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Author Topic: Gardening  (Read 96520 times)

mati

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #400 on: March 18, 2017, 03:06:15 PM »
and so it goes

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #401 on: March 18, 2017, 03:52:06 PM »
Well, it's not really a hole in the plant. Here is a scan of 2 leaves :


Furthermore, it's a little bit too early for bugs problems. I live in Luxembourg.

Looking at the scanned leaves, maybe it looks like a bird would have bitten it.

Etienne

magnamentis

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #402 on: March 18, 2017, 04:33:23 PM »
Hello,

My plants are eaten each year the same way, I though it was by mice, but I talked about it with somebody who tolb me that mice eat mainly roots.

Does any body has an idea what animal eats plants that way ?


The plant is sorrel, so I should have big leaves.

Later in the year, the same animal prefers other plants, so the problem moves on the other vegetables.

Thanks,

Etienne

Escargots ?
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etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #403 on: March 18, 2017, 09:52:12 PM »
Escargots ?

I don't believe so, I think that it is too early. I haven't seen any this year and they wouldn't leave so much food behind. Sorrel is really the first eatable (kids won't agree with the eatable concept) thing to come out in the spring. Crocus are still blooming in the garden, rhubarb leaves are not visible yet. My problem is not to save the sorrel, but to save what comes after. Once other vegetables are available, it's not eaten anymore.

thanks,

Etienne

Bruce Steele

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #404 on: March 19, 2017, 03:56:57 AM »
Etienne, It looks like bird damage to me also. Getting early peas up often results in similar damage .
If you keep an eye out you should be able to spot the culprits. Wire cages will probably fix the problem and if you leave some plants out without protection and see reoccurring damage you will get some confirmation.

Clare

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #405 on: March 19, 2017, 05:52:39 AM »
Yes I'd agree with Bruce, here I see/get similar damage particularly by sparrows. Also in the garden section at a local store I see flocks who feed the tops of the lettuce plants off there all the time.
You would all laugh to see it - my vege garden always looks a lot like a battle zone, not anything like those gorgeous pics in the garden mags. I have plants netted, caged with all sorts of 'found' (= untidy looking )wire baskets, rows of seedlings under pegged strips of plastic gutter guard, ... I love having birds around so wont have a cat but then have to do this.
 :)
Clare

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #406 on: March 19, 2017, 07:18:31 AM »
Thanks for the information. Does anybody has any experience with bird scarer ? On Wikipedia, they have a picture of a stationary modelled owl used as a bird scarer. Would that work ? It would be easier and look better than wire mesh and plastic foils.

Etienne

mati

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #407 on: March 19, 2017, 08:25:16 PM »
they work for a while,
but birds are smart and will realize it is not alive
try a motion activated sprinkler :)
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Avalonian

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #408 on: March 19, 2017, 10:32:55 PM »
The ones they call 'dogs' seem to work exceedingly well, based on experience with our community orchard... but of course they're a bit more maintainance than a plastic peregrine.

Neven

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #409 on: March 19, 2017, 10:46:06 PM »
How about some old CDs on a string? I never tried it, but I'm still in the process of attracting birds to my 2/3 acre.
Il faut cultiver notre jardin

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #410 on: March 20, 2017, 09:56:18 AM »
I asked in the village, and people seem to use gardening textile to protect vegetables. I just wonder if this doesn't protect slugs from predators. Right now, slugs are not awake, so in the early spring, this could be a solution. Rhubarb leaves are just coming out right now.

Maybe I need to have some patience. A magpie just buit a nest near the garden, maybe wildlife has to adapt itself to the new situation. I moved in only 2 years ago, and the former owner seems to have used chemicals when gardening.

The old CD method would be very good to protect cherries, but I don't know about salads. I never tried myself, I don't know if it would scare the magpie which would be a bad news in this context.

silkman

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #411 on: March 20, 2017, 09:44:49 PM »
Netting😊

TerryM

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #412 on: March 21, 2017, 03:16:34 AM »
Beautiful Silkman


Terry

Red

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #413 on: March 27, 2017, 07:54:30 PM »
I asked in the village, and people seem to use gardening textile to protect vegetables. I just wonder if this doesn't protect slugs from predators. Right now, slugs are not awake, so in the early spring, this could be a solution. Rhubarb leaves are just coming out right now.

Maybe I need to have some patience. A magpie just buit a nest near the garden, maybe wildlife has to adapt itself to the new situation. I moved in only 2 years ago, and the former owner seems to have used chemicals when gardening.

The old CD method would be very good to protect cherries, but I don't know about salads. I never tried myself, I don't know if it would scare the magpie which would be a bad news in this context.
Crushed egg shells in a line around your garden works well to stop slugs. Takes a lot of shells to go anywhere though. Beer in saucers works pretty well to and easier to find a lot. The slugs like beer just make it deep enough and they will drown.

mati

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #414 on: March 27, 2017, 09:07:22 PM »
are slugs edible?
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Neven

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #415 on: March 27, 2017, 09:23:11 PM »
You have to remove the intestines, as they apparently give the slugs a horrible, bitter taste.  If you could eat them just like that, I'd never have to go to a supermarket again. But then again, ducks eat them, and you can eat the ducks.

As for slug solutions, it depends on how many are plaguing your premises. There is no way I could keep out the local Army of Darkness (as I call them) with egg shells, never mind the fact that my vegetable garden is 500 square feet. And beer traps just lure them in.

So, what I did, was build an electric fence with two stainless steel wires attached to 6 rechargeable batteries and a red LED as a resistor. The 6-7 Volts keep most of the slugs out, killing the small ones (sorry, little buddies!).

This month I have built a couple of cold frames. Last night it was -4 °C, but with a blanket over it, the temperature in the cold frame remained stable at 1.2 °C. Unfortunately, my wife forgot to open them yesterday, and half the plants died from the greenhouse effect (38 °C).

But all in all, it should help us plant things earlier.
Il faut cultiver notre jardin

sesyf

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #416 on: March 27, 2017, 09:29:51 PM »
Silkman, and others: you need to be careful with those nets as birds can get caught in them. I've seen such things in neighbours garden long time ago... especially when bushes started to have the berries...

Red

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #417 on: March 27, 2017, 09:33:10 PM »
are slugs edible?
I'm not sure I would eat them. The ones found in my area have a parasite in the slime trail they leave behind. It causes liver flukes in cattle and goats. The cattle form a cyst around the fluke and that is the end of it. However this doesn't happen with goats, as a result during very wet springs and summers I had some serious infections in my dairy goats that required antibiotics. Needless to say this was always a pain for someone trying to stay away from these things.

silkman

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #418 on: March 27, 2017, 09:55:45 PM »
Sesyf

I can honestly say that in many years of vegetable gardening I've never knowingly killed a bird with a net. The only species interested in getting at my brassicas are Wood Pigeons and they are big enough to look after themselves. I use cheap plastic nets to keep them at bay. The truth is that, without the nets, there are no sprouts for Sunday lunch.

As you rightly say, soft fruit bushes are more of a challenge as they do attract lots of interest from a range of smaller birds. So to protect our precious currants and berries I use much more expensive soft woven nets that don't seem to cause any problems. I do on occasion have to rescue the odd well fed finch that has found its way in but can't get out again though!