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kassy

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Re: Wildfires
« Reply #1250 on: July 24, 2020, 05:54:25 PM »
Thanks!
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glennbuck

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Re: Wildfires
« Reply #1251 on: July 26, 2020, 05:20:58 PM »
Australia lost 14% of Forest Ha in one season!

Australia has a total of 134 million hectares of forest, which is equivalent to 17 per cent of Australia's land area. Of this total forest area, determined as at 2016, 132 million hectares (98 per cent) are 'Native forests', 1.95 million hectares are 'Commercial plantations' and 0.47 million hectares are 'Other forest'. Australia has about 3per cent of the world's forest area, and globally is the country with the seventh largest forest area.

18,736,070 Ha/46,300,000 acres lost in 2019/2020

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019%E2%80%9320_Australian_bushfire_season
« Last Edit: July 26, 2020, 08:03:48 PM by glennbuck »

bbr2315

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Re: Wildfires
« Reply #1252 on: July 26, 2020, 05:49:32 PM »
Australia lost 14% of Forest Ha in one season!

Australia has a total of 134 million hectares of forest, which is equivalent to 17per cent of Australia's land area. Of this total forest area, determined as at 2016, 132 million hectares (98 per cent) are 'Native forests', 1.95 million hectares are 'Commercial plantations' and 0.47 million hectares are 'Other forest'. Australia has about 3per cent of the world's forest area, and globally is the country with the seventh largest forest area.

18,736,070 Ha/46,300,000 acres lost in 2019/2020

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019%E2%80%9320_Australian_bushfire_season
No, Australia did not "lose" 14% of its forest coverage. 14% of Forest Ha burned, but it regrows explosively after fires. Although damage to the rainforests will take longer to recover and there may be new speciation in those areas, the % of area forested will not decrease, and in fact the regrowth is likely to be a net carbon sink IMO.

Australia is full of Eucalyptus.

https://wildfiretoday.com/2014/03/03/eucalyptus-and-fire/

Some, like the mighty, 100-metre-tall Eucalyptus regnans — also known as the mountain ash, stringy gum or Tasmanian oak — hold their seeds inside small, hard capsules; a fire will instantly trigger a massive drop of seeds to the newly fertilised ground.

Quote
The myriad bright green buds that sprout spectacularly from the trunks of other eucalypts in the aftermath of a big fire are another kind of regeneration mechanism, bursting through the scorched and blackened bark within weeks of a blaze.

Within five or six years, ‘a burned forest will be looking pretty good’, Kirkpatrick says. ‘And a large proportion of Tasmania’s flora fits into this fire ecology. Pea plants, wattles — their germination is stimulated by heat and smoke. Fire is really, really important in Tasmania.’

At the centre of it all, though, is the eucalypt. Because these trees do not just resist fire, they actively encourage it. ‘They withstand fire, they need fire; to some extent, they create fire,’ Bowman says. ‘The leaves, the bark, don’t decompose. They’re highly, highly flammable. And on a hot day, you can smell their oils.’

The bark and leaves of eucalypts seem almost made to promote fire. Some are known as stringyor candle-barks: long, easily lit strips hang loosely off their trunks and, once alight, whirl blazing up into the flammable canopy above, or are carried by the wind many kilometres ahead of a fire to speed its advance.”

I have personally seen the burning / regrowth cycle in Australia and it is extraordinarily rapid. While burnt-out forests are certainly a sad sight for human eyes, and the animal toll is devastating, massive bushfires have always been a reality, and are consequently actually a necessity for many species.

glennbuck

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Re: Wildfires
« Reply #1253 on: July 27, 2020, 12:37:37 PM »
Australia lost 14% of Forest Ha in one season!

Australia has a total of 134 million hectares of forest, which is equivalent to 17per cent of Australia's land area. Of this total forest area, determined as at 2016, 132 million hectares (98 per cent) are 'Native forests', 1.95 million hectares are 'Commercial plantations' and 0.47 million hectares are 'Other forest'. Australia has about 3per cent of the world's forest area, and globally is the country with the seventh largest forest area.

18,736,070 Ha/46,300,000 acres lost in 2019/2020

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019%E2%80%9320_Australian_bushfire_season
No, Australia did not "lose" 14% of its forest coverage. 14% of Forest Ha burned, but it regrows explosively after fires. Although damage to the rainforests will take longer to recover and there may be new speciation in those areas, the % of area forested will not decrease, and in fact the regrowth is likely to be a net carbon sink IMO.

Australia is full of Eucalyptus.

https://wildfiretoday.com/2014/03/03/eucalyptus-and-fire/

Some, like the mighty, 100-metre-tall Eucalyptus regnans — also known as the mountain ash, stringy gum or Tasmanian oak — hold their seeds inside small, hard capsules; a fire will instantly trigger a massive drop of seeds to the newly fertilised ground.

Quote
The myriad bright green buds that sprout spectacularly from the trunks of other eucalypts in the aftermath of a big fire are another kind of regeneration mechanism, bursting through the scorched and blackened bark within weeks of a blaze.

Within five or six years, ‘a burned forest will be looking pretty good’, Kirkpatrick says. ‘And a large proportion of Tasmania’s flora fits into this fire ecology. Pea plants, wattles — their germination is stimulated by heat and smoke. Fire is really, really important in Tasmania.’

At the centre of it all, though, is the eucalypt. Because these trees do not just resist fire, they actively encourage it. ‘They withstand fire, they need fire; to some extent, they create fire,’ Bowman says. ‘The leaves, the bark, don’t decompose. They’re highly, highly flammable. And on a hot day, you can smell their oils.’

The bark and leaves of eucalypts seem almost made to promote fire. Some are known as stringyor candle-barks: long, easily lit strips hang loosely off their trunks and, once alight, whirl blazing up into the flammable canopy above, or are carried by the wind many kilometres ahead of a fire to speed its advance.”

I have personally seen the burning / regrowth cycle in Australia and it is extraordinarily rapid. While burnt-out forests are certainly a sad sight for human eyes, and the animal toll is devastating, massive bushfires have always been a reality, and are consequently actually a necessity for many species.

Thanks for the update. Growing to full size takes an ash tree anywhere from 16 to 60 years. Might be losing more forest area quicker than it can recover if these summer bushfires continue to increase with rising temperatures.

Ash Tree Average Growth Rate

Trees of the Ash species are classified as moderately fast growing due to their ability to grow between 18 and 25 feet in a single decade. Some species, including European ash (Fraxinus excelsior), grow slightly more slowly, reaching a little less than 18 feet in 10 years. Most species average about 2 feet of growth per year for the first part of their life when planted as ornamentals, but they grow more slowly when used in a row with other trees.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2020, 12:56:29 PM by glennbuck »

Rodius

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Re: Wildfires
« Reply #1254 on: July 28, 2020, 01:48:47 AM »
While BBR is correct in that fires are a natural part of Australia, the scale of the 2020 fires is not natural.

14% is a huge percentage, and fires are only going to get worse on average as the climate warms.

A lot of animals died in the fires. Animals are an important part of recovery and they are not there. Research is still being conducted concerning regrowth, but that will take time, obviously.

The Blue Mountains were hit so hard that 293 threatened animals (with the koala effectively extinct in the region) and 680 threatened plants.

I wish it was a case of this being normal and recovery will be normal, but it wont be. The fires we massive, hot, fast moving and destroyed everything in their path. While recovery will happen, it is unlikely to return to the old normal.

And rainforests.... well, they have never burned. Tasmania lost a lot of rainforest that has never burned before, so that wont be recovering like other regions where plants and animals require fire to survive. The predictions are for more rainforest to burn as the years go by.

While the 2020 fire season has been the worst one to date, the expectation is they will get worse. And since 14% was burned this time, and the frequency of the fire events is increasing, the natural environment isn't going to get a chance to recover like before.

There is no good news about this years fires, and it is going to get worse. And it isn't helped when the Govt refuses to acknowledge climate change further than it is a natural change and there is nothing we can do about it.


https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/topics/parks-reserves-and-protected-areas/fire/park-recovery-and-rehabilitation/recovering-from-2019-20-fires/understanding-the-impact-of-the-2019-20-fires

glennbuck

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Re: Wildfires
« Reply #1255 on: July 28, 2020, 10:21:46 AM »
While BBR is correct in that fires are a natural part of Australia, the scale of the 2020 fires is not natural.

A lot of animals died in the fires. Animals are an important part of recovery and they are not there. Research is still being conducted concerning regrowth, but that will take time, obviously.



https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/topics/parks-reserves-and-protected-areas/fire/park-recovery-and-rehabilitation/recovering-from-2019-20-fires/understanding-the-impact-of-the-2019-20-fires

Nearly 3 billion animals were killed or displaced by Australia’s devastating bushfire season of 2019 and 2020, according to scientists who have revealed for the first time the scale of the impact on the country’s native wildlife.

The Guardian has learned that an estimated 143 million mammals, 180 million birds, 51 million frogs and a staggering 2.5 billion reptiles were affected by the fires that burned across the continent.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jul/28/almost-3-billion-animals-affected-by-australian-megafires-report-shows-aoe

gerontocrat

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Re: Wildfires
« Reply #1256 on: July 30, 2020, 10:14:36 PM »
Soon we will be asking  "where is it not burning?"

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jul/30/argentina-delta-fires-rage-out-of-control-parana-river
'Everything is burning': Argentina's delta fires rage out of control

Cattle ranching and drought have turned the Paraná River grasslands to tinder, threatening disaster for the area’s wildlife

Quote
A raging fire described as “completely out of control” is threatening one of South America’s major wetland ecosystems. The fire has been burning for months now, and is visible from the balconies of luxury apartments along the shoreline of the Paraná River in Argentina’s central city of Rosario.

n normal times, Rosario’s riverfront homes enjoy a spectacular view of the seemingly never-ending green grasslands on the opposite bank of the Paraná, a waterway stretching over a mile across as it passes through the city.

In recent months, however, dwellers in the luxury condos have been congregating on their balconies as the wall of red flames from thousands of fires raging through the Paraná delta grasslands rises high into the sky.

“Everything is burning, it’s completely out of control,” Leonel Mingo, a spokesperson for Greenpeace Argentina, told the Guardian. “Once a fire reaches that scale, it becomes virtually impossible to stop.”

The Paraná is South America’s second largest river after the Amazon and the eighth longest river in the world. Its floodplain, known by Rosarinos as “la isla”, is not actually an island, but a vast delta covering some 15,000km2 , through which the Paraná drains towards the Atlantic Ocean 300km away.

The giant delta is clearly visible in satellite imagery as a dark green wedge on the northern margin of the Paraná from Rosario to Buenos Aires.

Giant plumes of smoke from the fires raging since February have at times covered the streets of Rosario and other places along the Paraná with a layer of ash from scorched plants and animals. The air in Rosario has been unbreathable for weeks at a time.

Far from abating, the number of fires has been rising. Liotta works at the Scasso Natural Science Museum in San Nicolás, where he has been monitoring the delta fires via Nasa satellites. “We’ve identified 8,024 likely fires so far this year, almost half of them this month of July.”


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Liotta worked backwards and found the scale of the
calamity was unprecedented. “The average number of yearly satellite-detected hotspots was only 1,800 in 2012–2019. We’re already at over 8,000 and barely halfway through the year.”

Although cattle ranchers, illegal hunters and property developers have encroached on its rich habitat, the Paraná delta still teems with diverse wildlife, all facing a dire challenge to their survival.

Liotta says it breaks his heart to imagine the scale of destruction. “I can’t help thinking about the animals when I see the fires. If we humans are suffering so much, can you imagine what it must be like for the creatures being burned alive?”

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ArcticMelt2

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Re: Wildfires
« Reply #1257 on: July 30, 2020, 10:47:08 PM »
https://twitter.com/WMO/status/1288841847708803073

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July 2020 has witnessed escalation in #ArcticFires previously unseen in #CopernicusAtmosphere Monitoring Service Global Fire Assimilation System data.

July total estimated #wildfire CO2 emissions have totally smashed the record set in 2019, says @m_parrington




Niall Dollard

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Re: Wildfires
« Reply #1258 on: August 01, 2020, 01:20:51 PM »
Lots ongoing in the Sakha Republic, Russia

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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Wildfires
« Reply #1259 on: August 02, 2020, 11:40:45 AM »
Rapid spread of California wildfires prompts evacuations
https://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/510132-rapid-spread-of-california-wildfires-prompt-evacuations
Quote
A wildfire in Southern California that began Friday evening amid blazing temperatures spread across 1,900 acres and prompted evacuations.

Officials confirmed in a tweet Saturday morning that the flames were zero percent contained. The Riverside County Fire Department responded with air and ground resources, and at least 375 firefighters were assigned to the blaze, dubbed the Apple Fire.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

kassy

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Re: Wildfires
« Reply #1260 on: August 02, 2020, 08:06:47 PM »
Amazon region: Brazil records big increase in fires

Official figures from Brazil have shown a big increase in the number of fires in the Amazon region in July compared with the same month last year.

Satellite images compiled by Brazil's National Space Agency revealed there were 6,803 - a rise of 28%.

...

The latest figures raise concerns about a repeat of the huge wildfires that shocked the world in August and September last year.

"It's a terrible sign," Ane Alencar, science director at Brazil's Amazon Environmental Research Institute, was quoted as saying by Reuters news agency.

"We can expect that August will already be a difficult month and September will be worse yet."

...

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-53626544

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