Support the Arctic Sea Ice Forum and Blog

Author Topic: What's new in Greenland?  (Read 155843 times)

b_lumenkraft

  • Guest
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #400 on: April 18, 2019, 11:19:40 AM »
Oh great! Yet another positive feedback.  :-\

nukefix

  • ASIF Citizen
  • Posts: 440
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 5
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #401 on: April 18, 2019, 01:01:10 PM »
ps: GRACE Follow-On - where are you? No info from NASA or Germany since late 2018. Is it in trouble as data was promised by now.
I heard that the accelerometer on one of the satellites is kaputt. That is not good at all and will quite drastically lower the data quality compared with fully functioning GRACE  :( :( :'(

gerontocrat

  • ASIF Royalty
  • Posts: 5437
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 721
  • Likes Given: 18
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #402 on: April 18, 2019, 02:34:49 PM »
ps: GRACE Follow-On - where are you? No info from NASA or Germany since late 2018. Is it in trouble as data was promised by now.
I heard that the accelerometer on one of the satellites is kaputt. That is not good at all and will quite drastically lower the data quality compared with fully functioning GRACE  :( :( :'(
The launch was a few months late.
One of the instruments on one of the satellites failed and they switched to a backup.
Looks OK now for data release starting in the summer.

The German Institute gives the most detailed info -

https://media.gfz-potsdam.de/gfz/sec12/pdf/GRACE_FO_SDS_newsletter_No2.pdf
Quote
GRACE Follow-On Science Team & Highlights:
On Jan 28, 2019, the mission exited Phase-D (in-orbit-checkout) and entered Phase-E and the
beginning of science operations. During the first 120 days of Phase-E, the project’s Science Data
System (JPL, CSR, GFZ) team will conduct the validation and verification of the flight system
operations and data processing approach to obtaining monthly gravity fields at a precision
equivalent to that achieved with GRACE. Preliminary results from Phase-D and early Phase-E
show that the system performance meets the Level 1 science and technology requirements of
continuity with the 15-year record from GRACE.

Since launch (May-22, 2018), GRACE-FO has collected approximately 7 months of the science
data which will be part of the first Level-1A/B data scheduled for release on or before May 28,
2019.

The Level-2 gravity products and the observations from the LRI (Laser Ranging
Interferometer) technology demonstration will be released as planned on or before July-27,
2019. The Science Data System will release the data through the US PO.DAAC
(http://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov) and the German ISDC (https://isdc.gfz-potsdam.de/grace-fo-isdc)
data portals (see important updates for PO.DAAC data access below). Detailed documentation
of the Level-1 data processing and the adopted calibration strategies will be released
concurrently with the data.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Tealight

  • ASIF Citizen
  • Posts: 426
    • View Profile
    • CryosphereComputing
  • Liked: 127
  • Likes Given: 13
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #403 on: April 20, 2019, 11:37:05 AM »
New Bedrock overlay page for all of Greenlands major glaciers.

https://cryospherecomputing.tk/Bedrock

b_lumenkraft

  • Guest
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #404 on: April 20, 2019, 01:09:32 PM »
Just awesome Tealight!

May i suggest using a bigger font and a visual separation (thin line perhaps) between the glaciers and centring of the pics. Would make it even more beautiful imho.

Shared Humanity

  • ASIF Governor
  • Posts: 3609
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 210
  • Likes Given: 34
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #405 on: April 20, 2019, 02:13:14 PM »
New Bedrock overlay page for all of Greenlands major glaciers.

https://cryospherecomputing.tk/Bedrock

What is absolutely amazing about these overlays is that it becomes readily apparent the appearance of the surface of the ice sheet reveals the underlying bedrock. I would like to weigh in and say that nothing needs to be added to the overlay. These are perfect.

Shared Humanity

  • ASIF Governor
  • Posts: 3609
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 210
  • Likes Given: 34
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #406 on: April 20, 2019, 02:16:32 PM »
For example, if you look at Zachariae Isstrom Glacier, melt ponds form over depressions in the bedrock.

Shared Humanity

  • ASIF Governor
  • Posts: 3609
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 210
  • Likes Given: 34
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #407 on: April 20, 2019, 02:17:55 PM »
Tealight...you should get an award for this work.

Tealight

  • ASIF Citizen
  • Posts: 426
    • View Profile
    • CryosphereComputing
  • Liked: 127
  • Likes Given: 13
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #408 on: April 20, 2019, 02:50:03 PM »
Just awesome Tealight!

May i suggest using a bigger font and a visual separation (thin line perhaps) between the glaciers and centring of the pics. Would make it even more beautiful imho.

Technically all pictures are centered (if you span the browser over two monitors) The Petermann Glacier has a different aspect ratio and the image overlay code needs a point zero which is set for the widest images. So all image overlays have to begin at the same position.

I try to add a visual separation, but the font is already quite big imo. After loading the webpage from the web and not locally I noticed it has a loading time. With 20MB it's already a decent size. Thus I probably create a separate page for Antarctic Glaciers.

Tealight...you should get an award for this work.

For this? It's just using some web templates, downloading other peoples work and aligning two images in a paint program. All in all two afternoons of work.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2019, 02:59:54 PM by Tealight »

Shared Humanity

  • ASIF Governor
  • Posts: 3609
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 210
  • Likes Given: 34
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #409 on: April 20, 2019, 03:01:47 PM »
Tealight...you should get an award for this work.

For this? It's just using some web templates, downloading other peoples work and overlaying two images in a paint program. All in all two afternoons of work.

Has anyone else done this? In my experience approaching something creatively often provides breakthroughs in understanding...for this alone, I'll give you an award. This award and $1 will get you a cup of coffee.

Stephan

  • ASIF Middle Class
  • Posts: 530
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 101
  • Likes Given: 82
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #410 on: April 20, 2019, 07:53:19 PM »
Thanks tealight. Great work, even if you didn't need weeks or months to do that.
May I kindly ask you to do the same with PIG/PIIS and Thwaites (&Haynes/Smith/Kohler/Pope) Glaciers in Antarctica? Thanks a million in advance.

Tealight

  • ASIF Citizen
  • Posts: 426
    • View Profile
    • CryosphereComputing
  • Liked: 127
  • Likes Given: 13
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #411 on: April 22, 2019, 12:08:53 PM »
Did anybody say their favorite glacier isn't featured? No? Well here is all of Greenland Bedrock anyway.

https://cryospherecomputing.tk/Bedrock
« Last Edit: April 22, 2019, 11:33:11 PM by Tealight »

Juan C. García

  • ASIF Upper Class
  • Posts: 1276
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 285
  • Likes Given: 443
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #412 on: April 24, 2019, 03:15:19 AM »
Forty-six years of Greenland Ice Sheet mass balance from 1972 to 2018

Jérémie Mouginot, Eric Rignot, Anders A. Bjørk, Michiel van den Broeke, Romain Millan, Mathieu Morlighem, Brice Noël, Bernd Scheuchl, and Michael Wood

Quote
Abstract
We reconstruct the mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet using a comprehensive survey of thickness, surface elevation, velocity, and surface mass balance (SMB) of 260 glaciers from 1972 to 2018. We calculate mass discharge, D, into the ocean directly for 107 glaciers (85% of D) and indirectly for 110 glaciers (15%) using velocity-scaled reference fluxes. The decadal mass balance switched from a mass gain of +47 ± 21 Gt/y in 1972–1980 to a loss of 51 ± 17 Gt/y in 1980–1990. The mass loss increased from 41 ± 17 Gt/y in 1990–2000, to 187 ± 17 Gt/y in 2000–2010, to 286 ± 20 Gt/y in 2010–2018, or sixfold since the 1980s, or 80 ± 6 Gt/y per decade, on average. The acceleration in mass loss switched from positive in 2000–2010 to negative in 2010–2018 due to a series of cold summers, which illustrates the difficulty of extrapolating short records into longer-term trends. Cumulated since 1972, the largest contributions to global sea level rise are from northwest (4.4 ± 0.2 mm), southeast (3.0 ± 0.3 mm), and central west (2.0 ± 0.2 mm) Greenland, with a total 13.7 ± 1.1 mm for the ice sheet. The mass loss is controlled at 66 ± 8% by glacier dynamics (9.1 mm) and 34 ± 8% by SMB (4.6 mm). Even in years of high SMB, enhanced glacier discharge has remained sufficiently high above equilibrium to maintain an annual mass loss every year since 1998.
https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/04/16/1904242116
PNAS first published April 22, 2019 https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1904242116

Which is the best answer to Sep-2012 ASI lost (compared to 1979-2000)?
50% [NSIDC Extent] or
73% [PIOMAS Volume]

Volume is harder to measure than extent, but 3-dimensional space is real, 2D's hide ~50% thickness gone.
-> IPCC/NSIDC trends [based on extent] underestimate the real speed of ASI lost.

Tealight

  • ASIF Citizen
  • Posts: 426
    • View Profile
    • CryosphereComputing
  • Liked: 127
  • Likes Given: 13
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #413 on: May 04, 2019, 06:28:40 PM »
I made some glacier size comparison charts featuring Greenland & Antarctic Glaciers. I hope it better visualizes how much ice is exposed to ocean water than a Bedrock map. The charts shows the dimensions of the glacier front. Where the x-axis is the glacier width and the y-axis is the glacier height.

https://cryospherecomputing.tk/Glacier-size

BenB

  • ASIF Citizen
  • Posts: 234
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 35
  • Likes Given: 9
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #414 on: May 14, 2019, 10:14:55 AM »
Poof!

12 May:


13 May:


Uummannaq Fjord system. Clearly the consistently warm weather in the west of Greenland is taking its toll on the fast ice.

gerontocrat

  • ASIF Royalty
  • Posts: 5437
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 721
  • Likes Given: 18
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #415 on: June 01, 2019, 09:54:34 PM »
I wandered around the DMI Polar Portal and found data on Watson River Annual Discharge
(SW Greenland - Melt from the ice-sheet).

So, as you do, I made a graph

2012 was a very big year
So was 2010
The R2 coefficient is so low as to make the trendline meaning less


EDIT- Graph corrected. Bloody scientists and their weird file formats hidden in text files.
AND ANOTHER EDIT see above
« Last Edit: June 01, 2019, 10:13:46 PM by gerontocrat »
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

gerontocrat

  • ASIF Royalty
  • Posts: 5437
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 721
  • Likes Given: 18
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #416 on: June 18, 2019, 01:19:50 PM »
The scientists have invented a new toy for themselves - the cryoegg. I hope it doesn't get squashed.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-48638958
'Cryoegg' to explore under Greenland Ice Sheet
Quote
UK scientists head to Greenland this week to trial new sensors that can be placed under its 2km-thick ice sheet.

The instruments are designed to give researchers unique information on the way glaciers slide towards the ocean.

Dubbed "Cryoeggs", the devices will report back on the behaviour of the meltwaters that run beneath the ice.

This water acts to lubricate the flow of glaciers, and in a warmer world could increase the volume of ice discharged to the ocean.

This would push up global sea levels - potentially by as much as 7m, if all the ice on Greenland were to melt.

Scientists want to understand how fast the process could unfold.

"Our models have done a fantastic job so far in building a picture of what might happen, but they've essentially been working blind because we have so little data from the bed of the Greenland ice sheet," said Dr Liz Bagshaw from Cardiff University.

"We have some measurements from cabled instruments and from the bottom of boreholes, but we don't have enough data to figure out what's going on across the whole of the ice sheet, to determine how much of that 7m might end up in the ocean," she told BBC News.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Tom_Mazanec

  • ASIF Middle Class
  • Posts: 579
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 23
  • Likes Given: 20
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #417 on: June 18, 2019, 10:28:54 PM »
« Last Edit: June 20, 2019, 06:31:27 PM by Tom_Mazanec »
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

b_lumenkraft

  • Guest
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #418 on: June 19, 2019, 11:19:49 PM »
How Boaty McBoatface is making climate change discoveries


miki

  • ASIF Citizen
  • Posts: 104
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 17
  • Likes Given: 141
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #419 on: June 21, 2019, 09:40:45 AM »
Image of the Day: Sled dogs running through Greenland sea ice melt

https://www.cnet.com/news/this-photo-from-greenland-says-everything-about-climate-change/

"Over the past week temperatures in northern Greenland have been comparable to the weather in Seattle, causing the top layer of sea ice near the village of Qaanaaq to turn into the Arctic equivalent of a kiddie pool. Danish climate researcher Steffen Olsen took the above photo of a dogsled team wading through the meltwater, which quickly went viral online as a vivid illustration of global warming in action."


Lennart van der Linde

  • ASIF Middle Class
  • Posts: 740
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 22
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #420 on: June 21, 2019, 11:46:54 AM »
Aschwanden et al 2019 on potential Greenland ice mass loss in the coming centuries:
https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/5/6/eaav9396?fbclid=IwAR2B6SbuwJ8009PDv7YFpEeoK4xv076tCnloSI_KHIJj6GfMlKcReZEYan4

They estimate about a 16% chance that the GIS will be completely gone in no more than five centuries under RCP8.5, and about a 50% chance that this would take no more than seven centuries (see their fig 1b below).

vox_mundi

  • ASIF Middle Class
  • Posts: 848
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 143
  • Likes Given: 76
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #421 on: June 26, 2019, 01:28:05 PM »
Researchers Discover More than 50 Lakes Beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet 
https://phys.org/news/2019-06-lakes-beneath-greenland-ice-sheet.html

Researchers have discovered 56 previously uncharted subglacial lakes beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet bringing the total known number of lakes to 60. 

Published in Nature Communications this week, their paper, "Distribution and dynamics of Greenland subglacial lakes", provides the first ice-sheet wide inventory of subglacial lakes beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet.

By analysing more than 500,000 km of airborne radio echo sounding data, which provide images of the bed of the Greenland Ice Sheet, researchers from the Universities of Lancaster, Sheffield and Stanford identified 54 subglacial lakes, as well as a further two using ice-surface elevation changes.

... The newly discovered lakes range from 0.2-5.9 km in length and the majority were found beneath relatively slow moving ice away from the largely frozen bed of the ice sheet interior and seemed to be relatively stable.

Closer to the margin where water already regularly gets to the bed, the researchers saw some evidence for lake activity, with two new subglacial lakes observed to drain and then refill.


Dr. Stephen J. Livingstone, Senior Lecturer in Physical Geography, University of Sheffield, said:

"The lakes we have identified tend to cluster in eastern Greenland where the bed is rough and can therefore readily trap and store meltwater and in northern Greenland, where we suggest the lakes indicate a patchwork of frozen and thawed bed conditions.



Open Access: J.S.Bowling, et.al., Distribution and dynamics of Greenland subglacial lakes, Nature Communications (2019)
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

SteveMDFP

  • ASIF Upper Class
  • Posts: 1280
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 112
  • Likes Given: 11
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #422 on: July 02, 2019, 07:41:16 PM »
An interesting article about Greenland.  Much of the world is running short on common, everyday sand.  Greenland has a new abundance of it. 

Melting Greenland Is Awash in Sand
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/07/01/climate/greenland-glacier-melting-sand.html

"Could this island, population 57,000, become a provider of sand to billions of people?
Sand for eroded beaches, potentially from the Rockaways to the Riviera. Sand to be used as bedding for pipes, cables and other underground infrastructure. Mostly, though, sand for concrete, to build the houses, highways and harbors of a growing world."


oren

  • ASIF Governor
  • Posts: 3914
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 535
  • Likes Given: 1109
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #423 on: July 03, 2019, 02:36:12 AM »
Great. Now Greenland will contribute slightly more to SLR by putting its sand in the sea to support eroded beaches made worse by SLR.

HapHazard

  • ASIF Lurker
  • Posts: 86
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 18
  • Likes Given: 444
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #424 on: July 03, 2019, 12:08:43 PM »
Great. Now Greenland will contribute slightly more to SLR by putting its sand in the sea to support eroded beaches made worse by SLR.

(╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

DrTskoul

  • ASIF Middle Class
  • Posts: 940
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 33
  • Likes Given: 14
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #425 on: July 03, 2019, 01:00:03 PM »
Great. Now Greenland will contribute slightly more to SLR by putting its sand in the sea to support eroded beaches made worse by SLR.

Dont worry it will be mined away... /sarc
“You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing -- that's what counts.”
― Richard P. Feynman

sqwazw

  • ASIF Lurker
  • Posts: 9
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2
  • Likes Given: 27
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #426 on: July 03, 2019, 01:03:48 PM »
Mostly, though, sand for concrete, to build the houses, highways and harbors dikes of a growing shrinking world."
Fixed that for you.

ms

  • ASIF Lurker
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #427 on: July 08, 2019, 08:05:19 PM »
The rock dust from Greenlands glaiciers might even have a better use
http://sciencenordic.com/can-greenlandic-mud-help-feed-world
- research is on-going.

GeoffBeacon

  • ASIF Citizen
  • Posts: 377
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #428 on: July 08, 2019, 08:39:50 PM »
Is this sand from Greenland the right sort of sand?

Is the world running out of sand?
Quote
Builders like angular sand of the kind found on riverbeds. Sand, sand everywhere, nor any grain to use, to paraphrase Coleridge. A textbook example is the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, the world’s tallest skyscraper. Despite being surrounded by sand, it was constructed with concrete incorporating the “right kind of sand” from Australia.


High buildings have high embodied carbon.
Let's build low wooden ones.
Il faut cultiver notre cité-jardin
The Sustainable Plotlands Association

SteveMDFP

  • ASIF Upper Class
  • Posts: 1280
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 112
  • Likes Given: 11
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #429 on: July 09, 2019, 02:17:40 AM »

High buildings have high embodied carbon.
Let's build low wooden ones.

Buildings up to about 20 floors in height (or more) can be built from wood:

List of tallest wooden buildings
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tallest_wooden_buildings

magnamentis

  • Guest
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #430 on: July 09, 2019, 04:06:15 AM »
so some guy here in a forum that deals with global warming and sea-ice loss is seriously spending time and energy to discuss how to use greenland sand in the tropics, means even more stuff to transport all around the globe without as real need ?

that evades me, if  someone can enlighten me i'm listening but i have troubel to  imagine one possible way that this would be as sustainable approach and that the benefits would in any way compensate for the downsides.

???
« Last Edit: July 09, 2019, 08:09:53 PM by magnamentis »

Rod

  • ASIF Citizen
  • Posts: 241
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 89
  • Likes Given: 6
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #431 on: July 09, 2019, 04:18:18 AM »
so some guy here in a forum that deals with global warming and sea-ice loss is seriously spending time and energy to discuss who to use greenland sand in the tropics, means even more stuff to transport all around the globe without as real need ?


Sarcasm gets absolutely lost in this forum.  Every time someone makes a joke or a light handed comment  it turns into a challenge.  It was a comment on a recent paper Mag.  Nothing more.  🤔

magnamentis

  • Guest
Re: What's new in Greenland?
« Reply #432 on: July 09, 2019, 08:13:33 PM »
so some guy here in a forum that deals with global warming and sea-ice loss is seriously spending time and energy to discuss who to use greenland sand in the tropics, means even more stuff to transport all around the globe without as real need ?


Sarcasm gets absolutely lost in this forum.  Every time someone makes a joke or a light handed comment  it turns into a challenge.  It was a comment on a recent paper Mag.  Nothing more.  🤔

there is an easy solution to that like: [SARC] [JK] [Just Kidding] [FUN] [JOKE] [:-) ;) ;)]

and then there was not just one guy being sarcastic, there was an entire group discussing the topic AT LENGTH and jokes that are discussed or explained are never funny.

i hope that comes across as helpful, i really want you to feel comfortable and it was not my intention to do anything different. the naked truth is not nice to look at i know but unfortunately the lie/illusion has stolen the cloths of the truth and since then is wandering the globe disguised as the truth  8) 8) 8) 8)    ;) ;) ;) ;)      :) :) :) :)

all good and sincere apologies  for any inconvenience.

EDIT: there are many things we can learn, i.e. languages, but what we call:

SPRACHWITZ, or WORTSPIELE and certain forms of sarcasm are only understood by those who either studied it, live there for long or are native speakers of a language. hence it's not only possible but even probable that many of fine tuned stuff evades me, i once decided that it's better to speak many languages quite well instead of 3 or 4 perfect. personal choice though.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2019, 08:29:40 PM by magnamentis »