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Author Topic: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)  (Read 23844 times)

Tom_Mazanec

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« Last Edit: April 27, 2019, 06:35:25 PM by Tom_Mazanec »
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

vox_mundi

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Re: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
« Reply #151 on: May 03, 2019, 03:33:28 PM »
Department of Justice Opens Investigation Into Failed Carbon-Capture Plant 
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2019/05/department-of-justice-opens-investigation-into-failed-carbon-capture-plant/

Earlier this week, the Department of Justice (DOJ) notified Southern Company that it is opening an investigation "related to the Kemper County energy facility," according to Southern's most recent financial statement (PDF).

The Mississippi-based facility had received $387 million in federal grants to build a state-of-the-art coal gasification and carbon-capture power plant (otherwise known as an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, or IGCC, plant). But in 2017, Southern's subsidiary, Mississippi Power, decided to scrap the cutting-edge tech and only use the power plant to burn cheaper natural gas, in a major blow to the proponents of carbon capture.



Kemper was a complicated project. It was located near a lignite coal mine, which was intended to serve Kemper exclusively. Lignite is a low-grade coal compared to the anthracite and bituminous coal that's found in Wyoming and Montana, so Kemper planned to synthetically transform the plentiful local coal to gas. The plant would then burn the syngas in a turbine, strip the carbon dioxide (CO2) from the power plant's flue, and send that CO2 through a pipeline to an oilfield where it would be used for enhanced oil recovery. (That is, CO2 is forced down into an oil well to increase the pressure of the well so more oil can be recovered.)

In theory, Kemper's complicated process was supposed to help it compete with other nearby coal plants because it could use lower-grade local coal, and the captured carbon would be used to increase oil field returns.

But in practice, Kemper proved to be an expensive boondoggle.
It came online just as natural gas prices were falling to a point when burning natural gas was simply cheaper than relying on any type of coal, local or not. The plant ran more than $4 billion over budget before the Mississippi Public Service Commission made clear to the company that Kemper would need to pursue a more affordable solution for Mississippi customers.

... And now, renewables are cheaper than natural gas.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

FrostKing70

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Re: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
« Reply #152 on: May 03, 2019, 04:30:22 PM »
That is news to me, would you please provide a reference for renewables being cheaper than natural gas?

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
« Reply #153 on: May 03, 2019, 04:42:19 PM »
Renewables ‘Have Won the Race’ against Coal and Are Starting to Beat Natural Gas

By Joe Romm, originally published by Climate Progress (April 4, 2019)
Quote
… according to a report released this week by Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF).
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

FrostKing70

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Re: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
« Reply #154 on: May 03, 2019, 05:23:57 PM »
Thank you for the link, I missed that one some how!

I find the low CO2 concrete interesting, creating the mix 200 to 250 degrees lower should have a significant impact on emissions, regardless of the CO2 used to cure it.  I've downloaded the document and sent it to some friends at work to see if we can use this material!