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Shared Humanity

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #600 on: August 01, 2019, 02:19:07 AM »
Most of the route will be along an existing highway.

Will. I have been in Pune recently. They need infrastructure money for buses, trains and roads ( they are awfully crowded ) and not spend money on things like hyperloop. Really??? Most people have barely enough money to travel with autorickshaw or a scooter for a family of four. Ridiculous display of excessive wealth divide.

This thread on hyperloops is a great example of an answer to the wrong question.

TerryM

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #601 on: August 01, 2019, 08:55:51 AM »
Most of the route will be along an existing highway.

Will. I have been in Pune recently. They need infrastructure money for buses, trains and roads ( they are awfully crowded ) and not spend money on things like hyperloop. Really??? Most people have barely enough money to travel with autorickshaw or a scooter for a family of four. Ridiculous display of excessive wealth divide.


I believe this project, which was to begin this year is discussed above beginning at #553 - just after an announcement that Ukraine was expecting a Hyperloop in it's near future.


Other than the likelihood that politicians in both regions might be very susceptible to monied interests from afar, I can't see much that is similar between the two regions other than their shared poverty.


Another possibility occurred to me as I was writing this. I might not appreciate the sights and smells of being in close proximity to either India's poor or Ukraine's Nazis. If I were a well off local in either location I might become quite enamored of a system that the community would pay for which would allow me to travel about with minimal fear of Nazi gangs or loathing of India's impoverished hoards.


As alluded to by our good DrT, this form of transportation very effectively divides the haves from their less successful brethren, perhaps this is reason enough to declare the Hyperloop a municipal asset?
Terry


P.S.
I assume there are still no plans for this to be an actual evacuated tube maglev. The route is too short and the corners are far too tight.


What we're discussing here is a small, above ground, limited access, low density subway that will toddle about at far less than sonic speeds, at a fare that only the elite can meet  - but to be paid for, at least in part by municipal funds.


What a wonderful leap into the future!

Sigmetnow

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #602 on: August 01, 2019, 05:10:16 PM »
Most of the route will be along an existing highway.

Will. I have been in Pune recently. They need infrastructure money for buses, trains and roads ( they are awfully crowded ) and not spend money on things like hyperloop. Really??? Most people have barely enough money to travel with autorickshaw or a scooter for a family of four. Ridiculous display of excessive wealth divide.

• the price of a ride is still unknown
• taking hundreds or thousands of vehicles off the road makes road travel easier for others, and lessens future damage to it
• shortening the travel time between the two regions makes it possible to live outside of the already crowded city, yet still work there.
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

TerryM

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #603 on: August 02, 2019, 10:07:21 AM »
The Hype in Vegas seems to be wearing a little thin.


6 modified Model Xs will be required carrying 16 people each. (Plus driver?)
As there are no provisions for turning about they'll run both forwards and backwards.
When in operation in 2021 each modified X will have a driver?
Hyperloop will be held responsible if vibrations while building or operating interfere with the existing monorail (purchased from Disney World  :-\ [size=78%])[/size]
Making their 4.4k passengers/hr commitment won't allow much time for boarding/exiting.


Gripes about the project, but has links to the plans.
https://jalopnik.com/elon-musks-las-vegas-tunnel-kind-of-sucks-1836890921


More on the monorail's position, and questions about the 1 minute station to station timing.
https://techcrunch.com/2019/08/01/its-fight-night-in-las-vegas-elon-musks-loop-vs-the-monorail/


Neither of the above make it clear whether the driver is included as one of the 16 occupants & both question why in 2021 a driver would be necessary on such a "closed" system.


One of my questions has always been the likelihood of caliche. Caliche is an extremely hard concretion that underlies much of Las Vegas and the reason that swimming pools are shallow and basements non existent. Generally D8 dozers with pole driving claws, as well as explosives, are required to break it up.
If they hit caliche it's going to slow things down considerably, especially as monorail vibrations have become a matter of contention.
They'll be starting this September.


This project needs to be up and running by Jan.1 2021 when CES opens, no "Musk Time" allowed.


Terry

interstitial

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #604 on: August 02, 2019, 11:31:36 PM »
My laymen understanding of tunneling is that hard rock is great. If it is especially hard it might cause it to slow down and wear through more bits but it isn't a problem. If it is dirt, clay or aggregate that is what stops tunneling machines.

TerryM

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #605 on: August 03, 2019, 01:00:02 AM »
My laymen understanding of tunneling is that hard rock is great. If it is especially hard it might cause it to slow down and wear through more bits but it isn't a problem. If it is dirt, clay or aggregate that is what stops tunneling machines.


Caliche is a bitch. It's not a rock as such but rather a very difficult concretion to get through. If you're ever in Las Vegas and hear what sounds like artillery from some ways off, that will be the sounds of caliche being dynamited where a roadway, a sewer or a swimming pool is under construction.


In 2015 they used a $25mm state of the art digging machine to put in the "third straw" sucking water from Lake Mead to the city's water plant . It took 6 years $817mm and one man's life to complete the 3 mile tunnel through rock and caliche.
Terry

Sigmetnow

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #606 on: August 03, 2019, 01:36:09 AM »
**sigh**

• The site plans were revised in July — after the meeting quoted in the article above.

https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/6225033-19-0429-2019-7-8-Revised-Plan-and-Photo-VERY-GOOD.html

• There are two tunnels, one for each direction.  Easy enough to make a platform at the end of a tunnel, which rotates the car and moves it to the other tunnel — if needed.

Of course there will be safety officers in the cars, especially in the beginning.  People are stupid, reckless, and have no compunction about damaging property.

• TBC/Tesla has already run Model Xs autonomously through the Hawthorne test tunnel at speed.
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

petm

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #607 on: August 03, 2019, 02:03:50 AM »
The US doesn't even have regular high speed rail. What makes anyone think a sci-fi version would be viable?

DrTskoul

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #608 on: August 03, 2019, 02:05:03 AM »
The US doesn't even have regular high speed rail. What makes anyone think a sci-fi version would be viable?

Because Elon is building it .... /sarc

petm

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #609 on: August 03, 2019, 02:08:53 AM »
 :o :D

TerryM

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #610 on: August 03, 2019, 03:54:37 AM »
Sig
The revisions seem to consist of 3 pages. A diagram, a photo shopped picture, and a 2 bullet point typed page.


TBC is contracted to provide transportation to 4400 per hour for the opening of CES in January 2021. 3 stations will need to be excavated, the existing monorail must not be "vibrated", 3 tunnels need to be completed, permits need to be pulled and inspections need to be signed off.


Las Vegas - or rather Winchester Township, can be as fussy as hell if they get it into their heads that the suckers visitors might be inconvenienced. The inspectors can be are slow, cranky, and they insist on doing things their way - even when their way is in no way the right way.


We'll know a little more in September, and it will all be over when CES opens their doors.


Any odds on whether the Monorail tries throttle their prospective competition while it's still in the crib?
Terry

TerryM

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #611 on: August 04, 2019, 02:04:38 AM »
I believe Elon had been quoted to say that the Las Vegas Tunnels would be completed this year.
In May he stated that construction would be starting in July -(last month).
This month they're slated to begin in September.


Elon time will run into a brick wall when CES opens Jan. 2021.
Terry

Gumbercules

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #612 on: August 04, 2019, 07:20:18 PM »
Terry,

Before SpaceX, there has never been a rocket that reached orbit (orbital velocity) and survived re-entry to land.  Let alone was launched to orbit and re-landed a second time.  Or a third time!


Did Musk actually do that? I watched one of the launches earlier this year. Two first stages landed simultaneously. The first stages re-landed. But I don't think any final stage (the stage that reaches orbit) was re-landed. The reason is you can't re-land from orbit (17,500 mph minimum) without a heat shield.

So I believe your statement is wrong. And not just wrong, but hugely wrong. Slowing down from a couple thousand miles per hour is nothing like slowing down from 17,500 mph. Literally nothing. That's why single stage to orbit is such a big deal. It's why the Space Shuttle was such a waste of money and why it killed one of the two killed crews.

No launch vehicle has ever propelled itself to orbit then landed under power. The space shuttle just glided, after riding inside a fireball, and was just barely reusable. The amount of refurbishment after each landing was enormous.

« Last Edit: August 04, 2019, 07:29:38 PM by Gumbercules »

Gumbercules

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #613 on: August 04, 2019, 07:23:03 PM »
Ah, Thunderf00t. The Youtuber who knows a little about chemistry is considered a scientist now.

What's gonna be shared next? Harris or Peterson?

Yeah, what a slippery slope this Youtube thingy is...

At least I provide context when I post a video.

Thunderf00t IS a scientist. Are you?

Thunderf00t is the name of the youtube channel of a real human scientist named Phil Mason.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phil_Mason

"Mason received a BSc (2:1) (1993) and PhD (1997) in chemistry from the University of Birmingham.[3] From 2003[4] until at least August 2010, Mason was affiliated with the University of Bristol.[5]"

"Mason worked at Cornell University's department of food science from 2002 until 2012, where he studied the molecular interactions between water and sugar molecules,[6] as well as molecular modeling with regard to proteins and guanidinium solutions. As of 2013, he was working at the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic as a member of a research group headed by Pavel Jungwirth.[3] Mason has argued that alkali metal reactions with water can cause a Coulomb explosion.[7][8]"

Lol, attacking Harris and Peterson. Why am I not even slightly surprised. I bet you won't attack them on substance, just on ad hominem.

« Last Edit: August 04, 2019, 09:35:20 PM by Gumbercules »

Neven

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #614 on: August 04, 2019, 10:39:11 PM »
There are plenty of ways to 'attack' Peterson and Harris on substance, and the Internet is full of them, but let's stay on-topic and move any SpaceX discussion to the appropriate thread.
Il faut comparer, comparer, comparer, et cultiver notre jardin

TerryM

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #615 on: August 05, 2019, 02:21:32 AM »
Why we need the Hyperloop!


... public transit is both inconvenient and dangerous. “It’s a pain in the ass,” he said. “That’s why everyone doesn’t like it. And there’s like a bunch of random strangers, one of who might be a serial killer,"...
E.M.

When the sheltered son of an South African Emerald Mine owner fears "random strangers" because one might be a "serial killer" - it doesn't require too much of a stretch to read between the lines.[/font]

From a very expensive grade school (love the Olympic Pool), through extremely prestigious high schools (with a second pool for water polo), in Apartheid South Africa our young Elon Lord of Mars wouldn't have been expected to share a bus with "them". It might even have been a capital offense for one of "them" to attempt to gain access to any means of transportation occupied by the white occupiers!

A private airplane, gorgeous yacht or secure limousine where "they" didn't get any closer than polishing the rims or buffing the brightwork were the means of travel our Green Messiah was familiar with. And of course the dreaded (by "them) STF kept a sharp eye out for "serial killers" & "random strangers"


https://archinect.com/news/article/150042726/dear-elon-musk-keep-your-hands-off-our-public-infrastructure

Terry

Rob Dekker

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #616 on: August 05, 2019, 10:10:39 AM »
Why we need the Hyperloop!


... public transit is both inconvenient and dangerous. “It’s a pain in the ass,” he said. “That’s why everyone doesn’t like it. And there’s like a bunch of random strangers, one of who might be a serial killer,"...
E.M.

When the sheltered son of an South African Emerald Mine owner fears "random strangers" because one might be a "serial killer" - it doesn't require too much of a stretch to read between the lines.[/font]

Jeez,Terry. Seems you have an axe to grind.

Is there something specific you would like to tell Elon ?
This is our planet. This is our time.
Let's not waste either.

kassy

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #617 on: August 05, 2019, 03:19:09 PM »
Did you think Elons quote on public transport made sense, Rob?
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

TerryM

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #618 on: August 05, 2019, 03:41:57 PM »

<snipped>

Is there something specific you would like to tell Elon ?




I don't even have anything I'd like to tell you !
Terry

oren

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #619 on: August 05, 2019, 04:56:15 PM »
Did you think Elons quote on public transport made sense, Rob?
Even Musk dis not think it made sense, and has already made a 180 turn on the issue.

Shared Humanity

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #620 on: August 05, 2019, 07:03:18 PM »
Why we need the Hyperloop!


... public transit is both inconvenient and dangerous. “It’s a pain in the ass,” he said. “That’s why everyone doesn’t like it. And there’s like a bunch of random strangers, one of who might be a serial killer,"...



Hmmm...the CTA (Chicago Transit Authority) provides on average 1.7 million rides a day during the week, less on weekends. This is only within the city boundaries and does not include the RTA which runs in the suburbs or Metra trains which mainly take suburbanites to their jobs downtown.

Elon really needs to get out more.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2019, 07:33:21 PM by Shared Humanity »

Gumbercules

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #621 on: August 05, 2019, 11:24:31 PM »
Did you think Elons quote on public transport made sense, Rob?
Even Musk dis not think it made sense, and has already made a 180 turn on the issue.

He was probably sleep-deprived, drunk, or high, when he said this. Anyway, he's not a people person.

TerryM

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #622 on: August 06, 2019, 03:06:28 AM »
Should those of us that are not terrified by the possibility of rubbing shoulders with "them" be demanding that our legislators invest in electrified buses, trams and trains - with funds now earmarked for Hyperloops, EVs (and charging facilities for private vehicles)?


The Indian Hyperloop is estimated to cost in excess of $10B - imagine what $10B could do if spent on free buses, subsidized passenger rail and improved freight handling facilities.


Even in Las Vegas a series of increasingly rapid sidewalks would allow CES participants to interact with other attendees, view the exhibits, (the reason they're attending in person), and enjoy the ambiance, as opposed to being cloistered in a subterranean pod with 15 others of their party.


Hyperloop is the solution for a problem that thankfully very few suffer from. Most of us appreciate the opportunity to meet with and interact with others - some of us even suffer from claustrophobia when confined in small places underground.
Why should the many finance the peculiar phobias of a tiny minority who could most generously be thought of as "agoraphobic".



Use public moneys to subsidize public transportation!
Even has a nice ring to it.
Terry

Sigmetnow

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #623 on: August 06, 2019, 08:08:02 PM »
A hyperloop IS public transportation. It is more efficient, in that all “pods” go directly to your destination; no stopping at stations you don’t want.  It would move more people using less energy than most forms of transportation, because it spends most of its time coasting.  It would improve quality of life, by allowing people to live some distance from the crowded city where they work (which now requires 3+ hours travel time by road); not adding to noise or air pollution; and not killing people at road crossings.  The cost may be less than new rail. 

The Las Vegas Loop (which is not a hyperloop) will transport people rapidly between convention spaces.  Traveling quickly .8 mile to the other side of the convention center in time for your next program is a requirement here.  Browsing slowly on a moving sidewalk is not a solution.
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

TerryM

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #624 on: August 06, 2019, 10:11:38 PM »
A hyperloop IS public transportation. It is more efficient, in that all “pods” go directly to your destination; no stopping at stations you don’t want.  It would move more people using less energy than most forms of transportation, because it spends most of its time coasting.  It would improve quality of life, by allowing people to live some distance from the crowded city where they work (which now requires 3+ hours travel time by road); not adding to noise or air pollution; and not killing people at road crossings.  The cost may be less than new rail. 

The Las Vegas Loop (which is not a hyperloop) will transport people rapidly between convention spaces.  Traveling quickly .8 mile to the other side of the convention center in time for your next program is a requirement here.  Browsing slowly on a moving sidewalk is not a solution.
At one time Elon was calling for it to be evacuated - which made no sense from my prospective - a vacuum for .8 miles?


When Musk switched to rubber tired modified cars - complete with driver -  it became little more than a Disney attraction for adults. Will anyone ride it twice?


Las Vegas has had a few of them over the years, Two very short monorails - one of which was never completed - but the pylons are (were) still standing in North Las Vegas when I left. Caesar's Palace had/has? a moving sidewalk that would whisk the suckers tourists in, but they were on their own should they ever wish to leave, then there was a monorail with one car that shuttled back and forth at less than a walking pace. ( no driver on that beast - it looked very futuristic in still photographs. :-\
The rest were killed in the womb by the taxi authority, always firmly in the pocket of the cab companies.


You're right. There isn't much left of Hyperloop left in what they're building. The Hype is still there, but the plans no longer show a Loop. Neither is it Mass Transportation, 4400 people can stroll .8th of a mile in far less than an hour. ;D


Terry

Gumbercules

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #625 on: August 06, 2019, 11:33:58 PM »
A hyperloop IS public transportation. It is more efficient, in that all “pods” go directly to your destination; no stopping at stations you don’t want.  It would move more people using less energy than most forms of transportation, because it spends most of its time coasting.  It would improve quality of life, by allowing people to live some distance from the crowded city where they work (which now requires 3+ hours travel time by road); not adding to noise or air pollution; and not killing people at road crossings.  The cost may be less than new rail. 

The Las Vegas Loop (which is not a hyperloop) will transport people rapidly between convention spaces.  Traveling quickly .8 mile to the other side of the convention center in time for your next program is a requirement here.  Browsing slowly on a moving sidewalk is not a solution.


Can you do the calculation to determine how much energy it takes to generate the near vacuum at near sea level? How many times will the entire line have to be re-depressurized?

Sigmetnow

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #626 on: August 08, 2019, 12:18:38 AM »
At one time Elon was calling for it to be evacuated...

This is incorrect.  The Las Vegas project was always envisioned to be a Loop, not a hyperloop.  Every Boring Company project announced so far has been a Loop — that is the reason they can contract for the project to be completed in such a short time. 
(TBC has not built a hyperloop test track, let alone contracted to build a full-scale one.  You may be thinking of the small-scale, above-ground hyperloop track at SpaceX, used to test student-built pods.)


From March (when we first learned about the project):

Elon Musk's Boring Company Lands Las Vegas Contract
https://interestingengineering.com/elon-musks-boring-company-lands-las-vegas-contract

Las Vegas bets on Elon Musk’s Boring Company for tunnel project
https://www.theverge.com/2019/3/6/18252302/boring-company-las-vegas-dig-plans-2021

Quote
A system like this might be necessary. The LVCC is already a sprawling facility (just ask Engadget's staff), but it'll be two miles across by the time the expansion is done -- that's a long walk if you're just trying to visit a booth at a trade show. It could also alleviate some of the pressure on existing transportation options like the monorail, shuttle vans, taxis and ridesharing services.
Las Vegas taps Elon Musk's Boring Company for transport project
https://www.engadget.com/2019/03/06/las-vegas-boring-company-tunnels/

Quote
Why tunnels?
The benefits of subsurface transportation systems include:
   •   No surface noise and vibration. Tunnel construction and operation will be silent, invisible, and imperceptible at the surface.
   •   No communities divided with lanes and barriers. TBC will not use public surface right-of- way for construction or operation of its system.
   •   Comfortable and convenient for passengers. Higher speeds and straighter alignments are possible due to fewer subsurface right-of-way constraints.
   •   Weatherproof. Operation is unaffected by weather.
https://www.boringcompany.com/lvcc
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

oren

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #627 on: August 08, 2019, 08:38:33 AM »
We keep mixing the threads here. The Hyperloop is an unproven concept of vacuum tubes and very fast pods, which until implemented in real life somewhere in the world should not be taken seriously IMHO. Although it was first proposed by Elon Musk, it has no relation to the Boring Company, as far as I am aware, beyond some high words. Musk talks glibly of Loop and Hyperloop, but there is very little in common between them beyond the similar-sounding name.
There is a Boring Company general thread, where things like the LVCC "Loop" project should be discussed.

Sigmetnow

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #628 on: August 08, 2019, 03:49:54 PM »
We keep mixing the threads here....

I would not have worded the explanation quite the same way, but... yes. :D
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

TerryM

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #629 on: August 09, 2019, 12:25:46 AM »
We keep mixing the threads here. The Hyperloop is an unproven concept of vacuum tubes and very fast pods, which until implemented in real life somewhere in the world should not be taken seriously IMHO. Although it was first proposed by Elon Musk, it has no relation to the Boring Company, as far as I am aware, beyond some high words. Musk talks glibly of Loop and Hyperloop, but there is very little in common between them beyond the similar-sounding name.
There is a Boring Company general thread, where things like the LVCC "Loop" project should be discussed.
^^Ramen^^


I assume that sometime after construction begins the Las Vegas Convention Authority project will deserve a thread of it's own.


The three stations, which will probably certainly be where the largest volume of dirt is removed will probably certainly be dug by conventional means by digging down from the surface.
The 3 adjoining tunnels may or may not be built with Musk's Boreing Machine - I believe this will be dependent on the composition of the soil they encounter.


If it's "backfill" a quick push through with the Boreing Machine's a no brainer.
If it's not too deep and consists of virgin caliche, cut and cover with dynamite & large "dozers" makes sense.
If it's expansive clay, the Boreing Machine works, but heaves and subsistence will cause major problems and delays.


All of the above are possible in the Las Vegas Valley, and a mix of the above is possible, perhaps likely.
We've had Casinos that were sinking erratically at > 1 foot/year - a subdivision where they could never keep the street lights standing vertically, houses from splitting apart or the sidewalks aligned with the driveways.


For decades portions of Stewart Avenue were roped off with snow fencing as the road's surface would heave with 4 foot hills that came and went as the sun crossed the sky.


Mega projects have been abandoned when calichi was discovered, and concrete block walls require 1 foot below ground for every foot above ground. That 12' high fence you see in Las Vegas is 18 feet high. The 6 foot underground section is to keep the visible parts from crumbling or tumbling.


Las Vegas's surface geology appears benign - but it's not.
Think of the drunken forests with melting permafrost beneath recreated for your enjoyment in the desert.


Terry

SteveMDFP

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #630 on: November 10, 2019, 05:07:02 PM »
My own (inexpert) opinion is that the hyperloop concept is likely unworkable from a combined engineering/safety/economics standpoint.  However, it's still interesting.  Different regions around the world are going ahead with at least planning stages.


Northeast Ohio planners proposing a second hyperloop project to link Pittsburgh to Chicago via Cleveland
https://www.post-gazette.com/news/transportation/2019/11/10/Hyperloop-Pittsburgh-Cleveland-Chicago-Hyperloop-Transportation-Technologies-second-proposed-system/stories/201911090014

Farther down on the same web page is a related article:
Ohio planners looking at a 30-year timeline for hyperloop project between Pittsburgh and Chicago


TerryM

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #631 on: November 10, 2019, 06:11:09 PM »
But Elon has had verbal approval for the Ny-Phil-Balt-DC Hyperloop since 2017. New York to DC in less than 1/2 hour.



“Just received verbal [government] approval for the Boring Company to build an underground NY-Phil-Balt-DC Hyperloop,” [/size]Musk wrote in a July 20 tweet.[/color][/size] “NY-DC in 29 mins.”[/color]

https://www.businessinsider.com.au/elon-musk-hyperloop-plan-boring-company-2017-8
Terry

Sigmetnow

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #632 on: November 10, 2019, 07:06:47 PM »
Quote
Virgin Hyperloop One (@HyperloopOne) 10/24/19, 10:38 AM
Today we announced the results of our strategic study with @kaec_saudi, which found that building the world’s first extended test and certification hyperloop track in Saudi Arabia could increase Saudi GDP by $4 billion by 2030. Read more:

Hyperloop project to raise Saudi Arabia's GDP by $4bln, add 124,000 jobs
https://www.zawya.com/mena/en/story/Hyperloop_project_to_raise_Saudi_Arabias_GDP_by_4bln_add_124000_jobs-ZAWYA20191024104516/

#Vision2030
https://twitter.com/hyperloopone/status/1187377830616879106

Quote
Virgin Hyperloop One (@HyperloopOne) 11/1/19, 2:20 AM
Hyperloop has become part of popular culture in India! We're not @SrBachchan but we'll ask the question - "which Indian state will get the world's first ultra-fast hyperloop transportation system?"
Watch here: https://www.mxplayer.in/show/watch-kaun-banega-crorepati-2019-season-11-series-online-2540edccf64d8b8489b9330c475489d6
#KBC #KBC11 #India
https://twitter.com/hyperloopone/status/1190151696883675136

U.S.
Missouri Dreams of Traveling 700 Miles an Hour
The State, which missed out on Transcontinental Railroad, moves to win chance to build nation’s first Hyperloop test track
Shayndi RaiceNovember 7, 2019
Quote
Missouri had its hand up long before the document came out. Virgin Hyperloop One’s Chief Executive Jay Walder said that when he met Missouri’s Republican Gov. Mike Parson in April, the first thing the governor said was, “How can we bring Hyperloop to Missouri?”

While other states such as Texas, North Carolina and Ohio have also been studying the opportunity, Missouri has been ahead in publicly staking out its position on Hyperloop, according to Ryan Kelly, a Virgin Hyperloop One spokesman. Missouri released the first feasibility study in the U.S. of Hyperloop in October last year. The Missouri speaker of the house set up a blue-ribbon panel to study Hyperloop that released a report last week outlining how the state could win the certification track and ultimately become the center of a national Hyperloop system.

Behind Missouri’s push is a fear that its major cities could be left behind economically as it faces sluggish population growth and a contracting labor force.

“States like Missouri have sort of been seen as being left behind,” said Elijah Haahr, the state’s Republican speaker of the house. “This is our chance to catch up on that front.”
...
The state hopes to fund the effort through a public-private partnership, including an investment from Virgin Hyperloop, to avoid raising taxes but hasn’t nailed down financing yet. Bids are due in February. ...
https://www.wsj.com/articles/missouri-dreams-of-traveling-700-miles-an-hour-11573122601?redirect=amp#click=https://t.co/325Cp4Q5By
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oren

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #633 on: November 11, 2019, 01:24:02 AM »
I really hope all these governments will wait to see an actual working hyperloop somewhere in the world before spending a lot of money on their planning.

Sigmetnow

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #634 on: November 11, 2019, 02:15:15 AM »
I really hope all these governments will wait to see an actual working hyperloop somewhere in the world before spending a lot of money on their planning.

Somebody has to be first. ;)  But the fact that so many different entities have studied the technology and believe it to be achievable, desirable and worthy of investment lends credence to the idea.  Like any other new tech, subsequent iterations will capitalize on what has been done before.  And of note is that most customers are planning to build test tracks or segments, before attempting to roll out a final project.
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GoSouthYoungins

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #635 on: November 14, 2019, 01:21:54 AM »
Its a fElon Musk idea. Total fiction. No working product. Semi, battery swap, super service, hovercraft, cyborg, alien dreadnaught, solar tile, pickup carrying a pickup, 7 seater model 3, 10x reuseable rocket.

I'm sure the list is waaaaaayyyy longer. But thats just off the top of my head.

Musk makes up nice sounding stuff. And he screams it from roofttops. He makes some money off the baffoons who buy into the impossible idea, but nothing comes of it.

Dr.Seuss at least made his clever nonsense rhyme.


HYPERLOOOP!!!!!!!
big time oops

Sigmetnow

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #636 on: November 14, 2019, 01:50:14 AM »
U.S. Senator Joe Manchin, as a member of the committee that will oversee the Dept. of Transportation’s Non-Traditional and Emerging Transportation Technology Council, recommends his home state of West Virginia (of course ;)) for Hyperloop One to build a test center for establishing regulatory standards for the new technology.

”You have set forth an aggressive schedule for construction of the test site and certification, and I strongly believe that West Virginia can move Virgin Hyperloop One through complete testing to full operational capability more efficiently than anywhere else.”

Manchin Sends Letter To Richard Branson Advocating For Virgin One To Build Certification And Test Center In West Virginia
November 13, 2019
Quote
Washington, D.C. – U.S. Joe Manchin (D-WV) sent a letter advocating for Virgin Hyperloop One to build their proposed certification and test center in West Virginia to Sir Richard Branson, Chairman of Virgin Group, the parent organization of Virgin Hyperloop One. Senator Manchin previously met with the leadership team of Virgin Hyperloop One on October 16th to discuss the possibility of building the center in West Virginia. Following that meeting, Virgin Hyperloop One released a request for proposals earlier this month to states, regional or local governments, and other organizations – including West Virginia – to create a certification and test center to establish regulatory standards for the new technology. Senator Manchin is a member of the Transportation Appropriations Subcommittee, which will oversee the Department of Transportation’s newly-formed Non-Traditional and Emerging Transportation Technology (NETT) Council and is intended to support innovative transportation projects like hyperloop.
https://www.manchin.senate.gov/newsroom/press-releases/manchin-sends-letter-to-richard-branson-advocating-for-virgin-one-to-build-certification-and-test-center-in-west-virginia
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Sigmetnow

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Re: The Hyperloop
« Reply #637 on: November 27, 2019, 01:51:29 PM »
The experienced Independent Safety Assessors at Certifer have validated the readiness of Virgin Hyperloop One’s technology to move the first-of-its-kind certification process forward.

Certifer Confirms Virgin Hyperloop One Technology is Ready for Independent Third-Party Safety Assessment
Quote
Valenciennes, France, Nov 26, 2019 - Today, Certifer announced they are working with Virgin Hyperloop One (VHO) to meet their goal of surpassing the safety of all existing transport systems. Certifer has followed VHO’s progress with the R&D, prototyping and testing stages, and has performed a complete review of their solution design status. The experienced Independent Safety Assessors at Certifer validated the readiness of Virgin Hyperloop One’s technology and organization to be assessed in terms of safety and confirmed the company is ready to take this historic first step – the first of its kind in the hyperloop space.

In building the world’s first hyperloop system, VHO, is creating a disruption in the traditional approach to transportation. Just like all railway and urban transportation projects, such as high-speed trains, light rail transportation systems, and metro rolling stocks, the VHO technology is subject to the same process and constraints as those reviewed on “traditional” mode of transportation.

VHO has chosen to rely on Certifer, an independent safety assessment (ISA) body, to perform a third party evaluation of the company's engineering and safety process. Additionally, Certifer will serve as an independent assessor to ensure VHO is in compliance with relevant transportation guidelines. Certifer will support VHO with its high-level expertise across all of the railway disciplines and subdisciplines as well as from several different domains such as system safety, hardware development, software development, civil and mechanical works, guideways, control command and signaling, magnetic propulsion, etc. Certifer will work closely with VHO’s dedicated Safety Certification and Quality Assurance team.

Certifer is assessing whether the Engineering Safety Management Plan developed by VHO is adequate to achieve the stated goals, and that the identified list of standards and regulations referred to by VHO for this program is sound from safety viewpoint. In this framework, Certifer is considering the whole transport system, including pods (vehicles), civil and guideway structures, vacuum and guideway mechanisms, docks, controls and communication, maintenance and systems.

Virgin Hyperloop One Regulatory Progress
Governments around the world are recognizing hyperloop as a new mode of transportation. Earlier this year, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao created the Non-Traditional and Emerging Transportation Technology (NETT) Council to explore the regulation and permitting of hyperloop technology to bring this new form of mass transportation to the United States. The European Commission’s Directorate-General for Mobility and Transport (DGMOVE) has also been leading discussions with hyperloop companies to advance regulatory standards. In India, the Principal Scientific Advisor (PSA), Prof. Vijayraghavan, has set up an independent committee called the Consultative Group on Future of Transportation (CGFT) to explore the regulatory path for hyperloop.

About Certifer
Headquartered in Valenciennes, Certifer is a leading global player specialized in Railway and urban transportation. Founded in 1997 in France, Certifer has developed its expertise by providing Inspection, Certification and Test Organization services in more than 40 countries all over the world. Thanks to a presence in 11 countries and more than 550 experts, Certifer provides independent safety assessment, independent checking engineer, assessment body, independent cybersecurity assessment and test organization services.
https://hyperloop-one.com/certifer-confirms-virgin-hyperloop-one-technology-ready-independent-third-party-safety-assessment
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