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Author Topic: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)  (Read 47949 times)

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  • Nilas ice
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Re: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
« Reply #300 on: February 09, 2021, 06:30:13 PM »
once to extract the fossil fuels and burn them
and again to pay for poor health and reduced productivity
and again to pay for extreme weather damage hurricane, flood, drought
and again to pay for sea level rise
and again to clean it out of the atmosphere
and again to shutter the old drilling and mining sites
and again .....


The burden that keeps on taking (as compared to the gift that keeps on giving)

vox_mundi

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Re: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
« Reply #301 on: February 15, 2021, 09:59:10 PM »
Corn Belt Farmland Has Lost a Third of Its Carbon-Rich Soil
https://phys.org/news/2021-02-corn-belt-farmland-lost-carbon-rich.html

More than one-third of the Corn Belt in the Midwest—nearly 100 million acres—has completely lost its carbon-rich topsoil, according to University of Massachusetts Amherst research that indicates the U.S. Department of Agricultural has significantly underestimated the true magnitude of farmland erosion.

In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers led by UMass Amherst graduate student Evan Thaler, along with professors Isaac Larsen and Qian Yu in the department of geosciences, developed a method using satellite imagery to map areas in agricultural fields in the Corn Belt of the Midwestern U.S. that have no remaining A-horizon soil. The A-horizon is the upper portion of the soil that is rich in organic matter, which is critical for plant growth because of its water and nutrient retention properties. The researchers then used high-resolution elevation data to extrapolate the satellite measurements across the Corn Belt and the true magnitude of erosion.

Productive agricultural soils are vital for producing food for a growing global population and for sustaining rural economies. However, degradation of soil quality by erosion reduces crop yields. Thaler and his colleagues estimate that erosion of the A-horizon has reduced corn and soybean yields by about 6%, leading to nearly $3 billion in annual economic losses for farmers across the Midwest.

The A-horizon has primarily been lost on hilltops and ridgelines, which indicates that tillage erosion—downslope movement of soil by repeated plowing—is a major driver of soil loss in the Midwest. Notably, tillage erosion is not included in national assessments of soil loss and the research highlights the urgent need to include tillage erosion in the soil erosion models that are used in the U.S. and to incentivize adoption of no-till farming methods.

Further, their research suggests erosion has removed nearly 1.5 petagrams of carbon from hillslopes. Restoration of organic carbon to the degraded soils by switching from intensive conventional agricultural practices to soil-regenerative practices, has potential to sequester carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while restoring soil productivity.

Evan A. Thaler el al., "The extent of soil loss across the US Corn Belt," PNAS (2021).
https://www.pnas.org/content/118/8/e1922375118
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

morganism

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Re: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
« Reply #302 on: April 05, 2021, 12:54:20 AM »
 A single-component water-lean post-combustion CO2 capture solvent

"Notably, it is projected that this solvent can operate at a regeneration heat rate of 2.0 GJ per tonne CO2 for post-combustion capture, and at a total cost of capture of $50.6/tonne CO2. With further process optimization significant reductions in the capture cost are predicted."

https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2020/ee/d0ee02585b#!divAbstract

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  • Nilas ice
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Re: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
« Reply #303 on: April 05, 2021, 03:59:32 PM »
A single-component water-lean post-combustion CO2 capture solvent

"Notably, it is projected that this solvent can operate at a regeneration heat rate of 2.0 GJ per tonne CO2 for post-combustion capture, and at a total cost of capture of $50.6/tonne CO2. With further process optimization significant reductions in the capture cost are predicted."

https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2020/ee/d0ee02585b#!divAbstract


Things to note
this is a lab experiment and cost projections from these are notoriously bad at missing costs.
A mwh produced from coal results in a ton of CO2 which requires 1/2 of mwh to sequester. The net result is a mwh of usable energy from coal would require the production of 2 mwh of energy and add $101 dollars to the cost of 1 mwh of usable energy. A mwh produced from solar and stored on lithium ion battery would be cheaper.
This process only removes 97% of the CO2.
A mwh produced from natural gas results in 0.45 tons of CO2 which requires 0.225 mwh to sequester. One mwh of usable energy would require 1.29 mwh of energy and add $65.29 to the cost of 1 mwh of usable energy. The cos is  $109.81. With battery storage at $121.84(probably high eia numbers they have used 2017 cost estimates in 2021 analysis) and dropping.