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Author Topic: Gardening  (Read 107061 times)

sidd

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #450 on: April 05, 2017, 09:15:13 PM »
Re: Vermin in compost piles

Doesn't anyone have cats? I do composting in open piles, three at a time. Start a new one every year, use after three. Occasional turnover, with a shovel if i feel energetic, with a backhoe or frontend loader if not. Get field mice and moles and voles and such, the cats take care of it. I was turning over one of them once and one of the cats came up an protested vociferously. I found the reason soon enough, a little hole dug into the corner of the pile, with six (?!) bodies of assorted mice and voles hidden under some leaves. Clearly she had been storing them. I covered them up again and stayed away from that  corner.

I consult the cats nowadays (put out some cat food by the piles, wait till they show up, and then start turning over the piles while watching them for signs of dissent.)

sidd

mati

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #451 on: April 06, 2017, 12:06:53 AM »
the problem i have had in the past with open compost pits is that when the bears are hungry, they come by and clean them out.
and so it goes

DrTskoul

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #452 on: April 06, 2017, 12:41:30 AM »
the problem i have had in the past with open compost pits is that when the bears are hungry, they come by and clean them out.

Ha..talking about recycling...
“You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts.”
― Richard P. Feynman

sidd

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #453 on: April 06, 2017, 01:01:18 AM »
ooo, bears will kill cats. Need a loud dog for those. So far  black bears havent come around the compost heaps, tho they are around. Last year one killed a turkey but usually they stick to berries and such. But the trash is securely locked up and i think the trashpickers like the raccoons and bears (and these days coyotes) know it.

sidd

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #454 on: April 06, 2017, 08:39:47 AM »
Hello,

I also have a question regarding watering. My watering can has a capacity of around 10 liters.

When I feel that I'm generous (like a once a week watering for vegetables that already have enough roots), I have water for a line of about 3 meters of vegetables.

When I feel greedy (like a daily watering of seeds and shoots), I go about 6 meters.

If there is a bush that needs water, I put about a half watering can on it.

Of course, I adapt the watering to the meteorological conditions.

Do you see this as more or less ok ?

Thanks a lot.

Etienne
« Last Edit: April 06, 2017, 08:50:40 AM by etienne »

silkman

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #455 on: April 06, 2017, 04:47:20 PM »
Etienne

That sounds pretty good to me. One simple trick we use for thirsty crops like pumpkins squashes and courgettes (zucchini) is to cut the bottom off a 2 liter plastic water bottle, embed the neck in the soil near the roots and use it as a reservoir to water the plants. Examples here for courgettes:


silkman

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #456 on: April 06, 2017, 05:12:08 PM »
Call me old-fashioned but I planted first early potatoes today in a trench accompanied by some well rotted farmyard manure  - exactly the way my Dad taught me to in the late 50's.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2017, 09:26:53 PM by silkman »

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #457 on: April 06, 2017, 08:34:51 PM »
Well, you're lucky that somebody taught you how to do it. In my family, there is a generation gap. My parents only did the easy gardening (things like buying tomatoes plant and putting them in the garden). When I see all the problems I have, like that the birds just ate half of the spinach during the last two days, I protected them today with wire mesh, but the holes are too big, I have to buy something with smaler holes quite fast otherwise I'll have to start it all over. At least I know now who is guilty. If one day there is a war, it will be over before people know how to grow their food.

Neven

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #458 on: April 07, 2017, 08:50:35 AM »
Call me old-fashioned but I planted first early potatoes today in a trench accompanied by some well rotted farmyard mature  - exactly the way my Dad taught me to in the late 50's.

Our soil is still too hard, and so we're trying the mulch routine, just laying the potatoes on the ground and cover them with hay. Luckily it rained that very same evening. We'll see what happens.
Il faut cultiver notre jardin

DrTskoul

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #459 on: April 07, 2017, 12:26:04 PM »
Call me old-fashioned but I planted first early potatoes today in a trench accompanied by some well rotted farmyard mature  - exactly the way my Dad taught me to in the late 50's.

Our soil is still too hard, and so we're trying the mulch routine, just laying the potatoes on the ground and cover them with hay. Luckily it rained that very same evening. We'll see what happens.
Is your soil clay content too high?
“You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts.”
― Richard P. Feynman

Neven

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #460 on: April 07, 2017, 12:32:06 PM »
Is your soil clay content too high?

Yes, very high. And it used to be agricultural land (Schnitzelcorn as I call it), so it's going to take a while to restore that layer of humus. But mulching really helps. That layer has been on since October, and the soil beneath was a lot softer, with big earthworms crawling around.
Il faut cultiver notre jardin

DrTskoul

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #461 on: April 07, 2017, 12:47:24 PM »
Is your soil clay content too high?

Yes, very high. And it used to be agricultural land (Schnitzelcorn as I call it), so it's going to take a while to restore that layer of humus. But mulching really helps. That layer has been on since October, and the soil beneath was a lot softer, with big earthworms crawling around.

Increasing the sand content will help tremendously.  Aggressive mixing is too much work but if you have patience you can spread sand gradually with mulch. This will separate the clay particles and make the soil more permeable.

On the other hand just wood chips according to the attached information works great
« Last Edit: April 07, 2017, 01:05:42 PM by DrTskoul »
“You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts.”
― Richard P. Feynman

mati

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #462 on: April 07, 2017, 11:50:20 PM »
sorry but i could not another place to let you know that life is fine ...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJ4Mm8alM6I
and so it goes

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #463 on: April 08, 2017, 08:33:54 AM »

On the other hand just wood chips according to the attached information works great

The other pages she wrote are also very interesting :
https://puyallup.wsu.edu/lcs/

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #464 on: April 08, 2017, 01:55:34 PM »
Hello,

Here are my spinach with the bird protection I built around them.


I had some wire mesh for fence left. Don't know if the birds still eat as much when the leaves are taller.

Bye,

Etienne

DrTskoul

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #465 on: April 08, 2017, 02:55:52 PM »
Hello,

Here are my spinach with the bird protection I built around them.


I had some wire mesh for fence left. Don't know if the birds still eat as much when the leaves are taller.

Bye,

Etienne

Ha.. I had such arrangement for my tomatoes years ago, but the squirrel chewed through. :)
“You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts.”
― Richard P. Feynman

Neven

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #466 on: April 08, 2017, 04:02:50 PM »

On the other hand just wood chips according to the attached information works great

The other pages she wrote are also very interesting :
https://puyallup.wsu.edu/lcs/

Very interesting website, indeed.

I'm fine with how things are going, just letting things grow and then mowing it and leaving it in place. But I might throw some woodchips and sand around (if I can find sand I can trust).
Il faut cultiver notre jardin

Bruce Steele

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #467 on: April 08, 2017, 04:34:45 PM »
I think wood chips are great for mulching trees , like the WSU site said , but I would be careful about digging in chips before they have been well composted if you are going to use them to build garden soil for vegetables. Bacteria will begin to compost your chips if dug in and they will borrow nitrogen in the process . This can leave your soil lacking in nutrients for a couple years until the composting is complete, dependent upon warmth and soil moisture. For vegetable gardens you should compost first then add them in.
 If you have extra land that you don't plan on putting into garden for several years spreading chips will control weeds and built soil organics, but it takes time. Wood shavings are used for horse stalls and they are plentiful and free . They come with manure and urea but usually even after composting they require some added nitrogen for a balanced soil additive. So adding some other manure , like chicken, before composting will speed up the process and result in a better final product.

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #468 on: May 13, 2017, 10:14:16 AM »
Hello,

To start with the beginning, I had a summer compost and a winter compost. The summercompost (spring material) was very fine at the end of the winter and the side of the garden where I strewed it grows very well. The winter compost (fall material) wasn't so well finished when I strewed it in March, but I thought it could keep composting on site.

Composting on site doesn't seem to work so well, and I have for example the oinons that get yellow (see picture). Does anybody has a clue of what I should do ? Or would there be another reason for yellow onions ? Salad and spinach seems to grow very well on that not finished compost, but radish and cabbadge not so well. I have the feeling that it dries out quite fast.

Thanks for your ideas.

Etienne

silkman

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #469 on: May 13, 2017, 03:10:39 PM »
Hi Etienne

Good compost needs self-generated heat and if you spread it it won't work so well.

Onions are hungry little beasts. Yours look perfectly healthy to me - no sign of rust which is a real problem here - but if the compost isn't providing the nutrients they'll need a feed. The easy way is to give them a dose of a general purpose fertiliser but if you want to be totally green, liquid manure made from something like comfrey (http://www.allotment-garden.org/comfrey/comfrey-compost-feed-tea/) would do the trick.

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #470 on: May 14, 2017, 09:12:19 AM »
Hello Silkmann,

Thank you for the information. Since you believe that they look healty, I'll wait a little bit more to see how it evolves. When roots get longer, nutrients should become available.
Regarding the use of comfrey to accelerate the composting process, I believe that mine is just too dry. I just filled yesterday a compost tank and always mix it completely before leaving it for composting, and I found totally dry areas in it.

Bye

Etienne

H2O world

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #471 on: May 14, 2017, 11:13:05 PM »
hi Etienne,

No offense but I think your onions look a bit nitrogen deprived. I would give them a dose of compost tea loaded with mycorrhizae and beneficial fungus. I brew my own and would be happy to give you the recipe if interested. I have been an organic gardener for many years. Pay attention to the roots and you will always get healthier plants. I feed them with mycorrhizae and supportive fungus, the microbes live in and on the roots breaking down soil allowing the plant more access to the nutrients.
Never argue with stupid people they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.   
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johnm33

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #472 on: May 15, 2017, 01:36:30 PM »
H2O world" I brew my own and would be happy to give you the recipe if interested."
I'm interested too, as a novice I need all the help I can get.
john

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #473 on: May 15, 2017, 10:13:08 PM »
Hi H2O world,

Nitrogen deprived would be normal since they grow on unfinished compost, and if I understood well, nitrogen is only given back when composting is finished. Yes, the reciepe interesses me.

Etienne

H2O world

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #474 on: May 16, 2017, 11:47:55 PM »
Sorry it took me a while to get back! Here is my recipe

pH 6.5 water @ 70 degrees. 

In a 5 Gal bucket:

5 Gal pH'd water
1/2 tsp Hi Brix unsulphured molasses
1 cup worm castings (make sure its high quality)
1 cup high quality compost (the best compost is leaf compost)
1/2 cup Alfalfa meal (very high in N, omit for fruiting or flowering plants)
2 Tbs Alaskan Humus or 60 ml liquid Humic acid
2 Tbs Bounty Fungal activator
3 Tbs low N bat guano
60 ml fish emulsion

Add liquid ingredients to the pH'd water, stir. Fill the dry ingredients into a painters bag. Aerate for 24-48 hours using a air stone. Use it right away, don't take a chance on bad bacteria using old tea.
Never argue with stupid people they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.   
- Mark Twain

H2O world

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #475 on: May 16, 2017, 11:50:10 PM »
Also.... to use dilute tea 1 gal of tea to 10 gallons of water
Never argue with stupid people they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.   
- Mark Twain