Support the Arctic Sea Ice Forum and Blog

Author Topic: But, but, but India...  (Read 34545 times)

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 17998
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 803
  • Likes Given: 316
Re: But, but, but India...
« Reply #100 on: June 23, 2017, 02:30:05 AM »
World's biggest coal company closes 37 mines as solar power's influence grows
Quote
The largest coal mining company in the world has announced it will close 37 mines because they are no longer economically viable.

Coal India, which produces around 82 per cent of India's coal, said the mines would be decommissioned by March 2018.

The closures, of around 9 per cent of the state-run firm's sites, will reportedly save around 8,000,000,000 rupees (£98m).

India's solar sector has received heavy international investment, and the plummeting price of solar electricity has increased pressure on fossil fuel companies in the country.

The government has announced it will not build any more coal plants after 2022 and predicts renewables will generate 57 per cent of its power by 2027 – a pledge far outstripping its commitment in the Paris climate change agreement.

Plans for nearly 14 gigawatts of coal-fired power stations – about the same as the total amount in the UK – were scrapped in May, signalling a seismic shift in the India's energy market.
...
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/coal-india-closes-37-mines-solar-power-sustainable-energy-market-influence-pollution-a7800631.html
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 17998
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 803
  • Likes Given: 316
Re: But, but, but India...
« Reply #101 on: July 05, 2017, 07:05:29 PM »
Nice effort.  I wonder how many will survive?

India plants 66 million trees in 12 hours in record-breaking bid to meet Paris Agreement promise
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-07-05/india-breaks-record-planting-66-million-trees-in-12-hours/8677302
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Paddy

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 668
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 57
  • Likes Given: 60
Re: But, but, but India...
« Reply #102 on: November 07, 2017, 09:25:02 AM »
A good summary of the state of play in India, where on the one hand CO2 emissions are rising with a high potential to increase further, and on the other hand renewables and a backlash against the air pollution caused by coal power and road traffic are on the rise:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/nov/06/how-indias-battle-with-climate-change-could-determine-all-of-our-fates

Tom_Mazanec

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 3353
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 562
  • Likes Given: 263
Re: But, but, but India...
« Reply #103 on: September 18, 2019, 07:36:27 PM »
As the Monsoon and Climate Shift, India Faces Worsening Floods
https://e360.yale.edu/features/as-the-monsoon-and-climate-shift-india-faces-worsening-floods
Quote
Extreme precipitation events are on the rise in India, driven by warming temperatures and changes in the monsoon. The resulting floods are being exacerbated by unplanned urban growth and environmental degradation, driving millions from their homes and causing widespread damage.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

rboyd

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1331
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 232
  • Likes Given: 52
Re: But, but, but India...
« Reply #104 on: December 16, 2019, 03:25:16 AM »
Slowdown Blues: It's not ordinary but 'Great Slowdown', Indian economy headed towards ICU, says ex-CEA Arvind Subramanian

Looks like India is going into a significant recession, industrial production is already negative year over year. Y-o-y gdp growth of 4.5% is very slow for a developing nation like India.

Quote
Look at electricity generation growth, it's falling off the bottom, and it's never been like this ever. So this is the sense in which I would say this is not just any slowdown, this is the great slowdown that India is experiencing and we should look at it with all seriousness ...and the economy seems headed for the intensive care unit

The result is being seen with falling electricity demand, and therefore falling coal demand (helped by weather that delivered more rain for hydropower and beneficial wind trends).

https://www.businesstoday.in/current/slowdown-blues/slowdown-blues-not-ordinary-but-great-slowdown-indian-economy-headed-towards-icu-arvind-subramanian/story/392071.html
« Last Edit: December 16, 2019, 03:57:14 AM by rboyd »

Ken Feldman

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1366
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 203
  • Likes Given: 126
Re: But, but, but India...
« Reply #105 on: December 17, 2019, 08:14:50 PM »
Renewable energy is one sector of the Indian economy that continues to grow despite the economic slowdown.

https://thebulletin.org/2019/12/good-news-for-climate-change-india-gets-out-of-coal-and-into-renewable-energy/

Quote
Good news for climate change: India gets out of coal and into renewable energy

By Tim Buckley, December 16, 2019

In the often grim world of climate reporting, there is at least one upbeat story: India has been aggressively pivoting away from coal-fired power plants and towards electricity generated by solar, wind, and hydroelectric power. This means that the amount of carbon dioxide the country emits into the atmosphere should come down dramatically.

Quote
Consequently, with this massive reduction in the cost of renewables, India is able to shift away from the world’s dirtiest fossil fuel, and to much cleaner sources. It’s a stunning change, and one that could have profound implications on the world energy market. While western countries continue to baulk at reducing their reliance on fossil fuels, India is accelerating its plans to lock in a sustained, aggressive reduction in the carbon emissions intensity of its economy. In fact, India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, is targeting a fivefold expansion of the electricity generated from renewable energy sources by 2030—and this from a country that has already doubled its renewable energy in the past three years.

Quote
The rapid diversification of India’s electricity sector is creating an abundance of jobs and bringing an influx of new investment—needing to reach $500 billion over the coming decade if the targets are to be met—while reducing India’s emissions profile.



Quote
The bidding for renewable projects became so frenetic that five leading Indian billionaires wrote a joint letter to the prime minister demanding limits to the injections of foreign capital. They said they could not compete with the flood of international investment that was driving electricity prices  down and crowding out India’s domestic giants. The government reluctantly complied, putting a cap of $1 billion per bid per participant. An astonishingly good problem to have! India had been suffering from acute electricity supply shortages for a decade and now it was being overwhelmed with new investment in ultra-low cost electricity supply.

The result? The government of India enabled $40 billion of new investment and a doubling of renewable energy capacity in just over three years, to 83 gigawatts by September 2019, with another 45 gigawatts of large scale hydro-electricity. (To give a sense of scale, the Hoover Dam generates 2 gigawatts.)

Buoyed by the success, India’s initial target of 175 gigawatts of renewable energy capacity by 2022 was expanded to a target of 275 gigawatts by 2027. Then in September 2019, Prime Minister Modi proclaimed a new target of 450 gigawatts by 2030, or another $500 billion of investment in the coming decade.



rboyd

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1331
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 232
  • Likes Given: 52
Re: But, but, but India...
« Reply #106 on: January 26, 2020, 02:57:19 AM »
India installed 7.5 GW of solar power and 2.4 GW of wind energy in 2019

Seems lots of implementation issues led to delays of projects, pushing them into 2020 and reducing the 2019 installations below forecasts.

Quote
Unfortunately, total solar capacity additions fell short of projections due in large part to project delays across the industry and which are now likely to be commissioned in the first half of 2020.

These project delays were caused by a variety of issues, including land acquisition issues, execution delays, delays caused by secondary power off-takers in submitting approvals, policy uncertainty, and the withdrawal of open access benefits, re-tendering, etc.

While wind energy accounts for a larger share of India’s current renewable energy share, it nevertheless accounted for a smaller increase in 2019 capacity additions, installing 2.4GW, increasing total wind capacity by 10%.

Again, however, the majority of wind projects allocated in 2018 and scheduled to be commissioned in 2019 were delayed and are now set to be commissioned this year. These delays were primarily due to various land availability issues and lack of grid transmission availability.

https://www.evwind.es/2020/01/24/india-installed-7-5-gw-of-solar-power-and-2-4-gw-of-wind-energy-in-2019/73225