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Author Topic: Effects on Arctic Wildlife  (Read 2938 times)

wili

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Effects on Arctic Wildlife
« on: August 10, 2013, 06:22:12 PM »
I was looking for an appropriate thread to put this link in and was surprised not to find anything on general effects of ice loss and warming on Arctic wildlife. Effects on, for example, polar bears is often the first thing mentioned in the popular press, so maybe people were trying to avoid the cliche?

Anyway, here's the latest from Climate Central:

http://www.climatecentral.org/news/arctics-rapid-sea-ice-loss-threatens-wildlife-16331

Arctic’s Rapid Sea Ice Loss Threatens Wildlife

The loss of Arctic sea ice is bad news for the Pacific walrus, and for polar bears: the walrus has further to swim to dig for clams on the sea floor, and the polar bear has less chance of catching seals. But the real problems begin at the base of the food chain.

Since the end of the last century, more than two million square kilometers of sea ice have disappeared, and the loss of summer ice is accelerating. Researchers call this “a stunning loss of habitat for sea ice algae and sub-ice plankton which together account for 57 percent of the total annual primary production in the Arctic Ocean.”...


"A force de chercher de bonnes raisons, on en trouve; on les dit; et après on y tient, non pas tant parce qu'elles sont bonnes que pour ne pas se démentir." Choderlos de Laclos "You struggle to come up with some valid reasons, then cling to them, not because they're good, but just to not back down."

Anne

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Re: Effects on Arctic Wildlife
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2013, 11:49:00 PM »
Hi Wili,

Thanks for posting this. There are a couple of Wildlife comments on the Off-topic section. I didn't know where else to post it. It's an important issue IMO, though not many agree.  BTW, there has been a lot of coverage in the last couple of days of the carcase of an emaciated polar bear, but the widespread attribution to climate change seems tenuous.

ritter

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Re: Effects on Arctic Wildlife
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2013, 05:36:52 AM »
Hi Wili,

Thanks for posting this. There are a couple of Wildlife comments on the Off-topic section. I didn't know where else to post it. It's an important issue IMO, though not many agree.  BTW, there has been a lot of coverage in the last couple of days of the carcase of an emaciated polar bear, but the widespread attribution to climate change seems tenuous.

We have destroyed this ecosystem. There is no other way to put it. The Arctic canary has been dead for some time.

Whit

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Re: Effects on Arctic Wildlife
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2013, 03:21:03 PM »
It's changing quite rapidly, and the weather is weirding on my side of things. I'm heading for the north coast of the Kola peninsula in 2 weeks. There's been almost no rain for the last 2-3 months. The rivers are 50-60 cm below average. I was hoping for some cloudberries in addition to the odd trout, but I can't see that happening. Temperatures have been up to 34 C as far as I know.

I've fished and travelled the north coast of Kola for nearly a decade and norwegian Lapland for twice as long. The insect hatches are coming earlier and earlier, and spring is early. The most striking and easily visible change is the vegetation. The tundra on the norwegian side is "slowly" turning into forest.

Trout are displacing arctic charr in a couple of rivers i know of. The fish-scientists I talk to blame a combination of temperature and possibly pressure from sea-lice from the fish farms. The displacement is happening in rivers where none of the fish go to sea as well, so I'll put my money on temperature.

I'll give a brief report about the state of things on the ground up there when I get back.
Is it progress if a cannibal eats with a fork?

wili

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Re: Effects on Arctic Wildlife
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2013, 08:28:06 AM »
"I'll give a brief report about the state of things on the ground up there when I get back."

Thanks for the insights. I look forward to any further observations you may have.
"A force de chercher de bonnes raisons, on en trouve; on les dit; et après on y tient, non pas tant parce qu'elles sont bonnes que pour ne pas se démentir." Choderlos de Laclos "You struggle to come up with some valid reasons, then cling to them, not because they're good, but just to not back down."

Anne

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Re: Effects on Arctic Wildlife
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2013, 12:28:07 PM »
An interesting BBC article about an  expedition to record wildlife around the Laptev Sea and the possible impact of increased shipping and mining.

ETA: note the tabs at the top of the article, which link to other aspects of the Russian Arctic:
The Taimyr Peninsula
Polar Bears and
The Laptev walrus
« Last Edit: August 26, 2013, 03:07:31 PM by Anne »

wili

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Re: Effects on Arctic Wildlife
« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2013, 07:56:57 PM »
http://www.climatecentral.org/news/krill-face-greater-risks-in-a-warming-antarctic-16388

Krill Face Greater Risks in Warming Antarctic Waters

They may not look very appetizing, but they are what sustains much of the marine life in the southern ocean. Antarctic krill, usually less than 2.36 inches long, are the primary food source for many species of whale, seal, penguin and fish.

 But there’s a problem: the waters round Antarctica are warming, and it looks as if they will probably continue to do so. If they do, a team of UK researchers says, the area where the krill grow could shrink by a fifth.

It is the fact that krill are known to be sensitive to sea temperature, especially in the areas where they grow as adults, that prompted the scientists to try to understand how they might respond to the effects of further climate change.
"A force de chercher de bonnes raisons, on en trouve; on les dit; et après on y tient, non pas tant parce qu'elles sont bonnes que pour ne pas se démentir." Choderlos de Laclos "You struggle to come up with some valid reasons, then cling to them, not because they're good, but just to not back down."

pikaia

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Re: Effects on Arctic Wildlife
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2013, 12:54:25 AM »
Greenland will become greener, but only slowly unless humans help to spread the vegetation.
 http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130828092258.htm

Jim Hunt

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Re: Effects on Arctic Wildlife
« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2013, 10:10:12 PM »
Swimming with a polar bear:

Rencontre avec l'ours polaire Le piège blanc extrait) wmv
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Effects on Arctic Wildlife
« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2017, 03:58:37 AM »
@ Espen

I know this is probably OT, but some time ago you made a passing reference on this thread to the predicament of polar bears on Svalbard. You may (or may not) have seen this article from December 2015, which states that the sub-population there was in pretty good shape...
http://www.npolar.no/en/news/2015/12-23-counting-of-polar-bears-in-svalbard.html

Unfortunately, winter 2016/17 hasn't been doing any favours for those members of the Ursus maritimus species stuck on Svalbard since early in last year's melt season. It will be "interesting" to see the next update on their status.

Not too old:  (and I think this is the 'right' thread on the forum...)
Tourism increase leads to polar bears being shot dead in the Arctic
   By David Sim   -   September 28, 2016

More and more polar bears are being shot dead on Norway's remote Arctic islands, as they come into increasing contact with people, due to an increased number of tourists and a reduction in the sea ice on which the creatures roam. Halfway between the northern tip of Europe and the North Pole, the Svalbard archipelago of snow-capped mountains and glaciers are home to 2,654 people and 975 polar bears, according to a 2015 tally by the Norwegian Polar Institute. ...
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

Cate

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Re: Effects on Arctic Wildlife
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2017, 02:27:38 PM »
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/davis-strait-polar-bears-ice-decline-1.4077164

Sea ice changes affecting polar bear populations in Davis Strait.

Polar bear scientist at the U of Alberta, who has been studying bears for 35 years, says the ice-free period off Labrador is increasing by 18 days per decade, because of  ice melting earlier and forming later in the fall. This affects bear access to seals, their preferred food.

As well, "One of the big findings was the reproductive rates were down. And that means that over the longer term the population is certainly not growing, and may be declining."


Bruce Steele

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Re: Effects on Arctic Wildlife
« Reply #11 on: Today at 05:52:02 AM »
Beaufort beavers. Beaver dams a few miles from the Beaufort have shown up for the first time in the Northern reaches of Canada.

https://www.adn.com/arctic/2017/04/19/as-woody-shrubs-move-north-in-a-warming-climate-beavers-make-a-beachhead-on-the-arctic-coastal-plain/