENCE BEHIND ARIZONA'S RECORD-SETTING HEAT WAVE
Planes are grounded, tap water comes out hot, and we’d all better get used to it.
In the Arizona desert, as far back as weather records go, it's never been this hot for this long.

By early Monday afternoon, the temperature was 111 degrees in Tucson, the first in a forecasted series of a record-setting seven consecutive days with highs above 110, the longest streak in city history. (The previous record, should it fall, was six days in a row in 1994.)

In Phoenix, just to the north, temperatures were even hotter. Meteorologists there are expecting temperatures to run as high as 120 degrees on Tuesday and Wednesday, at the apex of the heat wave. The National Weather Service is calling the heat wave "extreme even by desert standards."

What's an extreme heat wave like in a place that's accustomed to extreme heat? Here's a snapshot of Monday:

• A Phoenix television station broadcast a live webcam of a 600-pound block of ice.
• In Sacramento, California, a team of meteorologists successfully baked cookies and fried bacon inside a car, with temperatures inside the car reaching nearly 200 degrees.
• The United States Border Patrol stepped up safety messages, saying "it is physically impossible for the average person to carry enough water to survive."
The National Weather Service also warned against walking pets outdoors, saying that at pavement temperatures above 162 degrees (consistent with air temperatures of 102), skin is instantly destroyed.
...
The atmospheric culprit for the heat is a very intense high pressure, which is itself setting records. Though the statistical databases show this high of high pressure to be an approximately one-in-200-year event, these events have been occurring more often lately—with the last one happening just last year. In short, the background signal of global warming makes the entire atmosphere thinner and less dense, supporting stronger high-pressure centers like the one camped out over Arizona this week, which then tend to get stuck in place—cranking up the thermostat over a multi-state region.
...
https://psmag.com/environment/terrifying-heat-waves-in-arizona
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Archimid

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #284 on: June 20, 2017, 06:22:05 PM »
This is just at about 1C with an arctic ice cap. How will it look like when we are at 2C and no ice to draw heat north?
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oren

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #285 on: June 20, 2017, 06:52:08 PM »
This is just at about 1C with an arctic ice cap. How will it look like when we are at 2C and no ice to draw heat north?
I'm afraid we will find out in a decade or two.

RikW

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #286 on: June 21, 2017, 10:42:56 AM »
I somehow like to think "It's your own fault, since you voted Trump", but I guess that's not really fair ;)

rboyd

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #287 on: June 21, 2017, 05:29:17 PM »
More like 1.2 degrees above pre-industrial, and looks like we are not getting a La Nina to help out. With the warm phase of the PDO, looks like we are set for continued rapid temperature increases.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #288 on: June 22, 2017, 02:07:52 AM »
"Before last year, Tucson had reached 115°F only four times in history. Today's the third time in three days."
http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/twc/climate/tus.php

https://twitter.com/ericholthaus/status/877672465610166272
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Neven

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #289 on: June 22, 2017, 05:44:09 AM »
Jojo left his home in Tucson, Arizona.  ;)  ??? :(
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #290 on: June 22, 2017, 03:04:46 PM »
Eric Holthaus:  In Tucson, the wildlife are feeling the heat, too.
Here's how to help:
http://tinyletter.com/sciencebyericholthaus/letters/today-in-weather-climate-hottest-in-tucson-history-edition-thursday-june-22nd

Walking outside today felt like another planet. My wife rescued a pigeon that she said seemed very out of it and had stumbled onto our front porch. She set out a bit of food and water and it was gone a few hours later. Some other animals here haven't been as lucky. A friend said he personally knew of several people whose backyard chickens had died overnight. The local wildlife rehab center has seen four times the number of distressed animals as usual this week.


https://twitter.com/ericholthaus/status/877768979514773504
« Last Edit: June 22, 2017, 03:13:34 PM by Sigmetnow »
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #291 on: June 23, 2017, 07:58:09 PM »
U.K. heat wave.  Desperate times call for desperate measures. :o

British schoolboys don skirts to protest shorts ban in heat wave
http://www.cnn.com/2017/06/22/europe/british-schoolboys-skirt-protest-heatwave/index.html
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #292 on: June 23, 2017, 10:52:33 PM »
Extreme Heat Waves Will Change How We Live. We’re Not Ready
Heat waves are nothing new, but they have increased in frequency and severity in recent decades as a result of climate change. And each extreme heat event reveals another way our society simply isn't built for such high temperatures, from our transport systems to the agriculture industry.

"We’ve built entire infrastructures with particular temperatures in mind," says Matthew T. Huber, an associate professor of geography at Syracuse University. "When temperatures get really high, we don’t have the material capacity to deal with that."...
http://time.com/4830147/extreme-heat-climate-change/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #293 on: June 23, 2017, 11:00:22 PM »
It's So Hot In Arizona Right Now That Everything Is Literally Melting.  (Or baking.)
https://www.buzzfeed.com/terripous/its-too-darn-hot

"It's so hot that plastic mailboxes are melting, making them double over."
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Archimid

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #294 on: June 24, 2017, 03:38:03 AM »
Amazing.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

Archimid

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #295 on: June 27, 2017, 12:55:24 AM »
As Lake Chad vanishes, seven million people are on the brink of starvation.

https://newrepublic.com/article/143019/one-meal-day-lake-chad-vanishes-seven-million-people-starvation

Not so long ago, Lake Chad was one of the largest bodies of water in Africa. The thick reeds and vital wetlands around its basin provided vast freshwater reserves, breeding grounds for fish, fertile soil for agriculture, and grasslands where farmers grazed their animals. In 1963, it spanned almost 10,000 square miles, an expanse roughly the size of Maryland. But as climate change has taken its toll, the lake has shrunk by 90 percent. Today, only 965 square miles remain. Wetlands have given way to sand dunes. Farmers have abandoned their fields. Those who still live by the lake struggle to survive, beset by chronic drought and the slow onset of ecological catastrophe.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

pileus

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #296 on: June 27, 2017, 01:47:53 AM »
It's So Hot In Arizona Right Now That Everything Is Literally Melting.  (Or baking.)
https://www.buzzfeed.com/terripous/its-too-darn-hot

"It's so hot that plastic mailboxes are melting, making them double over."

Looks like a Dali piece (who by the way is being exhumed for a paternity test on his DNA).

Here in Seattle it was 96f yesterday, tying the hottest June temp on record.  About 70-80% of dwellings lack AC.  Humidity tends to be reasonable and it does usually cool down nicely after dark, but the nights are very short here in the summer, especially around the solstice.

Noticing that more new construction have added AC, but the average home price in Seattle is now $720,000, so it's not just climate change making this place less livable.

pileus

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« Reply #297 on: June 29, 2017, 08:20:19 AM »
Something you don't see too often:  one of the mainline MSM sources with coverage of a heatwave and parallel impacts on water viability in Pakistan.  It's a rather grim and disconcerting article.  Very easy to see how this type of scenario leads to a war over water with neighboring India, all the more troubling since both are nuclear powers. 

In Pakistan, scorching Ramadan month highlights chronic water, power shortages

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/in-pakistan-scorching-ramadan-month-highlights-chronic-water-power-shortages/2017/06/27/074a20a4-576d-11e7-840b-512026319da7_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-top-table-main_pakistanheat-10pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.966ceb46c99f

The Ramadan ordeal has brought into sharp relief the chronic water and power shortages plaguing this arid, Muslim-majority country of 180 million. In cities, families had to fill jugs and bottles from public taps at 3 a.m. In villages, long daily electrical outages stopped fans from whirring and tube wells from pumping water to irrigate parched fields.

As the month dragged on, people lost patience. Violent protests broke out from the vast port city of Karachi to the hilly tribal region of Malakand. Electric-company offices were looted, ­police stations attacked, roads blocked. Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif ordered the electricity cuts shortened to several hours a day, but everyone knew that the move was only a temporary appeasement.
---
Pakistan’s water problem runs much deeper and has far more potential to devastate the country. Unlike power, water is a finite resource, highly vulnerable to global warming. Pakistan’s access to it depends partly on rivers from India, a hostile neighbor, and regionally on Himalayan glaciers that are beginning to melt. By mid-century, experts predict, the country could run out of water entirely.

Many Pakistanis blame India for using dams to divert river water that, under a treaty signed in the 1960s, should be flowing into Pakistan. India has fought three wars with Pakistan, and people are concerned that the water dispute will intensify under Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, an ardent Hindu nationalist.
---
We have had times when India wanted to go to war with us, but if they try to take our water, or if we run out of it, that will be worse than war,” he said. “If the water stops, there will be no crops, and people will die.”

wili

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #298 on: June 30, 2017, 07:28:21 AM »
Iranian city soars to 129 degrees, may have tied modern times’ world temperature record


The country’s southwestern city of Ahvaz topped the highest temperature ever recorded in Iran and may have matched the world record of 129.2.


from WaPo
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Forest Dweller

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Re: Places becoming less livable
« Reply #299 on: June 30, 2017, 04:33:28 PM »
Weather alarm has been issued for Turkey, Greece, Macedonia & Bulgaria the coming days.
45 C expected or more in Turkey, Bulgaria expected to have anomalies of 20 C too warm.
Records breaking or tied seems possible, further east maybe as well.
Rajasthan, India i.e. will come close to 50 C.
Current Rajasthan record is 51 C.