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Author Topic: What's new in Greenland?  (Read 150067 times)

b_lumenkraft

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #400 on: April 18, 2019, 11:19:40 AM »
Oh great! Yet another positive feedback.  :-\

nukefix

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #401 on: April 18, 2019, 01:01:10 PM »
ps: GRACE Follow-On - where are you? No info from NASA or Germany since late 2018. Is it in trouble as data was promised by now.
I heard that the accelerometer on one of the satellites is kaputt. That is not good at all and will quite drastically lower the data quality compared with fully functioning GRACE  :( :( :'(

gerontocrat

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #402 on: April 18, 2019, 02:34:49 PM »
ps: GRACE Follow-On - where are you? No info from NASA or Germany since late 2018. Is it in trouble as data was promised by now.
I heard that the accelerometer on one of the satellites is kaputt. That is not good at all and will quite drastically lower the data quality compared with fully functioning GRACE  :( :( :'(
The launch was a few months late.
One of the instruments on one of the satellites failed and they switched to a backup.
Looks OK now for data release starting in the summer.

The German Institute gives the most detailed info -

https://media.gfz-potsdam.de/gfz/sec12/pdf/GRACE_FO_SDS_newsletter_No2.pdf
Quote
GRACE Follow-On Science Team & Highlights:
On Jan 28, 2019, the mission exited Phase-D (in-orbit-checkout) and entered Phase-E and the
beginning of science operations. During the first 120 days of Phase-E, the project’s Science Data
System (JPL, CSR, GFZ) team will conduct the validation and verification of the flight system
operations and data processing approach to obtaining monthly gravity fields at a precision
equivalent to that achieved with GRACE. Preliminary results from Phase-D and early Phase-E
show that the system performance meets the Level 1 science and technology requirements of
continuity with the 15-year record from GRACE.

Since launch (May-22, 2018), GRACE-FO has collected approximately 7 months of the science
data which will be part of the first Level-1A/B data scheduled for release on or before May 28,
2019.

The Level-2 gravity products and the observations from the LRI (Laser Ranging
Interferometer) technology demonstration will be released as planned on or before July-27,
2019. The Science Data System will release the data through the US PO.DAAC
(http://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov) and the German ISDC (https://isdc.gfz-potsdam.de/grace-fo-isdc)
data portals (see important updates for PO.DAAC data access below). Detailed documentation
of the Level-1 data processing and the adopted calibration strategies will be released
concurrently with the data.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Tealight

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #403 on: April 20, 2019, 11:37:05 AM »
New Bedrock overlay page for all of Greenlands major glaciers.

https://cryospherecomputing.tk/Bedrock

b_lumenkraft

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #404 on: April 20, 2019, 01:09:32 PM »
Just awesome Tealight!

May i suggest using a bigger font and a visual separation (thin line perhaps) between the glaciers and centring of the pics. Would make it even more beautiful imho.

Shared Humanity

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #405 on: April 20, 2019, 02:13:14 PM »
New Bedrock overlay page for all of Greenlands major glaciers.

https://cryospherecomputing.tk/Bedrock

What is absolutely amazing about these overlays is that it becomes readily apparent the appearance of the surface of the ice sheet reveals the underlying bedrock. I would like to weigh in and say that nothing needs to be added to the overlay. These are perfect.

Shared Humanity

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #406 on: April 20, 2019, 02:16:32 PM »
For example, if you look at Zachariae Isstrom Glacier, melt ponds form over depressions in the bedrock.

Shared Humanity

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #407 on: April 20, 2019, 02:17:55 PM »
Tealight...you should get an award for this work.

Tealight

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #408 on: April 20, 2019, 02:50:03 PM »
Just awesome Tealight!

May i suggest using a bigger font and a visual separation (thin line perhaps) between the glaciers and centring of the pics. Would make it even more beautiful imho.

Technically all pictures are centered (if you span the browser over two monitors) The Petermann Glacier has a different aspect ratio and the image overlay code needs a point zero which is set for the widest images. So all image overlays have to begin at the same position.

I try to add a visual separation, but the font is already quite big imo. After loading the webpage from the web and not locally I noticed it has a loading time. With 20MB it's already a decent size. Thus I probably create a separate page for Antarctic Glaciers.

Tealight...you should get an award for this work.

For this? It's just using some web templates, downloading other peoples work and aligning two images in a paint program. All in all two afternoons of work.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2019, 02:59:54 PM by Tealight »

Shared Humanity

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #409 on: April 20, 2019, 03:01:47 PM »
Tealight...you should get an award for this work.

For this? It's just using some web templates, downloading other peoples work and overlaying two images in a paint program. All in all two afternoons of work.

Has anyone else done this? In my experience approaching something creatively often provides breakthroughs in understanding...for this alone, I'll give you an award. This award and $1 will get you a cup of coffee.

Stephan

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #410 on: April 20, 2019, 07:53:19 PM »
Thanks tealight. Great work, even if you didn't need weeks or months to do that.
May I kindly ask you to do the same with PIG/PIIS and Thwaites (&Haynes/Smith/Kohler/Pope) Glaciers in Antarctica? Thanks a million in advance.

Tealight

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #411 on: April 22, 2019, 12:08:53 PM »
Did anybody say their favorite glacier isn't featured? No? Well here is all of Greenland Bedrock anyway.

https://cryospherecomputing.tk/Bedrock
« Last Edit: April 22, 2019, 11:33:11 PM by Tealight »

Juan C. García

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #412 on: April 24, 2019, 03:15:19 AM »
Forty-six years of Greenland Ice Sheet mass balance from 1972 to 2018

Jérémie Mouginot, Eric Rignot, Anders A. Bjørk, Michiel van den Broeke, Romain Millan, Mathieu Morlighem, Brice Noël, Bernd Scheuchl, and Michael Wood

Quote
Abstract
We reconstruct the mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet using a comprehensive survey of thickness, surface elevation, velocity, and surface mass balance (SMB) of 260 glaciers from 1972 to 2018. We calculate mass discharge, D, into the ocean directly for 107 glaciers (85% of D) and indirectly for 110 glaciers (15%) using velocity-scaled reference fluxes. The decadal mass balance switched from a mass gain of +47 ± 21 Gt/y in 1972–1980 to a loss of 51 ± 17 Gt/y in 1980–1990. The mass loss increased from 41 ± 17 Gt/y in 1990–2000, to 187 ± 17 Gt/y in 2000–2010, to 286 ± 20 Gt/y in 2010–2018, or sixfold since the 1980s, or 80 ± 6 Gt/y per decade, on average. The acceleration in mass loss switched from positive in 2000–2010 to negative in 2010–2018 due to a series of cold summers, which illustrates the difficulty of extrapolating short records into longer-term trends. Cumulated since 1972, the largest contributions to global sea level rise are from northwest (4.4 ± 0.2 mm), southeast (3.0 ± 0.3 mm), and central west (2.0 ± 0.2 mm) Greenland, with a total 13.7 ± 1.1 mm for the ice sheet. The mass loss is controlled at 66 ± 8% by glacier dynamics (9.1 mm) and 34 ± 8% by SMB (4.6 mm). Even in years of high SMB, enhanced glacier discharge has remained sufficiently high above equilibrium to maintain an annual mass loss every year since 1998.
https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/04/16/1904242116
PNAS first published April 22, 2019 https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1904242116

Which is the best answer to Sep-2012 ASI lost (compared to 1979-2000)?
50% [NSIDC Extent] or
73% [PIOMAS Volume]

Volume is harder to measure than extent, but 3-dimensional space is real, 2D's hide ~50% thickness gone.
-> IPCC/NSIDC trends [based on extent] underestimate the real speed of ASI lost.

Tealight

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #413 on: May 04, 2019, 06:28:40 PM »
I made some glacier size comparison charts featuring Greenland & Antarctic Glaciers. I hope it better visualizes how much ice is exposed to ocean water than a Bedrock map. The charts shows the dimensions of the glacier front. Where the x-axis is the glacier width and the y-axis is the glacier height.

https://cryospherecomputing.tk/Glacier-size

BenB

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Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #414 on: May 14, 2019, 10:14:55 AM »
Poof!

12 May:


13 May:


Uummannaq Fjord system. Clearly the consistently warm weather in the west of Greenland is taking its toll on the fast ice.