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Author Topic: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)  (Read 21878 times)

TerryM

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Re: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
« Reply #150 on: December 04, 2018, 09:56:58 PM »

In other words, if a block breaks on the patio, the house will not fall down. Applications like reinforced concrete or mix poured from trucks are more complicated with more complex regulation and, thus, for down the road.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/02/climate/betting-on-a-new-way-to-make-concrete-that-doesnt-pollute.html#click=https://t.co/xuFTnPiBFn

Has anyone ever heard of a house falling down because "a block breaks on the patio"?


This sounds increasingly like another Green Tech scheme to suck up more dollars from well meaning dolts.


In days gone by the pitchmen stayed close to the Big Top as the Circus wended it's way through rural America, relying on the Circus's mobility to protect them from mounting scrutiny. Increasingly they dangle their green tinged baubles in front of the credulous, believing that their evident good intentions will protect them from litigation.


I don't wish them well on their journey
Terry


Sigmetnow

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Re: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
« Reply #151 on: December 04, 2018, 10:14:45 PM »

In other words, if a block breaks on the patio, the house will not fall down. Applications like reinforced concrete or mix poured from trucks are more complicated with more complex regulation and, thus, for down the road.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/02/climate/betting-on-a-new-way-to-make-concrete-that-doesnt-pollute.html#click=https://t.co/xuFTnPiBFn

Has anyone ever heard of a house falling down because "a block breaks on the patio"?


This sounds increasingly like another Green Tech scheme to suck up more dollars from well meaning dolts.


In days gone by the pitchmen stayed close to the Big Top as the Circus wended it's way through rural America, relying on the Circus's mobility to protect them from mounting scrutiny. Increasingly they dangle their green tinged baubles in front of the credulous, believing that their evident good intentions will protect them from litigation.


I don't wish them well on their journey
Terry

Terry,
The reasoning is that the new concrete can be used in non-support functions like pavers, to prove that the new process works, while not risking lives as part of a building or bridge!

If the pavers hold up well, more investment will be put into trying different mixtures and tweaking the process, and further testing that eventually allows the process to be used on much larger, load-bearing structures.  If the process works as CO2 storage and is structurally sound, the entire industry could change, thus significantly lowering its carbon emissions.

Pavers, then bricks, is the perfect way to test out what may become an industry technology upheaval.  If the new concrete starts to crumble after a few years, no harm done except to the pocketbooks of a few early adopters.
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

SteveMDFP

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Re: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
« Reply #152 on: December 04, 2018, 10:20:25 PM »
”If Solidia’s concrete-making technology succeeds in gaining traction around the world, it could be a way of binding up large quantities of carbon dioxide in roads and other structures.”

Betting on a new way to make concrete that doesn’t pollute

I was interested in the underlying chemistry of this product.  Details here:
http://solidiatech.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Solidia-Technologies-Science-Backgrounder-Jan-2017-FINAL.pdf

It's not carbon-neutral cement, but it's a very big step in the right direction.


Richard Rathbone

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Re: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
« Reply #153 on: December 05, 2018, 03:04:33 AM »
Another reason for using it in pavers is likely that they don't use reinforcement.

Carbonation of Portland cement happens in place over periods of years to decades and makes steel reinforcement vulnerable to corrosion once the carbonation reaction has penetrated far enough into the concrete. https://www.understanding-cement.com/carbonation.html Solidia cement starts ready carbonated.

I don't see anything in the Solidia materials that says the different chemistry of their cement makes for better corrosion resistance, and if it did, I'd expect them to be trumpeting it as an advantage.

Juan C. García

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Re: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
« Reply #154 on: March 01, 2019, 10:53:20 PM »
Quote
A company called Blue Planet is converting carbon dioxide into building material

https://www.yaleclimateconnections.org/2019/02/company-converts-carbon-dioxide-into-building-material/
Which is the best answer to Sep-2012 ASI lost (compared to 1979-2000)?
50% [NSIDC Extent] or
73% [PIOMAS Volume]

Volume is harder to measure than extent, but 3-dimensional space is real, 2D's hide ~50% thickness gone.
-> IPCC/NSIDC trends [based on extent] underestimate the real speed of ASI lost.