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Author Topic: Solar Roadways  (Read 16711 times)

crandles

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Re: Solar Roadways
« Reply #100 on: April 26, 2017, 03:41:02 PM »

World’s first solar road opens in France: It’s ridiculously expensive
Kilometer-long road cost $5.2 million to build.

it is one lane and provides enough power equal to the demand for street lighting.

but the economics of this is actually in the investment of long-life pavers, not energy.

A typical city street (2 lane) costs about $250,000 per km/lane to strip and resurface.  So if the panels last 20 years (doubtful) then a large portion of the cost is offset from maintenance savings. 


The cost to construct one lane-mile of a typical 4-lane divided highway can range from $3.1 million to $9.1 million per lane-mile in rural areas depending on terrain type

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1520537

5.2M per km works out to 8.3M per km but if that has constructed 2 lanes that seems fairly near low end of 3.1-9.1M range. What is not clear is if the costs quoted are for all the same things, land acquisition could be around half of the 3.1-9.1 but not included in the 5.2 so it is a bit of a guessing game as to what is included.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Solar Roadways
« Reply #101 on: April 26, 2017, 04:13:06 PM »
From the Solar Roadways info page on Heating:

Powering

The electronics in Solar Roadways® are divided into separate systems. Each panel's heating element and LEDs are driven by the grid/storage system, not by the solar cells directly. The solar cells place the harvested energy on the grid/storage system. The systems are independent of one another. This is important because the heaters/LEDs must work at night when the solar cells are incapable of producing power.

The heaters only have to keep the surface warm enough to prevent snow/ice accumulation. The panels will not be heated to the extent of being warm to the touch. This saves energy and therefore capital for the end user.

The amount of power required by the heaters depends on the ambient temperature and the amount of precipitation. The heaters will only be on when they are needed. The heaters automatically engage when there is precipitation or snow drifts. No matter the ambient temperature, the heaters only need to engage when conditions are both below freezing and there is precipitation. The microprocessor has an uplink to a local weather station to predict precipitation events.

For those who live in the northern climates, the implementation of SR provides added safety and eliminates the expense and inconvenience of snow plows, shoveling, and road chemicals. Those in warm climates won't need the heating feature currently, but due to changing weather patterns, all panels are equipped with heating elements at no extra cost.
http://www.solarroadways.com/Specifics/Heating
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Bob Wallace

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Re: Solar Roadways
« Reply #102 on: April 26, 2017, 04:51:05 PM »
France paved a road with solar panels

https://arstechnica.com/cars/2016/12/worlds-first-solar-road-opens-in-france/

World’s first solar road opens in France: It’s ridiculously expensive
Kilometer-long road cost $5.2 million to build.

it is one lane and provides enough power equal to the demand for street lighting.

but the economics of this is actually in the investment of long-life pavers, not energy.

A typical city street (2 lane) costs about $250,000 per km/lane to strip and resurface.  So if the panels last 20 years (doubtful) then a large portion of the cost is offset from maintenance savings.  If they are safer, provide self cleaning (snow) and some power then that would be additional savings.

I have always suspected that if this technology is to work it would be implemented on Route 66 in the southern united states.

So many issues with solar roads.

I'm going to throw this quote into the mix.  I'm not ready to stand behind it because I haven't spent time reading multiple sources but it doesn't sound wrong to me...

Concrete pavement's life can range anywhere from 20-40 years.  But when you factor in annual maintenance, asphalt pavement can cost four to seven times as much money to maintain

If that's the case and the desire is to support driving on solar panels because they will last longer than asphalt then we need to throw concrete into the mix.  Often we don't pave with concrete because of the upfront cost.  Solar panels on the road would cost a lot more than asphalt so best to compare them to concrete. 

BTW, I suspect maintenance costs for solar roads will be considerable.  Where the panels are mounted and the stress that will be placed on them will be considerable.

Bob Wallace

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Re: Solar Roadways
« Reply #103 on: April 26, 2017, 05:01:27 PM »
it is one lane and provides enough power equal to the demand for street lighting

There is no way that the road panels will produce enough power to offset their need for power in order to melt snow in an area that has "winter". 

There are multiple companies manufacturing and selling standalone street lamps that have their own solar panels and battery packs.

--

Looking at the 'panels that melted the snow' picture posted a couple of comments up.  Notice how the snow is melted only over the active panels?  That tells us that all the panels will have to be operating in order to keep the roadway snow/ice free.  If one or a few panels cease to function then the maintenance crew is going to be out there, detouring traffic, and replacing panels. 


Sigmetnow

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Re: Solar Roadways
« Reply #104 on: July 04, 2017, 04:24:01 PM »
Solar Roadways news:

New Solar Roadways mini doc released today from National Geographic. We are honored to have been chosen as one of their Chasing Genius stories. They wrote that each of the stories "demonstrates how the spark of an idea can become a force for change in the world". As you watch the ending, think about how our lives could be if we collectively decide to implement SR on a grand scale. Imagine a road trip with an autonomous, electric vehicle being charged dynamically as you go on roads that remain snow/ice free and have LED lines and signage.

We are now ready to move to full production so we can begin to accept the customers who have reached out to us from all 50 states and virtually every country in the world. We are now talking with interested investors to raise $15 million for full production and looking at a franchise model to allow quick implementation and production in every country. If you would like to help us make the world a safer and greener place there are many ways to join us on this journey:

Customers@SolarRoadways.com
Careers@SolarRoadways.com
Donations@SolarRoadways.com
Investors@SolarRoadways.com
Distributors@SolarRoadways.com
Students@SolarRoadways.com

#SolarRoadways #ClimateChange #Solar #RenewableEnergy #GoGreen #DriveGreen #Roads #ParkingLots #Driveways #Airports #BikePaths #SportsCourts #Crosswalks #Sidewalks #EV #AutonomousVehicle #ChasingGenius #NatGeo
https://www.facebook.com/solarroadways/posts/10154396258017126

The 3-minute National Geographic video: http://www.natgeochasinggenius.com/preroll?video=7
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.