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JimD

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Ships and boats
« on: November 01, 2013, 05:30:32 PM »
This morning I decided we needed a post on ships to go along with the ones on cars and planes.  Sort of in honor of Bruce so he does not think we forget him  ;)

Commercial Fleet

Fleet statistics weave a fascinating pattern. By mid-2011 the world’s entire fleet of all types of commercial ships over one hundred tons had increased its gross tonnage to 1 billion. At the end of last year the total reached 1.09 billion GT, numbering 86,300 ships. This gigantic armada includes not only the vast fleets of bulk carriers, tankers and container ships, but also a wide range of other types. General cargo vessels, multi-purpose ships, car carriers, roll on-roll off vessels, gas carriers, reefer tonnage, cruise ships, offshore service vessels and others (such as tugs and dredgers) are represented. Many perform services which do not involve carrying cargo, of course.
According to figures compiled by shipping information providers Clarksons, another (nautical) milestone was attained recently. The world’s fleet of vessels actually carrying cargo – which had numbered 50,000 over seven years ago – reached 1 billion GT in September last year, and since then has grown to 1.01 billion, comprising 57,400 ships, today. It is especially significant that this achievement resulted from cumulative growth of an astounding 43 percent over the past five years, averaging 7.5 percent annually.
Looking at the fleet statistics in more detail reveals some impressive performances over the past few years. Expansion rates in the largest sectors have been rapid. Measured by deadweight volume, the tonnage measurement normally used in the bulk markets, the world fleet of bulk carriers has grown by 73 percent in the past five years. At the end of 2012 there were 9,500 bulk carriers totalling 679 million dwt. The tanker fleet’s growth was 29 percent during the same period, to a total of 515 million dwt (13,500 ships, including 7,700 small tankers below 10,000 dwt). In the container ship sector, where the standard measurement is TEUs (twenty-foot-equivalent units), the world fleet reached 5,100 ships totalling 16.2 million TEU at the end of 2012, after growing by 50 percent over a five-year period.


Fishing Fleet

In 2002 the world fishing fleet numbered about four million vessels. About one-third were decked. The remaining undecked boats were generally less than 10 metres long, and 65 percent were not fitted with mechanical propulsion systems. The FAO estimates that Asia accounts for over 80 percent of them.

The average size of decked vessels is about 20 gross tons (10–15 metres). Only one percent of the world fishing fleet is larger than 100 gross tons (longer than 24 metres). China has half (25,600) of these larger vessels.


Recreational boating. US numbers

There were 527,000 new boats sold in 2011, an increase of two percent compared to 2010, with a total retail value of $6.1 billion, an increase of 3.5 percent over 2010. (Table 5.2) (Edit:  both power and sail).
 
Boat registrations were down two percent in 2010, falling to a total of 12.4 million, compared to nearly 12.7 million the previous year.


I could not find global numbers for recreational boats just the US.  But if the US has almost 13 million one has to figure that the world total must have numbers near 50 million.

There are a LOT of ships and boats out there.  And I did not even bother about counting the military vessels as there are only 10,000 or so of them. 

If one spent some time looking up data they could get an estimate of the total fuel consumption of the above vessels but I was too lazy today.  But it is a lot.   And it tends to be very polluting as most of the big vessels are burning bunker fuel and have little to no emissions control.

http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/News.aspx?ElementId=984ef639-7f94-4d62-88a9-f80b3ecc6fb9

Most of the rest of the data is from various wiki pages.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fishing_vessel
We do not err because truth is difficult to see. It is visible at a glance. We err because this is more comfortable. Alexander Solzhenitsyn

How is it conceivable that all our technological progress - our very civilization - is like the axe in the hand of the pathological criminal? Albert Einstein

Bruce Steele

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2013, 03:03:00 AM »
Jim, nice to know that 65% of fishing boats do not have "mechanical propulsion ". The other 35%
( me included ) need to get real and go back to wind.  It is  one of the few industries that could
, if it wanted to , convert to wind .  In the long haul there will always be fishermen , and in the long haul more than 65% of the fishing fleet will be wind powered. There are some hard times between now and then. 

JimD

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2013, 03:55:49 PM »
Here's a sort of what are they thinking story.

A 10 billion dollar floating city ship which is 4500 ft long, 350 ft tall, 750 ft wide that would have 50,000 residents, 10,000 crew, and up to 40,000 day guests, an airport, docks, casino, hospital,, etc,, etc.

It would be too big to ever dock anywhere. 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2514936/The-incredible-mile-long-floating-CITY--complete-schools-hospital-parks-airport-50-000-residents.html
We do not err because truth is difficult to see. It is visible at a glance. We err because this is more comfortable. Alexander Solzhenitsyn

How is it conceivable that all our technological progress - our very civilization - is like the axe in the hand of the pathological criminal? Albert Einstein

bligh8

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2013, 06:42:50 PM »
The expansion of international shipping cannot be overstated, at least based on what I’ve seen.  My last transit of the Windward Passage toward the Western Caribbean was enlightening.  There were so many large commercial ships that I thought: There should be a traffic cop around here. I passed through the choke point at night, it was very difficult to plot a safe course through the maze of ships who often were on the vhf arguing about who has the right of way.

I, as a wind driven vessel had the responsibility under Maritime International Law, outlined in the Navigational Rules Of The Road, to be the “stand on vessel”, maintaining course and speed. Mechanically driven vessels are the “give way” vessel and are required to change course and speed to avoid collision.  All this is very convenient but outside of the influence of the US Coast Guard rules become fuzzy.

They just awarded the contracts to raise the Bayonne Bridge from 151 ft to 215ft some of this was done to accommodate the larger and more fuel-efficient vessels arriving here from the newly expanded Panama Canal.
http://www.panynj.gov/bayonnebridge/

It use be that once outside the shipping routes and at least 3 or 4 hundred miles off the coast, I could grab 6 or 8 hrs sleep.  Now I’ve been forced to change that to 20min ever three hrs. Risk assessments of the changing variables suggest that this is border line dangerous, however it’s a danger that every single-handed sailor faces.  International rules also state that every ship maintain a Able Body Sea-men to stand watch at all times,
an impossibility for the single-handed sailor.


JimD

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2013, 08:04:47 PM »

It use be that once outside the shipping routes and at least 3 or 4 hundred miles off the coast, I could grab 6 or 8 hrs sleep.  Now I’ve been forced to change that to 20min ever three hrs. .....  International rules also state that every ship maintain a Able Body Sea-men to stand watch at all times, an impossibility for the single-handed sailor.

In the spirit of keeping all our members here alive I volunteer to stand alternate watches next time you cross the Pacific or Atlantic (sailing across one or both of them was a big dream of mine when I was young).  I even have some deep water sailing experience to boot (Los Angeles to SF once). 
We do not err because truth is difficult to see. It is visible at a glance. We err because this is more comfortable. Alexander Solzhenitsyn

How is it conceivable that all our technological progress - our very civilization - is like the axe in the hand of the pathological criminal? Albert Einstein

Shared Humanity

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2013, 12:04:38 AM »

It use be that once outside the shipping routes and at least 3 or 4 hundred miles off the coast, I could grab 6 or 8 hrs sleep.  Now I’ve been forced to change that to 20min ever three hrs. .....  International rules also state that every ship maintain a Able Body Sea-men to stand watch at all times, an impossibility for the single-handed sailor.

In the spirit of keeping all our members here alive I volunteer to stand alternate watches next time you cross the Pacific or Atlantic (sailing across one or both of them was a big dream of mine when I was young).  I even have some deep water sailing experience to boot (Los Angeles to SF once).

A generous offer.

bligh8

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2013, 03:48:11 PM »

It use be that once outside the shipping routes and at least 3 or 4 hundred miles off the coast, I could grab 6 or 8 hrs sleep.  Now I’ve been forced to change that to 20min ever three hrs. .....  International rules also state that every ship maintain a Able Body Sea-men to stand watch at all times, an impossibility for the single-handed sailor.

In the spirit of keeping all our members here alive I volunteer to stand alternate watches next time you cross the Pacific or Atlantic (sailing across one or both of them was a big dream of mine when I was young).  I even have some deep water sailing experience to boot (Los Angeles to SF once).

Thanks Jim....I'm working on and planning a voyage, all things remaining constant it should begin next June,  you are certainly welcome.

In the link above, about the raising of the Bayonne bridge,(a billion $ project) this represents a morphology in the shipping industry.  At one time an entire fleet of ships were created to accommodate the constraints of the Panama Canal, the pana-max fleet.
Now the shipping industry created a new fleet of ships even larger forcing the canal authorities to widen the canal (which has been ongoing for 10 years). To transit the canal these ships are paying from 60 to one hundred thousands bucks, still a good deal when one considers the alternatives.
These newer ships with their more efficient hull designs and better power plants cruise at 22 to 24 kts. as apposed to 12kts for their older sister ships. My vessel hull speed is 7.2 knots so a closing speed of about 30kts is considered when trying to catch some shut eye. Although I have ASI and Radar that allows me to form a dual collision avoidance system, there is nothing like a pair of eyes to scan for these floating cities.
ASI is useless for other than ships, radar is weak where ice is concerned, even though I can adjust bandwidth making it marginally better.  I see the calved portion of the PIG is projected to be a factor in shipping safety if it follows it's projected course.

bligh8

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2013, 08:20:20 PM »

It use be that once outside the shipping routes and at least 3 or 4 hundred miles off the coast, I could grab 6 or 8 hrs sleep.  Now I’ve been forced to change that to 20min ever three hrs. .....  International rules also state that every ship maintain a Able Body Sea-men to stand watch at all times, an impossibility for the single-handed sailor.


In the spirit of keeping all our members here alive I volunteer to stand alternate watches next time you cross the Pacific or Atlantic (sailing across one or both of them was a big dream of mine when I was young).  I even have some deep water sailing experience to boot (Los Angeles to SF once).


A generous offer.


I’m fairly careful about whom I let on my vessel, when planning an off-shore sailing event.  Two years ago I was planning to sail offshore for a total of 4000 nm and 2000nm inter island sailing. Leaving in December out into the N. Atlantic required some considerations about who was capable. A young lady who works with my wife at the hospital wanted to go badly. I talked with her twice, she was intelligent, capable and with a t-type personality a good candidate. In the end I concluded no, not for her safety, but my peace of mind…. allowing me to concentrate on the sailing and not her safety. She was slender and looked as though she did not have the upper body strength to deal with this

S/V Horizon. In route to the BVI's. approx. 500 mi offshore


Those were force 7/8 conditions, on a down hill run, with a following current making things lumpy.  One can visualize how easy it might be to break a rib or an arm.



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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2013, 10:22:16 PM »
These newer ships with their more efficient hull designs and better power plants cruise at 22 to 24 kts. as apposed to 12kts for their older sister ships. My vessel hull speed is 7.2 knots so a closing speed of about 30kts is considered when trying to catch some shut eye.

7.2 knots theoretical (1.34 x SQRT(LWL)) - or actual? What is your LWL?

In the spirit of keeping all our members here alive I volunteer to stand alternate watches next time you cross the Pacific or Atlantic (sailing across one or both of them was a big dream of mine when I was young).  I even have some deep water sailing experience to boot (Los Angeles to SF once). 

Hmm, how much risk you happy to run?

bligh8

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2013, 01:10:07 AM »
My LWL is about 29.6ft thus the 7.2kts…. However the Original design of my vessel was handed down from the famous Colin Archer Design…his double ender.  Archer designed the “Fram” which participated in Nansen’s expeditions to the North Pole and in Ronald Amundsen’s first trip to the South Pole. Archer was the first Naval Architect to be commissioned to build a rescue ship then used to rescue fisherman caught in gales in the North Sea. His complex mathematical equations suggesting his double ender design would allow a wind driven vessel to climb over their own bow wave were merely a mathematical hic-up and later discredited. However to this day his designs are often consulted when designing new ships. Within the link below you will see mention of my vessel, a Westsail 32. You’ll also see names like Dumas & Knox-Johnston, famous for their circumnavigation efforts.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_Archer

If your gonna be involved in open ocean sailing there is no better boat than a heavy Colin Archer design, they are truly a uncompromising blue water cruiser.


ccgwebmaster

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #10 on: December 03, 2013, 04:12:09 AM »
My LWL is about 29.6ft thus the 7.2kts….
...
Within the link below you will see mention of my vessel, a Westsail 32. You’ll also see names like Dumas & Knox-Johnston, famous for their circumnavigation efforts.

My LWL is ~43', which should give a hull speed of 8.79 knots? I'd be surprised if I can do that in practice though (not built for speed). It's a steel schooner which I expect to displace over 30 tons when I'm done (and I hope not too much more, I won't raise the waterline any higher than I already did). I usually quote LOD (48') if people ask how big - as the long bow sprit on the front and the davits at the back make it sound bigger than it really is. All things being equal soon I'll find out how we get on offshore, even if there's still a lot that ought to be done first in an ideal world...

A big project, perhaps overly ambitious, we'll see soon enough.

JimD

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2013, 05:04:09 AM »
Hmm, how much risk you happy to run?

Always a good question.  About 8 years ago when I came home and told my wife I was retiring I offered her my first two favorite options.
1.  We sell everything and buy a nice sail boat and spend the next 10-15 years sailing all over the world.
2.  We sell everything and emigrate to New Zealand or Australia.

She said no to both. So we sort of compromised and I started up my organic farming operation.  Life. 
We do not err because truth is difficult to see. It is visible at a glance. We err because this is more comfortable. Alexander Solzhenitsyn

How is it conceivable that all our technological progress - our very civilization - is like the axe in the hand of the pathological criminal? Albert Einstein

bligh8

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2013, 08:38:14 PM »
My LWL is about 29.6ft thus the 7.2kts….
...
Within the link below you will see mention of my vessel, a Westsail 32. You’ll also see names like Dumas & Knox-Johnston, famous for their circumnavigation efforts.

My LWL is ~43', which should give a hull speed of 8.79 knots? I'd be surprised if I can do that in practice though (not built for speed). It's a steel schooner which I expect to displace over 30 tons when I'm done (and I hope not too much more, I won't raise the waterline any higher than I already did). I usually quote LOD (48') if people ask how big - as the long bow sprit on the front and the davits at the back make it sound bigger than it really is. All things being equal soon I'll find out how we get on offshore, even if there's still a lot that ought to be done first in an ideal world...

A big project, perhaps overly ambitious, we'll see soon enough.

Sounds like a very worthwhile project to me.

Wow….My dream boat, a 48ft steel schooner. With this type of vessel one could safely navigate well within the Antarctica circle. I thought there must be some nautical background for you to know the hull speed calculation. Yep your are correct about your hull speed and the practical application suggestion, for seldom does one desire to hoist enough sail to generate max hull speed.

I’m a little overly curious so I hope you don’t mind if I ask a few question?  Like, was this a home made project or a purchased hull project.  Your alterations to the water line suggest additional weight; do you know your displacement/length ratio? This calculation, I’m sure you know, will help define your practical hull speed. Is the steel rolled and welded, 6mils perhaps? The additional weight would obviously have lowered your “M” point, have you calculated your righting arm. Just curios.

 As far as speed goes, my best day was 203nm, suggesting a 8.5nm hull speed average. I had altered my course slightly to the North to catch the S. Equatorial current South of Madagascar; ( a no no in every sailing guide you’ll ever read) in gale force conditions I was carrying to much sail & did not care. Hurricane season was well underway and there was a tropical wave to the North, normally a prudent man, this day I was in a hurry. When the gps started spiking over 10kts I had visions of the mast going faster than the hull, forcing me on deck and changing the sail configuration and again Horizon felt happy 8). Pryor to that she was/felt unhappy, there was no undulation between the sails, rig and hull….the entire vessel was moving as one….opps :-[

Best of luck with your project, perhaps I’ll see ya out there amongst the waves.

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #13 on: December 04, 2013, 08:16:48 AM »
I’m a little overly curious so I hope you don’t mind if I ask a few question?  Like, was this a home made project or a purchased hull project.  Your alterations to the water line suggest additional weight; do you know your displacement/length ratio? This calculation, I’m sure you know, will help define your practical hull speed. Is the steel rolled and welded, 6mils perhaps? The additional weight would obviously have lowered your “M” point, have you calculated your righting arm. Just curios.

Purchased hull project, straight-forward welded construction with a single chine. In principle many major items necessary present, in practice years of poor prior maintenance, some theft, and further (major) life complications made it into an even bigger project that it was originally. Total refit inside appropriate, and as it turns out renewal of all interior systems (incomplete but in progress). Picked up welding (through trial and error and asking questions of people who know how) to add a bulk head, repair the hull (cut out some sections and put in good plate), create steel (ultimately to be watertight) doors, etc. - I'm sure you know how it goes if you take on a boat without much ample funding, you learn how to do things yourself or you fail - there isn't a middle road.

Displacement/length ratio right now should be around 290, I anticipate a value at least 350 when finished, 390 at the theoretical upper end (depending what it takes to set things up where I feel they're right, and on the limits set by the waterline which is about as far as I'd care to cut freeboard ie I want some!).

I did calculate the righting moment as the vessel originally sat one night in the water (literally lifted a ton and a half of water up by hand) to tip it over slightly - arrived at righting force of nearly 8000 ft-lbs or 10850Nm at 5 degrees of list. Have not been able yet to find another boat owner who has any idea what their initial righting moment is for comparison and need to repeat the exercise (hopefully with a pump next time) now that I changed so much.

The new waterline is my best guess as to what I need worst case, arrived at by estimating my anticipated additional displacement for the approximate cross-sectional area and allowing for the addition of ballast (the vessel has almost none, which cannot be right) as well as all the new steel, batteries (almost a half ton in batteries alone), etc.

I cannot pretend to any nautical knowledge any more than any other sort of knowledge, but all things being equal within a few weeks I'll have stared evolution in the face to see if I'm fit enough to survive (I have to relocate internationally before completing). Then I might put a bit more about the project in another topic on the forum (the one to do with building things).

Unfortunately (and with a nod to the original point of this topic), I might have no option but to run on the engine for at least several days - the current weather forecast is way beyond what I'd dare tackle with sails given inexperience and standing rigging in serious need of renewal (the materials I have, the time I do not).

bligh8

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2013, 04:21:12 PM »
Your description was nicely put, and I commend your efforts, as I know all to well about the “project”. 
It might be helpful for you to find out who & why this hull was designed the way it was.
The only non-ballasted steel sailing vessels I’ve seen were Island Traders, they use their cargo for ballast.
It’s best to keep your DLR under 350 utterwise you’ll be handling giant sails, which is tough.
If you don’t mind could you be a little more specific about your up-coming sail as in …from-to and when? I understand if you do not wish to put this on an open forum.
 


domen_

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #15 on: September 30, 2014, 02:09:05 PM »
Fully electric ferry in Norway to enter operation in 2015:
“The electrically-powered ferry was originally developed as a submission to a Norwegian Ministry of Transport competition where the winner would get a 10-year license to operate the Lavik-Oppedal route beginning in 2015. The new ferry, the world’s first to operate solely on battery power, will operate the route with 34 crossings a day, 365 days a year beginning January 1. The route and Norway in general is considered ideal for battery-powered ferries because of the short routes.”

“The vessel has capacity for 120 cars and 360 passengers and will operate at about 10 knots.”
http://insideevs.com/electric-ferry-wins-ship-year-award/

It will replace old diesel ferry and eliminate the need for 264 000 gallons of fuel annually.

Laurent

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #16 on: January 05, 2015, 03:13:01 PM »
Anthropogenic pressure on the open ocean: The growth of ship traffic revealed by altimeter data analysis
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014GL061786/abstract

Abstract

Marine ecosystems are under increasing anthropogenic pressures from marine and terrestrial activities. Ship traffic, the major cause of change in the open ocean, and its temporal evolution are still largely unknown because of lack of data. Altimeter data provide a new powerful tool to detect and monitor the ship traffic through a method of analysis of echo waveform. The archive of seven altimeter missions has been processed to create a two decade database of ship locations. The estimated annual density maps compare well with the ones obtained from Automatic Identification System. The ship traffic analysis shows a global fourfold growth between 1992 and 2012, the largest increase being observed in the Indian Ocean and the Chinese seas reflecting the world trade change. Although mainly concentrated along lanes, the traffic has a direct impact on the atmosphere, e.g., on the growth of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide in the Indian Ocean.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #17 on: January 10, 2015, 08:11:08 PM »
German wind- and diesel-energy ship saves fuel and carbon emissions.
German company Emercon’s E-Ship 1, the world’s first wind energy cargo vessel, arrived in the port of Montevideo this week to a warm welcome from Uruguayan politicians and business leaders.

The 130-meter (425-feet) long vessel departed from Germany in November and docked here this week with the equipment for the installation of 50 turbines at the Peralta GCEE Wind Farm in the northern province of Tacuarembo.

http://www.evwind.es/2015/01/09/enercon-wind-energy-ship-arrives-in-uruguay/49829
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Laurent

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #18 on: February 25, 2015, 02:58:57 PM »

Rick Aster

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #19 on: May 17, 2015, 10:58:57 PM »
I am currently taking The World Bank's course on global warming economics at Coursera ( https://www.coursera.org/course/warmerworld ) and for my final project I created an infographic on Arctic shipping. It can be seen at:

http://fivemoreanswers.tumblr.com/post/119140013195/my-arctic-shipping-infographic-references

I picked this topic because it's a current effect of climate change that financially minded people can track by following the money. Cargo shipping across the Arctic has advanced from being a novelty in 2008 to being a regular part of shipping logistics a few years later, and it could become much bigger with further retreat in the Arctic sea ice. I tried to create a simple one-minute summary of the topic in a graphic.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #20 on: June 14, 2015, 02:53:08 AM »
Ten-minute recharge time!

World’s First All-Electric Battery-Powered Ferry
A Norwegian emission-free ferry called the Ampere was granted the esteemed “Ship of the Year” award as the SMM trade show in September 2014. The ferry is reportedly the first all-electric battery-powered car and passenger ferry in the world. The battery-powered vessel, with a comfortable capacity of 120 cars and 360 passengers operating at about 10 knots, is apparently in service 365 days per year.

http://cleantechnica.com/2015/06/13/worlds-first-electric-battery-powered-ferry/
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #21 on: June 14, 2015, 04:15:49 AM »
Rick,
I just read your post and infographic.  I appreciate that you called out the irony of what is being shipped through the Arctic!
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

icefest

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #22 on: June 15, 2015, 05:01:53 AM »
@sigmetnowIt seems strange that it's easier using one battery to charge another at each end, than just switching the battery when it arrives.
Open other end.

Chuck Yokota

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #23 on: June 15, 2015, 02:51:48 PM »
icefest -- The article says the ferry's battery weighs 10 tons and is the equivalent of 1600 car batteries. Further, one picture shows the battery is constructed as banks of individual cells, each fastened separately.

icefest

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #24 on: June 16, 2015, 12:41:40 AM »
10 tons is about as much as a truck/lorry. It's not that big for car ferry.
Divide the load into two batteries, wheel them in, and put one in each hull.


I'm just surprised that is cheaper dealing with the 10% energy waste due to adding another battery and the doubled charge cycles than making the battery hot-swappable.
Open other end.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #25 on: August 11, 2015, 05:17:34 PM »
New report: Marine hybrid propulsion market to reach $4.46 billion by 2022
The report finds that ferry operators are the major adopters of hybrid systems. Most ferries operate in coastal areas and inland waterways, where emissions standards are stricter than on the high seas. Ferry operators, particularly in Europe, are investing substantial amounts in hybrid tech, so this segment is likely to grow extensively during the forecast period.
https://chargedevs.com/newswire/new-report-marine-hybrid-propulsion-market-to-reach-4-46-billion-by-2022/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #26 on: June 10, 2016, 01:50:22 AM »
Royal Navy ships are losing power because of warm seas
Britain's £1bn ($1.4bn) warships are losing power in the Persian Gulf because they cannot cope with the warm waters, MPs have been told.

Six Type 45 destroyers have repeatedly experienced power outages because of the temperatures, leaving servicemen in complete darkness.
...
Leahy told MPs that turbines do not generate as much power when they run in a hot environment, which is not recognized by the system.

"This is when you get your total electrical failure," Leahy explained.

"Suddenly, you have lost your main generator on your system and you are plunged into darkness."

http://www.cnn.com/2016/06/09/europe/britain-royal-navy-warships/index.html
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #27 on: June 13, 2016, 09:36:54 PM »
Still going!

Solar Voyager’ autonomous boat looks to make history in sun-powered journey across the Atlantic
About 200 miles due east of Boston, a robotic boat is putting along at a walking pace on what could be an historic journey across the entire Atlantic. “Solar Voyager,” built by two friends in their spare time, would be the first autonomous vessel to cross that ocean — and the first one to cross any ocean using solar power alone.

http://techcrunch.com/2016/06/08/solar-voyager-autonomous-boat-looks-to-make-history-in-sun-powered-journey-across-the-atlantic/
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #28 on: August 23, 2016, 01:39:25 AM »
A 91-inch (2.3 meters) solar-powered boat propelled itself successfully from California to Hawaii.  Now it's headed for New Zealand.

Seacharger: fully autonomous, solar-powered boat journeys across the Pacific
https://electrek.co/2016/08/22/seacharger-fully-autonomous-solar-powered-boat-journeys-across-the-pacific/
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #29 on: March 16, 2017, 01:05:00 AM »
Green finance for dirty ships
New ways to foot the hefty bill for making old ships less polluting
SHIPPING may seem like a clean form of transport. Carrying more than 90% of the world’s trade, ocean-going vessels produce just 3% of its greenhouse-gas emissions. But the industry is dirtier than that makes it sound. By burning heavy fuel oil, just 15 of the biggest ships emit more oxides of nitrogen and sulphur—gases much worse for global warming than carbon dioxide—than all the world’s cars put together. So it is no surprise that shipowners are being forced to clean up their act. But in an industry awash in overcapacity and debt, few have access to the finance they need to improve their vessels. Innovative thinking is trying to change that....
http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21718519-new-ways-foot-hefty-bill-making-old-ships-less-polluting-green-finance
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rboyd

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #30 on: March 17, 2017, 08:09:55 PM »
The sulphur emissions actually cause global dimming, the effect being amplified over the oceans that are relatively pristine. So cleaning up the sulphur emissions will actually increase the local level of warming.

http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/8217/2015/acp-15-8217-2015.pdf


Paddy

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #31 on: April 04, 2017, 11:13:38 AM »
Nice article in the BBC today about the rise of lower carbon ferries in Norway and elsewhere: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-39478856

Sigmetnow

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Re: Ships and boats
« Reply #32 on: April 07, 2017, 10:12:03 PM »
With stronger storms and changing ocean dynamics in our future, will subterranean safe zones become more common?

Norway to Build World’s First Ship Tunnel to Bypass Part of Ocean
COPENHAGEN, Denmark — Norway plans to build the world's first tunnel for ships, a 5,610-feet passageway burrowed through a piece of rocky peninsula that will allow vessels to avoid a treacherous part of sea.

Construction of the Stad Ship Tunnel, which would be able to accommodate cruise and freight ships weighing up to 16,000 tons, is expected to open in 2023.

It will be 118 feet wide and 162 feet tall and is estimated to cost at least $314 million.
...
http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/norway-build-world-s-first-ship-tunnel-bypass-part-ocean-n743716
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.