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Archimid

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #500 on: June 30, 2017, 10:58:21 PM »
Neven, I feel the same way about leafy greens and other colder weather produce. It is simply too hot and they end up tasting bitter. I can never have some of the wonderful produce that you guys post all the time.  I learned that the hard way.
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silkman

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #501 on: July 01, 2017, 10:17:18 AM »
But you have mangoes! I can only dream. I'd swap you for a cabbage any day!

That said, I've just stripped Virginia Creeper off a south-facing wall and planted two vines. Cheshire Chardonnay? Probably not, but given the direction of travel we might we might as well go with the flow.

Clare

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #502 on: July 13, 2017, 03:02:47 AM »
Winter has arrrived & it's cold here, too cold to work outside. So time to look at gardening online:
Here's a pic & link to the Inuvik Community Greenhouse 200 mile inside the Arctic Circle:
https://www.inuvikgreenhouse.com/

Clare

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #503 on: July 13, 2017, 03:09:53 AM »
This doco about Singapore shows some pretty amazing ideas, the future of gardening?
"From vertical farms to living buildings, Singapore is on the cutting edge of environmentally sustainable urban solutions that have the best interest of the country's future at heart."
http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/earthrise/2017/05/singapore-asia-greenest-city-170531102946823.html

(I confess to like getting my hands in the soil)

Neven

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #504 on: July 13, 2017, 09:26:04 AM »
Winter has arrrived & it's cold here, too cold to work outside. So time to look at gardening online:
Here's a pic & link to the Inuvik Community Greenhouse 200 mile inside the Arctic Circle:
https://www.inuvikgreenhouse.com/

For a second I thought that was your greenhouse, Clare!  :o
Il faut cultiver notre jardin

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #505 on: August 03, 2017, 02:00:24 PM »
Hello,
I have some kind of white "foam" on the ground and on some salads in one part of my garden. It is in the part I opened this spring in order to plant potatoes. I have placed a lot of grass clipping on the potatoes.
Now that we ate the first potatoes, I planted salads instead and there is some kind of white foam develops itself on the ground and on the salads. when I crush it, it is dark inside. I first though it was birds excrements. If anybody knows what this could be ?
Thanks, best regards,
Etienne

ghoti

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #506 on: August 03, 2017, 08:45:43 PM »
Spittlebugs or Froghopper perhaps?

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #507 on: August 04, 2017, 08:29:09 AM »
Well, I believe that it goes more in the fungus direction. Wonder if it is not related to rotted grass clipping.

silkman

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #508 on: August 04, 2017, 09:02:54 AM »
Etienne

The photo isn't too clear but it definitely looks fungal to me. I'd be interested to hear how well your potatoes did before you planted the latest crop.

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #509 on: August 04, 2017, 03:11:57 PM »
Hi,
Here is a much better picture. My mobile only has a VGA quality. The white stuff is still growing and I don't think I will eat the concerned salads.

Potatoes where ok. There weren't too many because of the lack of rain during the spring. A few had small holes that where like rotten, but nothing spectacular. I used mildew resistant potatoes this hear but even so, I believe that some plants had some mildew, it just didn't go everywhere like last year.

This white stuff is only in the areas where grass clipping doesn't cover the ground anymore, which is the case mainly were potatoes have been removed.

If anybody knows what to do about it...

Thank you, best regards,

Etienne

johnm33

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #510 on: August 05, 2017, 12:03:23 PM »
It does look fungal, have you had a lot of high humidity days or misty mornings? Where I've used bark/woodchips for mulch around blackcurrent bushes the wooden bits develop a similar white mould.
I've had a mouse/shrew family making themselves at home in one of my raised beds, slugs and snails almost gone.

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #511 on: August 05, 2017, 01:32:20 PM »
Yes, we had a lot of warm wet weather. I also have mushrooms between the tomatoes. I guess fungus will be always more an issue for gardening.

logicmanPatrick

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #512 on: August 05, 2017, 06:07:05 PM »
Since moving house back in February I have a garden.  The soil was thin over chalk.  (We have loads in Kent, wanna buy some?)  In some places I removed the soil down to the chalk, dug out some chalk and then put back sifted soil mixed with shop-bought compost and coconut fibre.

Only one small patch had previously been used to grow stuff.  I could tell by the fact that the soil was reasonably deep and the things I sowed there grew very nicely into a small salad plot.

I was surprised that my coriander thrives on an as yet untreated stony area.

Although my father grew stuff regularly for the table, I am no gardener.  I just read the instructions on the packet.  Apart from potatoes, which just need earthing up.  I had some small earlies - delicious with mayonnaise.

I've also had a few radishes, carrots and a very few beans,  Slugs ate the lettuce and attacked the beans.  The ants ate the slugs' leftovers!   :'(

Two questions:
1 - what kind of shotgun is best to kill slugs?

2 - what is the unidentified shrub below?








si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes

etienne

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #513 on: August 06, 2017, 12:14:39 AM »
Slugs hunt is a complicated story. I tried many things (planted sage and mint on the main path, beer...) and I spread widely anti slugs pellets (don't know  the english name) that are only harmful for slugs. Widely means at least 1 meter around the plant I wand to protect. The problem of the anti slugs pellets is that it attracks other animals (just like the beer catches many flies and wasps).

When possible like for salads, I don't plant them directly in the garden, but let them grow first in a protected area.

I plant the carrots and spinach as soon as possible, before slugs really are awake in the spring.

Some people say that the garden shoult be watered in the morning, because slugs would be more active at night. Well, when it's raining, they are active all day.

You can buy slugs wall, but a friend of mine told me that is also doesn't work 100% and it is quite expensive.

If people have other technics, please share.

Etienne

logicmanPatrick

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #514 on: August 06, 2017, 01:21:25 AM »
"You can buy slugs wall"

Nah!  Let the slugs buy their own Bl**dy wall!  ;D

Thanks for the tips, etienne.
si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes

TerryM

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #515 on: August 06, 2017, 01:45:38 AM »
"You can buy slugs wall"

Nah!  Let the slugs buy their own Bl**dy wall!  ;D

Thanks for the tips, etienne.


We'll build the wall, but we'll make them pay for it !!
Terry  8)

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #516 on: August 06, 2017, 05:50:49 AM »
Neven,
Have the slugs paid for the electric fence you built to keep the buggers out?
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silkman

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #517 on: August 06, 2017, 08:57:40 AM »
In our experience the battle with the humble slug is never ending. Building barriers just doesn't work, probably because the slimy invaders' eggs are waiting to hatch in the soil. You can see clear evidence of this if you look carefully at the base of even sound cabbages. There's always a baby slug or two tucked away. Lessons for certain politicians here in both the US and the UK.....?

Rule one is to keep your garden neat and tidy and the ground cover, other than what you intend to eat, at a minimum.

Rule two is to grow plants in pots or modules and transplant to the garden when they're more mature - works really well with brassicas and lettuce.

Rule three is not to be squeamish about eating stuff with slug damage........

Both of these are fun:

http://www.slugoff.co.uk/information/list

https://www.amazon.co.uk/50-Ways-Kill-Slug-Gardening/dp/0600608581/ref=pd_sim_14_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=KMY8QRY9P0W43W0VV8A2



« Last Edit: August 06, 2017, 09:05:29 AM by silkman »

sidd

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #518 on: August 06, 2017, 09:09:13 AM »
Chickens eat slugs. But i have had neurotic chickens tear up beds.

Most of them wander about calmly though, pecking all the while.

sidd

silkman

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #519 on: August 06, 2017, 10:08:39 AM »
Logicman

I think the shrub in your last pic is Hypericum:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypericum_androsaemum

We have it in our garden too. It's related to St John's Wort.

Neven

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #520 on: August 06, 2017, 11:13:34 AM »
Neven,
Have the slugs paid for the electric fence you built to keep the buggers out?

I sometimes find euro coins in the garden, but they may have dropped out of my own pockets.  ;)

The fence keeps out most slugs (especially the big ones), but like silkman says, just one small slug on the inside in autumn, and you'll have dozens in spring again. Also, the fence needs to be maintained, which means weed removal and checking the wires don't touch anywhere. At some point I will build an improved version. Of course, the slugs will have to pay for that one too.

One mistake we made, was keeping a couple of fixed plants like oregano - and we left some coriander standing - within the vegetable garden perimeter. Even though I had dug the garden when it started freezing at night (not happy about that, as I like the no-till philosophy for optimal soil fauna), the little buggers returned in early spring. The small white ones, not the big brown ones. Especially the coriander offered refuge, it seems.

They are mostly a problem during April, May and part of June, when seedlings are small and vulnerable. The slugs also seem more hungry and active then, and so we went out every evening with a flash light to kill as many as we could find (dozens of small ones). Then, at some point, we removed all the hay mulch, did some more hunting for three evenings, and then put new mulch in. That really helped a lot.

Now that most of the plants are big, we don't check as much. There doesn't seem to be any major damage. Flea beetles and caterpillars are more of a threat now, so we focus more on keeping them in check. We've learned a lot from last year, especially my wife, and so we recognize pests earlier, which really makes a difference. Damage seems a lot less this year.

For next year we'll remove all the fixed plants, probably do some tilling to further improve the soil, and then do the same with replacing the mulch at some point.

Speaking of hay mulch, the potatoes we planted in them were more of a success than expected. I wasn't sure if the layer of mulch was thick enough at some point, and as there's no electric fence around the potato plot, there was an orgy of huge brown slugs every evening, to the point that the plants didn't even have flowers. I checked once under the hay and there was only a hull of a potato, so I figured the harvest would basically be zero.

But turns out I was wrong. We planted 5 kg and got 40 kg out! One third of the potatoes had holes in them, some of them still containing burrowing slugs, but the rest looked pretty sound. Too bad we don't have a good way to store them. Looks like we'll have to build a small root cellar at some point.

Next year we'll use even more hay mulch, and maybe get some ducks. I'm quite pleased this works, as digging potatoes is quite a lot of work.
Il faut cultiver notre jardin

silkman

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #521 on: August 06, 2017, 12:07:08 PM »
Excellent job, Neven!

Just remember the old joke - What's worse than finding a slug in your salad?.......... finding half a slug!😉

FishOutofWater

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #522 on: August 08, 2017, 02:36:03 AM »
Not a garden yet, but these are the first two mangoes from my tree. I'm proud of them and wanted to share them with you.

they look like cut from a spanish bull LOL ...SNIP

They sure weren't cut from The Donald.

My Haden mango tree didn't produce fruit until it was about 10 feet tall when I lived on Kauai. It's bizarre having such large mangoes on such a small tree.

Archimid

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #523 on: August 09, 2017, 01:27:53 AM »
Yeah I was surprised too. The tree is only 2 years old, but it is a grafted tree. Maybe that's why it fruited so young.  But I'm not complaining, they were delicious.
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