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kassy

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #150 on: October 03, 2019, 12:32:18 AM »
I don´t think any of the publicity related to those events did anything. For the majority of people it always was a ´someone else will fix it´ problem or not even on the radar.

Anyway we need action now and that is not fearmongering so it is good that people are starting to put pressure on governments with the protests and also targeted legal action.
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

VideoGameVet

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #151 on: October 03, 2019, 02:29:55 AM »
Wili, the Kochs spend so much money on misinformation campaigns that your uncle heard climate 'change is a hoax' 100 times more often than the truth. Marketing works.

And for any dollar spend on manipulating the public opinion they earned 100 times the amount by keeping polluting the earth.

Yep

"Humans went to the moon on purpose. We destroyed an entire planet by just not caring."

Archimid

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #152 on: October 03, 2019, 05:24:20 AM »

Odd, as your loast post in when will the arctic be ice-free thread stated that an ice-free condition will occur around 2031 - definitely not next decade.  The evidence that this state will be catastrophic is severly lacking.

Your fear plays tricks on you. I said it was likely to happen next decade, and I said it because to the best of my understanding the most likely date is somewhere around 2031 plus or minus some years. A BOE could happen any year now, given a low enough max volume like  2016-2017 and a strong melt season like 2012, 2016 and 2019. Thus the event of an ice-free Arctic next decade is very possible.


On the destructiveness of an ice-free arctic on the NH climate, I'm so sorry that you don't get it. It is difficult to explain the obvious to someone who doesn't want to understand the obvious.

A very dry, cold, old, central and large part of the world is undergoing an extraordinarily fast change. That change propagates to the rest of the NH. Climate Change like this happened before in the history of the earth, but never as fast (except the dinosaurs) and always followed by extinction.

A change this large, this fast, has certainly not happened in the history of human civilization, much less to a modern world with 7 billion people.
 

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Fearmongering will not help the situation. 

 I am not fearmongering, because the threat is as real as it gets. I'm warning whoever would listen about the threat as best as I understand it, and I have made a considerable effort in understanding the threat.

On the other hand, you are telling people to ignore the danger. Pffft. I almost feel sorry for you when you finally realize your error.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

nukefix

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #153 on: October 03, 2019, 10:10:03 AM »
Yep

What is the original source of this graph?

Klondike Kat

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #154 on: October 03, 2019, 02:58:13 PM »
Archimid, it is not a matter of "getting it."  I "get it."  We just differ on the outcome.  The arctic sea ice minimum has decreased by more than 40% over the last three decades.  The changes that have resulted have not been catastrophic.  What makes you think that another 40% will make such a big difference.  I am not the only scientist who disagrees with your prediction.

https://climatetippingpoints.info/2019/04/02/fact-check-will-an-ice-free-arctic-trigger-a-climate-catastrophe/

gerontocrat

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #155 on: October 03, 2019, 05:07:08 PM »
Nature abhors a straight line though a straight line might fit the data for a good many years.

Many natural systems can take punishment with little visible effect for a long time until......
My favourite one is adding nitrates and phosphates to a water body with little impact. Then a tiny bit more and poof! Eutrophication.
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #156 on: October 03, 2019, 07:39:20 PM »
In Saratoga Springs, experts talk climate change impacts on invasive species
https://www.timesunion.com/news/article/In-Saratoga-Springs-experts-talk-climate-change-14486536.php
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“Longer growing seasons are virtually certain,” said Bethany Bradley, an associate professor of ecology at the University of Massachusetts. With longer seasons due to earlier springs, almost all plants will do better. And  more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere can also promote plant growth. But invasive species – plants, insects or animals — are so-named in part because of their ability to out-compete other species.
Good news/Bad news joke:
Good news - in the long run invasive species are good for biodiversity.
Bad news - the long run is about ten million years.

Soaring eagle films crumbling Alpine glaciers as Earth warms
https://www.kansascity.com/news/nation-world/article235715672.html
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Disintegrating permafrost, which now glues a glacier’s rocks together, can cause them to crumble with potentially devastating consequences.
Victor’s flight comes as Italian authorities are scrambling to respond to fears that part of a large Italian glacier near Mont Blanc is on the verge of collapsing. They’ve warned that falling ice could endanger homes and people in the Val Ferret area, a popular hiking area.
At the rate the planet is warming, it’s too late to save the Alps’ glaciers, Freedom Conservation Managing Director Ronald Menzel said. But it’s not too late to fight climate change more broadly. He hopes Victor’s popularity will spur viewers into action.
There are no glaciers within a couple thousand miles of me. Someday there may be none anywhere.

Climate change is coming for our toilets. Here’s how we can stop it.
https://grist.org/article/climate-change-is-coming-for-our-toilets-heres-how-we-can-stop-it/
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While the report is not specifically about your bathroom, per se, it shows how a stealthy threat — sea-level rise — could make it more difficult for people with septic systems to flush their toilets. A brief primer on septic systems, which are common in rural areas: The stuff in your toilet goes into an underground tank, where it breaks down (I’m gagging) and gets drained out into a leach field (gross) that’s at least 20 feet from your house. In order to function properly, those drainage fields have to be relatively dry.
My late uncle had a septic tank and had all kinds of problems with it even without sea level rise (he lived in Ohio like me). This is one problem I would not want.

STORM FORCE Storm Lorenzo – Climate change expert’s grim warning for Ireland as he predicts Storm Lorenzo is ‘sign of things to come’
https://www.thesun.ie/news/4615021/irish-weather-forecast-storm-lorenzo-climate-change-warning/
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Dr O'Dwyer said that as the earth heats up as a result of climate change, there is more moisture in the atmosphere than cooler air - which is then available to storm systems.
He told the Irish Sun: "As the earth warms as a result of manmade climate change, the atmosphere can contain more moisture than cooler air.
"This extra moisture is available to storm systems, resulting in heavier rainfall. Climate projections suggest an increase in the occurrence of hurricanes into the future."
And he cautioned that Ireland is not ready to feel the force of such weather events.
284 years passed between the Great Storms of 1703 and 1987. How long till the next one?

n Houston, a Rash of Storms Tests the Limits of Coping With Climate Change
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/02/climate/hurricane-adaptation-houston.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Fclimate
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Houston’s challenge reflects the dilemma facing cities everywhere: As the climate changes, disasters aren’t just becoming more severe, but also more frequent. So even as the amount of damage increases, governments and residents have less time to repair before the next storm hits. And structural changes that might reduce cities’ exposure require years or decades to complete.
And by the time those adaptations are installed, the effects have grown even greater still.

Washington's coastal tribes are working to escape rising sea levels. A bill in D.C. could help
https://crosscut.com/2019/10/washingtons-coastal-tribes-are-working-escape-rising-sea-levels-bill-dc-could-help
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For the Native tribes that have historically lived along Washington’s Pacific coast, the threat of rising waters is real and imminent. As a result, many must grapple with the forced relocation of entire villages to higher ground before their homes are submerged.
D.C. might be able to pay for thousands of Indians to move. Will they be able to pay for millions of people?

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VideoGameVet

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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #158 on: October 04, 2019, 04:40:23 PM »
‘Prepare now or pay later’: Financial regulators must account for climate change risk to corporate bottom lines, Citigroup says
https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/02/financial-regulators-climate-change-risk-to-corporate-bottom-lines.html
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Financial regulators must transform how they account for the economic risks of climate change, Citigroup said in a new report Wednesday.
The report on climate risk comes shortly after a slew of extreme weather events across the world.
Most recently, Hurricane Dorian stalled over and decimated the Bahamas, and raging wildfires have destroyed a large swath of Amazon and Bolivian rainforests.
For major companies across the world, trillions of dollars are at stake as climate change threatens to disrupt their supply chains.
A trillion here, a trillion there, and pretty soon you are talking real money.

Amazon wildfires causing spike in children's breathing problems
https://www.channel3000.com/health/amazon-wildfires-causing-spike-in-childrens-breathing-problems/1128589519
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Wildfires raging in the Amazon rainforest are driving a spike in breathing problems and hospitalizations among children in Brazil, according to a new report.
The fires, which have now been burning for months, are posing "a major risk to the health of the population," said the report, published Wednesday by public health research institute Oswaldo Cruz Foundation
My cousin in Colorado commented how bad the air was there from the fires, and Colorado doesn't hold a candle to Brazil.

Heartbreaking photos show emaciated grizzly bears wandering through the Canadian wilderness after freak salmon shortage caused by warming waters and open fish farming - just one month before they're supposed to go into hibernation
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7532501/Heartbreaking-photos-emaciated-grizzly-bears-Canada-salmon-shortage.html
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Shocking photos of an emaciated mother grizzly bear and her two starving cubs have gone viral
Photographer Rolf Hicker snapped the animals searching for food on the Knight Inlet in British Columbia
He said he saw the bears several times, desperately searching for food amid a salmon shortage
Commercial fishermen in British Columbia have called this year the worst salmon season in nearly 50 years
A report by Fisheries and Oceans Canada said that climate change is negatively impacting the fish stocks
Each little hole in the ecoweb weakens the natural environment a little more. Eventually it will collapse.

Record Heat Thrusts Hawaii Corals Into ‘New Era’ Of Bleaching
https://www.civilbeat.org/2019/10/record-heat-thrusts-hawaii-corals-into-new-era-of-bleaching/
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The reefs have never had to endure such conditions. Marine scientists remain optimistic but warn that time is running out for society to step up.
Corals survived the Permian Extinction. Will they survive the Holocene Extinction?

Tracking the Atlantic Ocean's Inland Creep in Miami-Dade County
https://www.circleofblue.org/2019/world/tracking-the-atlantic-oceans-inland-creep-in-miami-dade-county/
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Rising seas are a visible threat to coastal areas. But the danger above is mirrored below in the form of rising salt concentrations in many coastal aquifers. In Miami-Dade County, the USGS study mapped the boundary where salt water meets the base of the Biscayne. Because it is less dense, fresh water sits on top of the saltwater wedge, which is thickest near the coast and thinner inland
Will it be "Water, water, everywhere, and nary a drop to drink?

Radical warming in Siberia leaves millions on unstable ground
https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/national/climate-environment/climate-change-siberia/
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A Washington Post analysis found that the region near the town of Zyryanka, in an enormous wedge of eastern Siberia called Yakutia, has warmed by more than 3 degrees Celsius since preindustrial times — roughly triple the global average.
The permafrost that once sustained farming — and upon which villages and cities are built — is in the midst of a great thaw, blanketing the region with swamps, lakes and odd bubbles of earth that render the land virtually useless.
You would think Siberia would welcome warmer weather, but this shows the answer is "Nope!"
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #159 on: October 04, 2019, 11:04:43 PM »
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Corals survived the Permian Extinction. Will they survive the Holocene Extinction?
The end-Permian extinction event, "during which 96% of marine species were wiped out" [link] had remarkably different kinds of corals before and after the extinction.  Yes, corals then and corals now, but with a 1.5 million year gap in-between, it's like saying "reptiles before and reptiles after the extinction event", with no regard to what type of reptiles.
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #160 on: October 06, 2019, 08:08:40 PM »

A monster grew in the Gulf of Mexico. Here’s why more may follow
https://www.jacksonville.com/news/20191005/monster-grew-in-gulf-of-mexico-heres-why-more-may-follow
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Hurricane Michael grew to Category 5 prowess in an overly warm Gulf of Mexico that likely will continue to heat with climate change.
In the record-hot Florida fall of 2018, Hurricane Michael was rabid with hidden energy absorbed from a Gulf of Mexico 4 to 6 degrees warmer than normal
And the sea level in the Gulf of Mexico is rising. And the land is sinking. Get ready to move!

This depressing map of the Arctic lets you track 40 years of melting sea ice
https://www.fastcompany.com/90412968/this-depressing-map-of-the-arctic-lets-you-track-40-years-of-melting-sea-ice
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As the world reckons with a climate in crisis, marching in the streets, and demanding world leaders and corporate honchos act to get greenhouse-gas emissions under control, oceans are storing the excess heat made by humankind’s bad choices. As the ocean warms, temperatures under the world’s ice sheets heat up. And as everyone who has ever waited too long to chug a slushy knows, when ice gets warm, it melts. That includes some of the older ice that one NASA researcher says serves as an “insurance policy” for the rest of the ice pack.
Will we live to see this forum's main topic become just a memory?

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bbr2314

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #161 on: October 06, 2019, 11:53:48 PM »
The worst consequence of AGW could also technically be its solution. New modeling shows a nuclear exchange on the Indian subcontinent would be very effective in overwhelming the warming residual from +GHG. I wonder if Washington, Moscow, Beijing, London, Paris, Pyongyang, and Tel Aviv would sacrifice a billion or three untouchables so way of life for the elites can continue. I would think it would be perceived to be a reasonable trade-off.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/10/misery-of-a-nuclear-war-between-india-and-pakistan-would-be-global/


Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #162 on: October 08, 2019, 03:47:16 PM »
bbr2314:
Nuclear winter lasts on the scale of months to years.
Global Warming lasts on the scale of centuries to millennia.
Do we have to have a thousand nuclear wars to solve this problem permanently?
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #163 on: October 08, 2019, 04:26:00 PM »
Climate change poses menace to wild bees
https://www.dailysabah.com/environment/2019/10/07/climate-change-poses-menace-to-wild-bees
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With many wild bee species only able to survive within specific temperature ranges, global warming has placed the global bee population in peril.
"Global warming is believed to be a major driver of wild bee declines. Some wild bees can only survive in a narrow range of temperatures. As their habitats get warmer, the places where they can live grow smaller," said Philip Donkersley, senior research associate in entomology – the study of insects – at the U.K.'s Lancaster University.
I once read if all the bees died, humanity would be extinct in two years.

The Gulf Of Maine Is Warming, And Its Whales Are Disappearing
https://www.wgbh.org/news/local-news/2019/10/06/the-gulf-of-maine-is-warming-and-its-whales-are-disappearing
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But lately, the whales have been harder and harder to find. Waters in the gulf have been warming, sending the whales' food supply searching for cooler temperatures. The whales have gone with them. Some days this summer, Parker says he didn't spot a single one. Business fell 20%, forcing him to cut his season short.
When they run out of cooler water maybe we can send the Starship Enterprise back in time to get some if Vger comes.

Diseases like West Nile, EEE and flesh-eating bacteria are flourishing due to climate change
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/10/05/climate-change-worsen-diseases-equine-encephalitis-west-nile-dengue-fever/3859382002/
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An outbreak of a deadly and rare brain disease has killed at least 11 people in the United States so far this year. Scientists say the mosquito-borne illness, Eastern equine encephalitis, may be worse because of unseasonably warm temperatures. It’s one of just several diseases scientists worry are being affected by climate change.
Which tropical disease do you want to die from?

OPINION: Climate crisis: We are running out of time
http://www.thedutchharborfisherman.com/article/1941climate_crisis_we_are_running_out_of_time
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Our Yupik people of Sivuqaq (our traditional name for St. Lawrence Island) are witnesses to the massive die-offs of seabirds, seals and whales. We have coexisted with these animals for thousands of years. These massive die-offs are a warning to us all and a threat to our culture and to the very existence of our Sivuqaq Yupik people of Alaska and the Arctic. We are overwhelmed with concern about the health harms associated with climate change, the loss of sea ice and melting permafrost and the mobilization of chemicals and plastics — these are all interconnected.
We are running out of time!
Actually, we have probably already run out of time.

Peruvian Glaciers Have Shrunk By 30 Percent Since 2000
https://e360.yale.edu/digest/peruvian-glaciers-have-shrunk-by-30-percent-since-2000
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Nearly 30 percent of Peru’s glaciers have melted away since 2000, threatening a critical source of drinking water and irrigation for millions of people downstream, according to a new study published in the journal The Cryosphere. Overall, the country lost nearly 8 gigatons of ice from 2000 to 2016, with 170 glaciers — covering an area equivalent to 80,000 soccer fields — disappearing entirely.
If it's not one thing it is another. No part of the world will escape the consequences og AGW.

In the Mountains, Climate Change Is Disrupting Everything, from How Water Flows to When Plants Flower
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/07102019/mountain-climate-change-disruption-glaciers-water-ecosystems-agriculture-plants-food
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With ominous orange-gray smoke clouds seething on the western horizon, it's easy to understand how Colorado's highest city and other mountain communities are directly threatened by global warming.
Mountain snowpack is shrinking and melting earlier in the spring. Warmer and longer summers dry out vegetation and increase the threat of wildfires in western mountain forests, where the fire season has lengthened by at least a month since 1979.
The growing wildfire risk is just part of an accelerating cycle of global warming impacts in the world's mountain regions, according to a new Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report that includes a section focused on mountains for the first time in more than 20 years.
We will be killed by the Orient Express method...a dozen different things working together to finish us off.

Tropical fish, microplastics and disappearing beaches: Climate change along the Central Coast
https://www.kcrw.com/news/shows/kcrw-features/tropical-fish-microplastic-and-disappearing-beaches-climate-change-along-the-central-coast
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Butterfly Beach in Montecito is popular among beachgoers. But 30 years from now, there won’t be much of it left to enjoy.
“You're going to have more hours a day where the waves are just lapping up onto the seawall,” said Monique Myers, a California Sea Grant researcher studying the vulnerability of Santa Barbara’s coast.
Sea levels are expected to rise by about a foot by 2050, according to Myers.
And while coasts are getting too much water, interiors are in drought. It's like having to pee while dying of thirst.

What Climate Change Could Do to Cities' Power to Borrow Money
https://www.citylab.com/environment/2019/10/climate-change-could-make-borrowing-costlier-states-and-cities/599464/
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Someday soon, analysts will determine that a city or county, or maybe a school district or utility, is so vulnerable to sea level rise, flooding, drought, or wildfire that it is an investment risk.
Already many cities are in a cash crisis situation. What happens if they become considered climate risks?

New England winters are on the decline due to climate change, study says
https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/10/07/study-new-england-winters-are-decline-due-climate-change/vvlEmJw38WyF5fIpS7jABP/story.html
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New Englanders may take cold, snowy winters for granted, but those are in jeopardy due to climate change — and that could affect everything from forest ecosystems to human health, researchers say.
Alexandra Contosta, assistant professor at the University of New Hampshire’s Earth Systems Research Center, and her team looked at 100 years of weather station data from forests in the northern United States and Canada, and found that milder winters are having widespread impacts, she said.
I don't like winter (as I don't like bees...see above) but I am smart enough o know we need them both.

How extreme sea level events are going to increase in Australia
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/ng-interactive/2019/oct/08/how-extreme-sea-level-events-are-going-to-increase-in-australia
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A major new report predicts extreme sea level events that used to occur once every hundred years will occur at least once a year in many regions around the world by 2050.
The Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change looks at the impacts of climate change on glaciers and ice sheets, sea level rise, extreme sea level events and ocean ecosystems.
With immediate cuts to carbon emissions, scientists expect sea level rise of 30cm-60cm by 2100. Without cuts in carbon emissions, the ocean is expected to rise between 61cm and 110cm.
I will turn 92 in 2050. My uncle is older than that, so I might make it and see the first happen. If you are young enough, you might live to see 2100 and see the real disaster.
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #164 on: October 10, 2019, 07:14:03 PM »
How Climate Change And Flash Flooding Is Affecting Communities Across The Country
https://www.npr.org/2019/10/08/768373866/how-climate-change-and-flash-flooding-is-affecting-communities-across-the-countr
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Climate change is driving deadly flash flooding across America. In one Maryland town, back-to-back flooding has forced residents to make huge decisions about how their community will adapt.
Can you swim in a raging flash flood? And even if you can, is your home waterproof?

Climate change will make California wildfires even worse
https://www.futurity.org/wildfires-climate-change-california-2179612/
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The severity of wildfires in the Sierra Nevada region of California has been sensitive to changes in climate over the past 1,400 years, according to new research.
Forget water, are you and your home fireproof?

What Happens When Your Town Dries Up?
https://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/599635/dry-town-central-valley/
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“In bigger cities, we are often insulated from the direct impacts of climate change and how it affects our immediate environments,” Vaughan-Lee said. “We see hotter days, erratic weather, and, most recently, fires—but we aren’t as close to the front lines as many of these smaller towns and communities.”
Fortunately, the California drought has relented in recent months. But many believe this to be a short-lived respite. “The aquifer in the Central Valley is being depleted at a rate much higher than can be replenished by rains, so it’s only a matter of time before farming becomes unviable,” Vaughan-Lee said. “When this happens, many towns in the Central Valley may not survive.”
You may not drown in a drought, but you may starve in droughts grow enough to endanger food production.

Want to know what climate change feels like? Ask an Alaskan.
https://grist.org/article/want-to-know-what-climate-change-feels-like-ask-an-alaskan/
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Adrienne Titus was heading back to her parents’ village on a sweltering afternoon in early July when she saw the dead salmon. She had been fishing upstream with her mother on the banks of the gorgeous Unalakleet River, which Chinook, pink, coho, and chum salmon travel up every year in order to spawn. Down closer to the village of Unalakleet, though, there were no signs of life on the water that day — just hundreds of soft bodies floating belly up.
Titus, a 39-year-old Iñupiat woman who lives in Fairbanks but grew up in Unalakleet, had never seen anything like it before. Neither had her mother, or any of the village elders that they asked in this small fishing community on the shores of the Norton Sound in the central Bering Sea.
“It was scary,” Titus said. “It put fear into us.”
Similar reports of dead pink salmon came in all across the Norton Sound that week as temperatures soared into the high 80s and low 90s during a statewide heatwave that “re-wrote the record books,” according to the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration. Fisheries biologists say that’s no coincidence: Warm water stresses the animals out, and temperatures above a certain threshold can kill them. In a statement issued on July 11, the Norton Sound Economic Development Corporation warned that the salmon die-offs appeared to be part of a “larger ecosystem-level shift” taking place due to rising temperatures.
Even if you don't eat fish, there are other things you eat that will be killed off. And even if not, people switching from fish will raise your food prices.

Climate Change Already Altering Ozark Forests Composition, Researcher Says
https://www.kuaf.com/post/climate-change-already-altering-ozark-forests-composition-researcher-says#stream/0
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University of Missouri-Columbia research associate professor ermeritus of forest health and mycology, Johann Bruhn, says climate change is already affecting Ozark forests. Bruhn travels with Citizen Climate Lobby Missouri co-coordinator, George Laur, educating the public. The USDA Forest Service has launched an online Climate Change Resource Center to provide guidance.
I love forests. I would hate to see them pass away.

Sea-level rise threatens 13 million Americans. Can FEMA help?
https://grist.org/article/sea-level-rise-threatens-13-million-americans-can-fema-help/
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But in many respects Yang’s realism is spot on. If the world keeps burning fossil fuels as usual, between four and 13 million Americans will see their homes inundated by sea-level rise this century. In the future, managed retreat will become unavoidable.
This is one to four percent of all Americans. And America is probably the best situated country to handle Sea Level Rise.

Climate change is already harming Great Lakes region, Debbie Stabenow warns
https://www.mlive.com/public-interest/2019/10/climate-change-is-already-harming-great-lakes-region-debbie-stabenow-warns.html
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A "climate crisis" is affecting Michigan’s economy, agriculture, public health and the Great Lakes, according to a new report.
This hits me where I live.
Literally.

One Thing You Can Do: Talk to Your Children About Climate Change
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/09/climate/children-anxiety-climate-newsletter-nyt.html
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Climate change and related natural disasters can take a toll on mental health, according to a 2017 report by the American Psychological Association. That can include depression and anxiety. Children may be one of the hardest-hit groups.
I grew up during the Cold War. I remember having nuclear nightmares.

What will we lose? Tracking climate change in Yellowstone
https://www.bozemandailychronicle.com/news/environment/what-will-we-lose-tracking-climate-change-in-yellowstone/article_2cd9181a-4a05-527c-aaf3-3fbad9596cee.html
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The Yellowstone scientist best known for his work on wolves is now leading a study of jays, warblers and sparrows, among other bird species. His researchers wake up obscenely early, leave the office by 3:30 a.m., and are in the woods listening for bird calls before the sun comes up.
The goal is to figure out what migratory and resident birds are living in old growth, subalpine forests consisting of spruce and fir trees — a forest type climate change could erase.
I went to Yellowstone National park twice. It is my favorite spot in the world. But even this is not safe.

How The Ala Wai Flood Project Illustrates The Challenge Of Adapting To Climate Change
https://www.hawaiipublicradio.org/post/how-ala-wai-flood-project-illustrates-challenge-adapting-climate-change#stream/0
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But climate change-fueled storms are now at risk of overwhelming that system.
As the atmosphere warms, it is able to hold more water vapor. That means when storms form, they can deposit a higher volume of water in the form of rain. We saw this at work during the 2018 “rain bomb” floods in Hanalei and Aina Haina.
At just under 50 inches of rain, the Hanalei event set the current record for highest 24-hour rainfall total in the United States. It caused an estimated $125 million in damage.
Such an event would cause over $1 billion worth of destruction in the Ala Wai watershed — home to the state’s economic engine, Waikiki. That damage estimate comes from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the federal agency charged with managing the nation’s waterways.
A billion here, a billion there, pretty soon you are talking real money.

How climate change primed California’s power shutdown
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/10/climate-change-california-power-outage/
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Frequent fires are part of California’s natural state. Many of its ecosystems, from the chaparral of Southern California to the northern pine forests, evolved to burn frequently. But since the 1980s, the size and ferocity of the fires that sweep across the state have trended upward: Fifteen of the 20 largest fires in California history have occurred since 2000. And since the 1970s, the amount of area burned in the state has increased by a factor of five.
Climate change’s fingerprint is evident in many of the fires, scientists say, primarily because hotter air means drier plants, which burn more readily
Over the past century, California has warmed by about 3 degrees Fahrenheit, more than the global average of about one degree Fahrenheit. Hotter air draws water out of plants and soils more efficiently than cool, leaving the trees, shrubs, and rolling grasslands of the state dry and primed to burn.

These State Birds May Be Forced Out of Their States as the World Warms
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/10/climate/state-birds-climate-change.html
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New research shows that hundreds of North American birds are at risk of major habitat disruption from climate change.
I wonder if our state bird (Ohio Cardinal IIRC) is one of these?
« Last Edit: October 10, 2019, 07:19:52 PM by Tom_Mazanec »
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #165 on: October 13, 2019, 07:27:20 PM »
Hikers: Beware of Falling Trees
https://www.outsideonline.com/2402646/falling-trees-deaths-hiking-danger
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In California and Colorado, there are forests with more dead trees still standing, known as snags. An unprecedented 129 million trees in California have died from drought and bark beetles since 2010. All of those dead trees, in addition to the deadwood that has accumulated over a century of fire suppression, can lead to the kind of massive, out-of-control wildfires that have plagued California in recent years. These fires, of course, kill even more trees, and burn areas are particularly at risk for falling timber. In Colorado, there were 834 million snags as of 2017, or one in 14 trees—30 percent more than in 2010. Plus both the Pacific Crest and Colorado Trails go through extensive burn areas. The issue of dead timber is likely to worsen, due to the ongoing climate crisis.
“As the climate gets dryer and hotter, these problems are going to become even greater, at least until we change the way our forests are managed,” says Trimble.
Another consequence I did not think of.

Four Ways Alaska’s Unending Warming Impacts Everyone
https://therevelator.org/alaska-warming-impacts-everyone/
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Melting Sea Ice Accelerates Warming…and May Disrupt Global Weather Patterns
Increasing Wildfires Torch the “Legacy Carbon” of Northern Forests
Alaska’s Melting Glaciers Raise Global Sea Levels
Thawing Permafrost and the Carbon Bomb
What happens in Alaska does not stay in Alaska.

FEMA Bought 44,000 Flood-Prone Homes. They May Have to Buy Millions More
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-10-09/fema-may-have-to-buy-millions-of-homes-due-to-climate-crisis
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This 30 year-trickle is nothing compared with the great climate exodus to come. The potential number of homes that may be abandoned is staggering, said A.R. Siders, a co-author and assistant professor at University of Delaware’s Disaster Research Center. “There are 49 million housing units in at-risk areas on the U.S. coast, and over $1 trillion worth of infrastructure within 700 feet of the coast,” she said. The government isn't prepared to relocate even one-tenth of that, if it needed to, Siders said.
Maybe we can just put them in the deserts droughts will make?

Billions face food, water shortages over next 30 years as nature fails
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/10/billions-face-water-food-insecurity/#close
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A new model shows which areas of Earth will likely be hit the hardest by the changes caused by human activity, also revealing possible solutions.
That means basically everybody and their pets.

‘They should be allowed to cry’: Ecological disaster taking toll on scientists’ mental health
https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/ecological-disaster-mental-health-awareness-day-scientists-climate-change-grief-a9150266.html
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Leading researchers have published a letter saying many scientists experience “strong grief responses” to the ecological crisis and there are profound risks of ignoring this emotional trauma
When scientists start sobbing and weeping, you know it's time to panic.
 
Loons likely to disappear from Minnesota due to climate change, new report warns
http://www.startribune.com/loons-likely-to-disappear-from-minnesota-due-to-climate-change-new-report-warns/562874132/
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The black and white bird — whose haunting cries define Minnesota as much as lakes, snow and hot dish — is among 55 species likely to disappear from the state for the summer by 2080 if the world does nothing to cut greenhouse-gas emissions, according to a new report by the National Audubon Society, Survival by Degrees: 389 Bird Species on the Brink
How long until the humans vanish from Minnesota?

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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Worst consequence of AGW
« Reply #166 on: October 15, 2019, 08:28:09 PM »
Firms ignoring climate crisis will go bankrupt, says Mark Carney
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/oct/13/firms-ignoring-climate-crisis-bankrupt-mark-carney-bank-england-governor
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Companies and industries that are not moving towards zero-carbon emissions will be punished by investors and go bankrupt, the governor of the Bank of England has warned.
Mark Carney also told the Guardian it was possible that the global transition needed to tackle the climate crisis could result in an abrupt financial collapse. He said the longer action to reverse emissions was delayed, the more the risk of collapse would grow.
Do you own stock in a vulnerable company? Are you employed by a vulnerable company

This Is What Adapting to Climate Change Looks Like
https://www.citylab.com/environment/2019/10/what-adapting-climate-change-looks-like/599872/?utm_source=feed&silverid=%25%25RECIPIENT_ID%25%25
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California has always promised Americans a glimpse of the future. But this week, the Golden State is forecasting a future that nobody wants to live in.
Millions of people across California lost their power this week, after the local utility Pacific Gas and Electric intentionally shut off electrical lines to avoid starting wildfires in dangerously dry and windy conditions.
Try living without power for a few days. Preferably in a heat wave.

Forty Percent of Pennsylvania Bird Species Are Vulnerable to Climate Change
https://www.alleghenyfront.org/forty-percent-of-pennsylvania-bird-species-vulnerable-to-climate-change/
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“Forty percent of Pennsylvania’s 227 bird species are vulnerable to climate change,” said Greg Goldman, executive director of Audubon PA.  “Extreme spring heat is the greatest concern.”
The sound of the Great Horned Owl – so common in the woods of Pennsylvania today – could be less common if carbon emissions aren’t brought under control, said Goldman.
Another common sight in the region’s wetlands is the American black duck – not actually black but brown with a splash of purple on its wing.
“It’s a really iconic water bird, it’s here summer and winter,” said Beth Brown, director of Audubon PA’s Delaware River Watershed Program. “It’s kind of out there doing its job providing services in the ecosystem and it’s sort of your typical American duck.”
Brown says the American black duck is one of hundreds of birds nationwide that could lose habitat from a changing climate. Some are moving north, but that may not be an option for all of them.
Silent spring could happen even without DDT, just CO2.

Higher temperatures driving 'alarming' levels of hunger – report
https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2019/oct/15/higher-temperatures-driving-alarming-levels-hunger-report-climate-crisis
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Extreme weather events are putting food production and security in jeopardy and the risk is expected to increase. Food production is likely to fall due to higher temperatures, water scarcity, greater CO2 and extreme weather events. Yields of maize and wheat are already declining.
and
Global Hunger Index says progress isn't happening fast enough
https://www.fastcompany.com/90417159/the-people-who-are-going-to-be-starved-by-climate-change-didnt-cause-it
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A new report finds that the fight to end global hunger is being put at risk by the changing climate’s effect on agriculture.
And that blizzard in the United States we just had has ruined our season's late harvest.

Indigenous farming practices failing as climate change disrupts seasons
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/10/climate-change-killing-thousands-of-years-indigenous-wisdom/
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Climate change is upending millions of people’s lives, yet few communities are seeing their crops and worldviews crumble quite like those that rely on indigenous weather forecasting. Dependent in many cases on millennia-old trial and error, as well as analyses of the landscape to gauge planting cycles, their fields are withering as the conditions on which the calendars are predicated change. Without that accumulated wisdom to fall back on—bird migrations, wind direction, stars, and more—farmers are feeling particularly defenseless just as other consequences of climate change complicate their lives.
We will all see our eternal verities go by the wayside as climate changes.

Japan’s Seaweed Industry Is in Jeopardy
https://www.ozy.com/acumen/japans-seaweed-industry-is-in-jeopardy/219660/
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That’s pushing up prices and threatening a cherished staple of the Japanese diet. The disruption offers an early hint of how environmental change will affect food production, forcing long-standing industries to adapt.
The problems are twofold: warming seas and not enough pollution. Climate change has led to a significant rise in water temperatures around Japan in recent decades. “We don’t know the causes for sure, but I think the biggest factor here is global warming,” says Koizumi.
Sushi is coming to an end in Japan. What else will soon come to an end?

'I'm standing here in the middle of climate change': How USDA is failing farmers
https://www.politico.com/news/2019/10/15/im-standing-here-in-the-middle-of-climate-change-how-usda-fails-farmers-043615
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But the Agriculture Department is doing little to help farmers adapt to what experts predict is the new norm: increasingly extreme weather across much of the U.S. The department, which has a hand in just about every aspect of the industry, from doling out loans to subsidizing crop insurance, spends just 0.3 percent of its $144 billion budget helping farmers adapt to climate change, whether it’s identifying the unique risks each region faces or helping producers rethink their practices so they’re better able to withstand extreme rain and periods of drought.
And this year is already the worst for extreme farming weather in the USA in decades, if not ever.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS