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gerontocrat

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #150 on: November 15, 2019, 01:03:28 PM »
There is a neat game you can play with neural networks. The term of art is "Generative Adversarial Network."

But, in fact, the Holy grail is to teach the AI social values and why we classify something as objectionable and then it will make informed decisions for itself.

But that is an entirely different order of magnitude in AI.
Your social values are not entirely the same as mine, or those of sigmetnow, or of sidd, or of vox_mundi, or of Archimid, or of nanning, or of Trump, or of Putin, or of Bolsonaro, or of Xi Jing ......

So who decides what are the "correct" social values? And then AI algorithms are known to build into themselves unconscious bias.

Here is a link to an article on bias in security systems. I reckon the same could apply to all AI systems.

It's a bit scary

https://www.fastcompany.com/90429474/ai-is-changing-cybersecurity-but-when-its-biased-its-dangerous
AI is changing cybersecurity—but when it’s biased, it’s dangerous
Faulty algorithms, skewed data, and spotty collaboration can put your company’s security measures at risk.
Quote
Biases exist everywhere. But it’s not easy to detect them in the domain of technology, which boils down to ones and zeroes. ...

We’ve seen inappropriate and unintended bias emerge from various industries’ use of AI, including  recruiting and mortgage lending. In those cases, flawed outcomes were evident as bias was reflected in ways that relate to distinct features of our identity: gender, race, age. But I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about areas in which we don’t even realize AI bias is present. In a complex field like cybersecurity, how do we recognize biased outcomes?

AI has become a prime security tool, with research indicating  that 69% of IT executives saying they can’t respond to threats without AI. However, whether used to improve defenses or offload security tasks, it’s essential that we trust that the outcome the AI is giving us is not biased. In security, AI bias is a form of risk—the more information, context, and expertise you feed your AI, the more you’re able to manage security risks and blind spots. Otherwise, various types of bias, from racial and cultural prejudices to contextual, industry-related forms of bias, can impact the AI. In order to be effective, AI models must be diverse. So how do we ensure this breadth, and what can go wrong if we don’t?

Here are the three areas I believe are integral to help prevent AI bias from harming security efforts.

THE PROBLEM-SOLVING ALGORITHM
When AI models are based on false security assumptions or unconscious biases, they do more than threaten a company’s security posture. They can also cause significant business impact. AI that is tuned to qualify benign or malicious network traffic based on non-security factors can miss threats, allowing them to waltz into an organization’s network.  It can also overblock network traffic, barring what might be business-critical communications.

As an example, imagine that an AI developer views one region of the world as safe, because it’s an ally nation, and another as malicious, because it’s an authoritarian regime. The developer therefore allows all the network traffic from the former to enter, while blocking all traffic from the latter. This type of aggregate bias can cause AI to overlook other security contexts that might be more important.

If computer scientists design AI algorithms without influence and input from security experts, the outcomes will be flawed. Because if the AI scientists aren’t working in lockstep with security teams to cull data, threat intelligence, and context, and then codify these insights, they may tune AI tools with some level of bias. As a result, mistrained AI-powered security systems may fail to identify something that should be identified as a fraud element, a vulnerability, or a breach. Biased rules within algorithms inevitably generate biased outcomes.

THE SOURCE DATA
Data itself can create bias when the source materials aren’t diverse. AI that’s fed biased data is going to understand only a partial view of the world and make decisions based on that narrow understanding. In cybersecurity, that means threats will be overlooked. For instance, if a spam classifier wasn’t trained on a representative set of benign emails, such as emails in various languages or with linguistic idiosyncrasies like slang, it will inevitably produce false positives. Even common, intentional misuse of grammar, spelling, or syntax can prompt a spam classifier to block benign text.

THE SECURITY INFLUENCERS
AI models can suffer from tunnel vision, too. As a cyber threat’s behavioral pattern varies based on factors like geography or business size, it’s important to train AI on the various environments that a threat operates in and the various forms it takes on. For instance, in a financial services environment, if you build AI to only detect identity-based issues, it won’t recognize malicious elements outside that setting. Lacking broad coverage, this Al model would be unable to identify threats outside the niche threat pattern it was taught.

IF COMPUTER SCIENTISTS DESIGN AI ALGORITHMS WITHOUT INPUT FROM SECURITY EXPERTS, THE OUTCOMES WILL BE FLAWED.”

But when a security team consists of professionals from various backgrounds, cultures, and geographies, with varying expertise, it can help AI developers feed a 360-degree perspective on many behavioral patterns of security threats into the AI to process. We must train systems against a diversity of problem statements to enable a range of scenarios to be represented in the AI model and, subsequently, help prevent gaps in its threat detection process.
If businesses are going to make AI an integral asset in their security arsenal, it’s essential they understand that AI that is not fair and accurate cannot be effective. One way to help prevent bias within AI is to make it cognitively diverse: The computer scientists developing it, the data feeding it, and the security teams influencing it should have multiple and diverse perspectives. Through cognitive diversity, the blind spot of one expert, one data point, or one approach can be managed by the blind spot of another, getting as close to no blind spots—and no bias—as possible.

So, to answer the questions I get from business leaders, you can only address biased outcomes that aren’t obvious if you know where to look. And in security, you have to look at the elements producing the outcome. That is where you monitor for bias—and that is where you correct it.

Aarti Borkar is a VP at IBM Security, where she is responsible for the vision, strategy, and execution for the business and builds ethical AI and bias-mitigation tools.


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NeilT

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #151 on: November 15, 2019, 01:18:29 PM »

Your social values are not entirely the same as mine, or those of sigmetnow, or of sidd, or of vox_mundi, or of Archimid, or of nanning, or of Trump, or of Putin, or of Bolsonaro, or of Xi Jing ......

So who decides what are the "correct" social values? And then AI algorithms are known to build into themselves unconscious bias.

Equally who decides what is objectionable?

Whilst we all have slightly differing social values, our core tenets on what is acceptable and what is not correlate to about 95%.  It really is on the fringes that we differ.

Crime, violence, abuse, we are all pretty much aligned.  When it gets to the finer details the borders are blurred.
Being right too soon is socially unacceptable.

Robert A. Heinlein

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #152 on: November 15, 2019, 02:03:18 PM »
^
This is what Asimov was aiming for with his Three Laws. Later, Asimov added a fourth, or zeroth law, that preceded the others in terms of priority:
  • 0. A robot may not harm humanity, or, by inaction, allow humanity to come to harm.
Other additional laws: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Laws_of_Robotics#Additional_laws

Unfortunately, these laws have ambiguities and loopholes

... "The point of the Three Laws was to fail in interesting ways; that's what made most of the stories involving them interesting," ... "So the Three Laws were instructive in terms of teaching us how any attempt to legislate ethics in terms of specific rules is bound to fall apart and have various loopholes."

... "The future societies Asimov was depicting were explicitly substrate chauvinist; they gave humans more rights than humanoid robots. The Three Laws were intended to enforce and maintain that kind of social order." see also slavery.

... The most important reason for Asimov’s Laws not being applied yet is how robots are being used in our real world. You don’t arm a Reaper drone with a Hellfire missile or put a machine gun on a MAARS (Modular Advanced Armed Robotic System) not to cause humans to come to harm. That is the very point!

Killing people is a feature; not a bug!

... The point here is that much of the funding for robotic research comes from the military, which is paying for robots that follow the very opposite of Asimov’s laws. It explicitly wants robots that can kill, won’t take orders from just any human, and don’t care about their own existences.


... "The main issue I expect to be important for humanity is not the moral regulation of a large number of semi-smart humanoid robots, but the eventual development of advanced forms of artificial intelligence (whether embodied or not) that function at far greater than human levels"

And if we're trying to tinker with the ethics of a superpowerful AI, it could eventually come down to the question: Why would a god be allowed to let bad things happen to good people?

See also:
Why Asimov's Three Laws Of Robotics Can't Protect Us
https://io9.gizmodo.com/why-asimovs-three-laws-of-robotics-cant-protect-us-1553665410/amp

Isaac Asimov’s Laws of Robotics Are Wrong
https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/isaac-asimovs-laws-of-robotics-are-wrong/amp/
« Last Edit: November 15, 2019, 02:10:59 PM by vox_mundi »
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #153 on: November 15, 2019, 07:09:32 PM »
...
Crime, violence, abuse, we are all pretty much aligned.  ...
Well, on "their" violence you and I may be pretty much aligned, but on "my" abuse, I'm much more lenient, and on your crime, you are much more lenient.

How many people decry lawlessness in others while intentionally driving over the speed limit?  (Yes, some people are a little less hypocritical than others.)  Isn't "homo sapiens" just Latin for "hypocritical saps"?

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gerontocrat

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #154 on: November 15, 2019, 08:14:51 PM »

Your social values are not entirely the same as mine, or those of sigmetnow, or of sidd, or of vox_mundi, or of Archimid, or of nanning, or of Trump, or of Putin, or of Bolsonaro, or of Xi Jing ......

So who decides what are the "correct" social values? And then AI algorithms are known to build into themselves unconscious bias.

Equally who decides what is objectionable?

Whilst we all have slightly differing social values, our core tenets on what is acceptable and what is not correlate to about 95%.  It really is on the fringes that we differ.

Crime, violence, abuse, we are all pretty much aligned.  When it gets to the finer details the borders are blurred.
The London Metropolitan Police & Extinction Rebellion have very different views on values, as did Gandhi & the British Colonial Administration.

Morrison, PM of Australia is considering introducing laws that severely restrict the right of protest.

The Communist party of the PRoC has somewhat different social values tha an awful lot of Hong Kong residents.

These differences are not marginal, not on the fringe. There have been incidences when even MI6 has been accused, e.g. of flagging protesters against fracking as security risks.

It is a can of worms, a bottle with an evil genies inside. And nowt we say will stop those who presume to govern us from using AI in the cause of their "principles", which I am sure differ substantially from mine.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

nanning

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #155 on: November 15, 2019, 08:50:55 PM »
<snip>
Your social values are not entirely the same as mine, or those of sigmetnow, or of sidd, or of vox_mundi, or of Archimid, or of nanning, or of Trump, or of Putin, or of Bolsonaro, or of Xi Jing ......

So who decides what are the "correct" social values?

If you want your culture to go in a positive direction (equality, nice to nature, welcoming, honest etc.), to go towards a more natural system (humans behaving like their 'design'), you need a high morality culture.

Social values need to reflect this.
To some extent there is a calibration possible of what is good and bad, of what is high and low morality. To optimize human organisation in symbiosis with living nature.

SO: Some social values are better than others. I think I can decide in general which ones are "correct" and which are not, based on my understanding of morality. It's all good :)
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
   Simple: minimize your possessions and be free and kind    It's just a mindset.       Refugees welcome

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #156 on: November 15, 2019, 08:59:51 PM »
It'll be nice to program the car I'm in to go the speed limit, and then leave the driving to AI.
Then I only have to deal with my exploitation of resources funded by past exploitation accumulations.
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NeilT

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #157 on: November 16, 2019, 05:35:07 PM »
It'll be nice to program the car I'm in to go the speed limit, and then leave the driving to AI.
Then I only have to deal with my exploitation of resources funded by past exploitation accumulations.

Even nicer is that when the speed limit changes, just because you crossed a border, the car will notice for you.

I drove from Raleigh to DC and back in a day and it took a bit of focus to ensure that every time a border was crossed, with a limit change, that it was noticed and adhered to.  Especially on the way back.
Being right too soon is socially unacceptable.

Robert A. Heinlein

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #158 on: November 16, 2019, 06:11:50 PM »


Interactive robot: We present a system for fast and robust handovers with a robot, together with a user study investigating the effect of robot speed and reaction time on perceived interaction quality. The system can match and exceed human speeds and confirms that users prefer human-level timing.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/robotics-hardware/video-friday-mit-mini-cheetah-robots



Autonomous charging of autonomous vehicles. (... no more gas jockeys)
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

TerryM

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #159 on: November 16, 2019, 09:40:59 PM »

Autonomous charging of autonomous vehicles. (... no more gas jockeys)


Zounds!!


All of those clean cut young men that wipe our windows, check the air in our tires & fill her up with Ethyl will be left without employment. No doubt they'll soon be joining youth gangs with fellow unemployed delinquents, loitering in pool halls, and will be harassing all of the decent young girls in our community.


We need a meeting at the high school to address these disturbing times!
Terry - from 1965 ;D

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #160 on: November 16, 2019, 10:12:22 PM »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #161 on: November 20, 2019, 01:57:54 AM »
Cerebras Unveils First Installation of Its AI Supercomputer at Argonne National Labs
https://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/computing/hardware/cerebras-unveils-ai-supercomputer-argonne-national-lab-first-installation

At Supercomputing 2019 in Denver, Colo., Cerebras Systems unveiled the computer powered by the world’s biggest chip. Cerebras says the computer, the CS-1, has the equivalent machine learning capabilities of hundreds of racks worth of GPU-based computers consuming hundreds of kilowatts, but it takes up only one-third of a standard rack and consumes about 17 kW. Argonne National Labs, future home of what’s expected to be the United States’ first exascale supercomputer, says it has already deployed a CS-1. Argonne is one of two announced U.S. National Laboratories customers for Cerebras, the other being Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

The pioneering Wafer-Scale Engine (WSE) – the largest chip ever built – is at the heart of our deep learning system, the Cerebras CS-1.

56x larger than any other chip, the WSE delivers more compute, more memory, and more communication bandwidth. This enables AI research at previously-impossible speeds and scale.

The system “is the fastest AI computer,” says CEO and cofounder Andrew Feldman. He compared it with Google's TPU clusters (the 2nd of three generations of that company’s AI computers), noting that one of those “takes 10 racks and over 100 kilowatts to deliver a third of the performance of a single [CS-1] box.”

The CS-1 is designed to speed the training of novel and large neural networks, a process that can take weeks or longer. Powered by a 400,000-core, 1-trillion-transistor wafer-scale processor chip, the CS-1 should collapse that task to minutes or even seconds. ... Cerebras has linked as many as 32 CS-1s together to get a roughly 32-fold performance increase.



  • 46,225 mm2 chip - 56x larger than the biggest GPU ever made
  • 400,000 core - 78x more cores
  • 18 GB on-chip SRAM - 3000x more on-chip memory
  • 100 Pb/s interconnect - 33,000x more bandwidth
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #162 on: November 20, 2019, 02:01:16 AM »
AI helps discover new geoglyph in the Nazca Lines
https://www.theverge.com/platform/amp/2019/11/19/20970578/nazca-lines-ai-machine-learning-143-new-geoglyphs-ibm-japan-yamagata-university

Scientists from Japan have used machine learning for the first time to identify a new figure among the ancient motifs of Peru’s Nazca Lines.

The illustration, known as a geoglyph, is thought to date to between 100 BC and 500 AD, and was made by removing the dark stones of the Nazca Desert to reveal the white sand beneath. It’s small, just five meters in height, and it shows a humanoid figure grasping a cane or club. Like the other drawings in the Nazca Desert, its exact function is unknown, but its discovery next to an ancient path suggests it might have been used as a waypoint.

“It is in an area that we often investigated, but we did not know the geoglyph existed,” Professor Makato Sakai, the leader of a team from Yamagata University that conducted the research, told The Verge over email. “It’s a large achievement.”

It’s the first design in the Nazca Lines to be discovered with the help of artificial intelligence.



https://www.yamagata-u.ac.jp/en/information/info/20191115_01/
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Archimid

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #163 on: November 20, 2019, 02:07:23 AM »
Quote
56x larger than any other chip, the WSE delivers more compute, more memory, and more communication bandwidth. This enables AI research at previously-impossible speeds and scale

wow.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

TerryM

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #164 on: November 20, 2019, 09:16:23 AM »
If hardware speed & capacity are what's been holding up the development of AI, then perhaps we should be rushing to work out the ethical conundrums that rolling out AI will entail.
Asimov's solutions have been thrown out the window, but nothing has been offered in their place.
 
I think I'd prefer a world with no AI to a world with AI and no regulations restricting its use. In the hands of government, Big Business, or the very wealthy AI will have a profound effect on the lives of everyone. Especially at risk will be those who can't afford the services of AI units of their own.


Where are those damn Luddite Saboteurs when we need them?
Terry

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #165 on: November 20, 2019, 02:09:04 PM »
"Where are the Luddites today?", you ask.
Quote
Contemporary neo-Luddites are a widely diverse group of loosely affiliated or non-affiliated groups which includes "writers, academics, students, families, Amish, Mennonites, Quakers, environmentalists, "fallen-away yuppies," "ageing flower children" and "young idealists seeking a technology-free environment."
All I had to do was do an internet search on "luddite quaker"  :D

I once heard a Quaker's presentation on who joined (and therefore influenced) the Quaker movement in the days of yore.  Apparently, isolated Luddites (this is in England during the 18th & 19th centuries) often joined Quaker meetings, even though (historically) Quakers never took on basic Luddite concerns as their own (to the World's detriment).
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TerryM

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #166 on: November 20, 2019, 04:04:42 PM »
^^
I'm actually surrounded here by Mennonites & Amish!


Perhaps salvation can be found simply by following some of the buggies to a meeting house?


They haven't been very quick at adapting to the latest technological trends now that you mention it. Perhaps an aging bank barn will become our last best chance at avoiding high tech surveillance.  8)


The glasses are to thwart iris identification cameras.
Terry

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #167 on: November 21, 2019, 05:13:57 PM »
Break out the pitchforks and torches ...



--------------------------------------

Army Autonomy & AI Symposium
https://meetings.ausa.org/autonomy/agenda.cfm


--------------------------------------

The Army’s Got A Universal Robot Driver
https://breakingdefense.com/2019/11/the-armys-universal-robot-driver/

The US Army is field-testing a robot brain so versatile it can drive both tanks and trucks — even British Army lorries with the steering wheel on the wrong side.



While the private sector struggles to perfect self-driving cars that can operate safely on well-mapped and well-maintained roads, the Army’s Ground Vehicle Systems Center here has developed a standard set of software and sensors that can turn both wheeled and tracked vehicles into off-road robots.

“Our best day is their worst day,” said Bernard Theisen, a senior GVSC engineer, “because we’re going to go in assuming no comms, potentially no GPS, and the terrain that was there yesterday may not be there today.” A dirt road may be washed out by flooding in a disaster relief operation, for example, or cratered by roadside bombs in a war zone. And that’s assuming there ever was a road to where you need to go, never a safe assumption in the Army.

“Right now, we’re not giving the systems a lot of a priori data. Basically we’re letting them figure out their environments on their own, because…. we assume we might not have GPS,” Theisen said. “We could drop a robot in the middle of nowhere with no information [and it would] start building the map.” ... The software GVSC has developed includes an exploration mode where the vehicle starts with no map data at all and slowly, cautiously explores the area and builds its own map – without a human being involved. This mode isn’t enabled on all vehicles, but it’s shown promise in experiments.

Faced with an obstacle blocking their path, the robots know how to back up and try another way around. If they get truly stuck – which happens — they can call a human to take over by remote control. And if they’ve lost their link to a human controller, depending on how much freedom you give the software, they can proceed on their mission or return to the last location it had a connection.

The GVSC has even done experiments where one unmanned vehicle explores the area and shares its map data with others, he said, although that’s still very early research. But there’s long term potential to (for example) let loose a swarm of expendable scout robots in an urban area to carefully map the roads, alleys, even interiors and underground tunnels, before human troops have to enter these potential ambush zones.

... So what can the Army make self-driving with this tech? Pretty much anything with wheels or tracks, it turns out, from the ubiquitous Humvee, to cargo handlers like forklifts, to the British Army’s German-made HX60 trucks, to the venerable M113, a Vietnam-era tracked armored transport now being used as an experimental surrogate for a future Robotic Combat System. (Human controllers follow the M113s in modified M2 Bradleys). All told, Theisen said, the GSCV has installed versions of its autonomy software and sensors on over 20 different types of vehicles.

The Army is already fielding supply trucks with leader-follower capability to operational units. Recently, 30 modified PLS trucks were issued to a transport unit at Fort Polk, La. A second unit at Fort Sill, Okla. will start getting its 30 trucks in January. Oshkosh and Robotic Research told me they could take the humans out altogether, if the Army wanted. They expect to ramp up to fully unmanned operations by the end of 2020.

https://breakingdefense.com/2018/08/army-wants-70-self-driving-supply-trucks-by-2020/



----------------------------------------------

Army Robots Go Rolling Along – Ahead Of Schedule
https://breakingdefense.com/2019/10/army-robots-go-rolling-along-ahead-of-schedule/

Commercial research into self-driving cars is spinning off lots of useful advances in software and sensors that the military can use, Coffman said

Brig. Gen. Richard Ross Coffman, director of the Next Generation Combat Vehicle Cross Functional Team, said, he was impressed by the levels of autonomy – much of it derived from civilian work on self-driving cars – and of modularity – that is, the ability to swap different sensors, weapons, and other systems to tailor the robots for different Army missions. Overall, the robots are about two years more sophisticated than expected, he said. Capabilities the service expected in 2023 are now potentially achievable in 2021.

Quote
... “I witnessed four robots execute a maneuver, establish a screen line, call for [artillery] fire, and then attack, with direct fire, an opposing force  – all while the control vehicles were under defilade and undetectable by the enemy.”

  • 2020 – Phase I: Starting in March, a platoon of four unmanned M113s, remote-controlled by soldiers in modified M2 Bradley vehicles called MET-Ds (as seen in the Army video above), will go through a month of field tests at Fort Carson.
  • 2021 – Phase II: Army soldiers – still using the modified Bradleys as control vehicles — will start testing new robots from industry. There’ll be a mix of four prototype RCV-Light unmanned vehicles, weighing 10 tons or less and capable of carrying infantry weapons like machineguns or Javelin anti-tank missiles, and four RCV-Medium ’bots, weighing up to 12 tons and capable of mounting, say, a 30 mm chaingun. Combined with six of the modified M113s, that will form a full company of robots, allowing trials of much more complex tactics.
  • 2023 – Phase III: Soldiers will test an upgraded company of robots, including the first four RCV-Heavy vehicles. These will be, effectively, unmanned light tanks weighing roughly 20 tons that could potentially carry a 120-mm cannon. Now, even the “heavy” robot is nowhere near as heavy as a massively armored M1 Abrams tank, which weighs 60 to 70 tons. But Coffman argues they don’t have to be, because they don’t have humans inside them to protect.

... “I think we can do NBC reconnaissance today,” Coffman told me. “I think we can do aspects of a combined arms breach, as they just demonstrated a few months ago out at Yakima. And I think we can deliver sensors, both day and night sensors, to detect enemy forces. We could execute a lethality option” – that is, robots armed with weapons that they may be able to aim autonomously, but which only fire on human command.

“All of those capabilities are available today,” ... “It’s at what range and at what cognitive burden to the controllers.” ... “I would like to get one controller to 12 robots,” Coffman said, “and we are a long way off from that – again, 2035 or beyond.” (... but probably earlier)

Quote
... “Anywhere that a soldier is at the highest risk on the battlefield, and we can replace him or her with a robot, that’s what we want to do”

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Sigmetnow

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #168 on: November 21, 2019, 05:55:08 PM »
Quote
Faced with an obstacle blocking their path, the robots know how to back up and try another way around. If they get truly stuck – which happens — they can call a human to take over by remote control. And if they’ve lost their link to a human controller, depending on how much freedom you give the software, they can proceed on their mission or return to the last location it had a connection.

When an obstacle course was placed in front of a Tesla Model 3 and the Summon feature was engaged, it said, “The hell with that!” and drove around it!  ;D
When told to navigate to a point that was in a river, the car drove along, looking for a proper route, and finally said, “Not happening.”

(My anthropomorphisms. ;) )

Tesla Model 3 owner puts Smart Summon through intense obstacle course
https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-model-3-smart-summon-obstacle-test-video/
Article and video.
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #169 on: November 21, 2019, 06:34:09 PM »
vox_mundi, it looks like Keith Laumer knew what he was writing about:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolo_universe
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #170 on: November 21, 2019, 07:12:01 PM »

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/7e/0f/1c/7e0f1c323d6ebd17135090d86e1ac402.jpg

It Is Easier to Tear Down Than To Build
Quote
...  if all things should perish as slowly as they come into being; but as it is, increases are of sluggish growth, but the way to ruin is rapid

- Lucius Anneaus Seneca, Letters to Lucilius, n. 91

-------------------------------------------

IBM Computer Stars in Cambridge Debate on the Dangers of AI
https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/21/tech/ai-cambridge-university-debate/index.html

IBM's fast-talking AI machine faces a huge new test: It's taking part in a Cambridge University debate on the merits of the emerging technology that will feature some of the world's best human minds.

Project Debater, as the IBM machine is known, will participate Thursday in a debate at the Cambridge Union featuring both computers and humans. At issue is whether AI will bring more harm than good to the world.

The Cambridge Union has been been hosting debates for more than two centuries, but this is the first contest to feature AI, said society president Rachel Tustin.

The IBM machine, which was defeated by a human in a one-on-one debate nine months ago, will deliver each team's 4-minute opening speech using submissions sourced ahead of time from over 1,000 people.

The rebuttals by each side will be done by the human debaters, who will also deliver the closing arguments. A winner will be named based on which team persuades more audience members to its view.

The event will test Project Debater's ability to work out whether submissions are for or against the motion, and assess which arguments are of better quality. It will also provide insight into whether the technology is able to detect redundancies, given that people will have made the same arguments using different words, said IBM engineer Noam Slonim.

... In the previous debate held in San Francisco in February, Project Debater failed to deliver convincing rebuttals in a debate about whether preschool should be subsidized.
Its arguments appeared out of order. For example, it saved its best counter punches for its closing statement. At that debate, Project Debater was given 15 minutes to process 400 million documents.

----------------------------------------

New AI System Predicts Seizures With Near-Perfect Accuracy
https://spectrum.ieee.org/the-human-os/biomedical/diagnostics/this-new-ai-system-can-predict-seizures-with-nearperfect-accuracy

Two researchers at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette have developed a new AI-powered model that can predict the occurrence of seizures up to one hour before onset with 99.6 percent accuracy.

Detecting seizures ahead of time could greatly improve the quality of life for patients with epilepsy and provide them with enough time to take action, he says. Notably, seizures are controllable with medication in up to 70 percent of these patients.

The researchers developed and tested their approach using long-term EEG data from 22 patients at the Boston Children’s Hospital. Although this is a small sample size, the results proved exciting for the team. Not only is their model very accurate, at 99.6 percent, but it also has a low tendency for false positives, at 0.004 false alarms per hour.

Efficient Epileptic Seizure Prediction Based on Deep Learning

-----------------------------------

Are Hiring Algorithms Fair? They're Too Opaque To Tell, Study Finds
https://techxplore.com/news/2019-11-hiring-algorithms-fair-theyre-opaque.html

New research from a team of Computing and Information Science scholars at Cornell University raises questions about hiring algorithms and the tech companies who develop and use them: How unbiased is the automated screening process? How are the algorithms built? And by whom, toward what end, and with what data?

They found companies tend to favor obscurity over transparency in this emerging field, where lack of consensus on fundamental points—formal definitions of "bias" and "fairness," for starters—have enabled tech companies to define and address algorithmic bias on their own terms.

The researchers scoured available public information to begin to understand these tools and what measures, if any, companies have in place to evaluate and mitigate algorithmic bias. Shielded by intellectual property laws, tech companies don't have to disclose any information about their algorithmic models for pre-employment screenings—though some companies did choose to offer insight.

Very few vendors offer concrete information about how they validate their assessments or disclose specifics on how they mitigate algorithmic bias, researchers found.

"Plenty of vendors make no mention of efforts to combat bias, which is particularly worrying since either they're not thinking about it at all, or they're not being transparent about their practices," Raghavan said.

Even if they use such terms as "bias" and "fairness," these can be vague. A vendor can claim its assessment algorithm is "fair" without revealing how the company defines fairness.

It's like "free-range" eggs, Raghavan said: There is a set of conditions under which eggs can be labeled free range, but our intuitive notion of free range may not line up with those conditions.

Mitigating Bias in Algorithmic Hiring: Evaluating Claims and Practices

------------------------------------

Rise of the Bots: Research Team Completes First Census of Wikipedia Bots
https://techxplore.com/news/2019-11-bots-team-census-wikipedia.html

Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology, in Hoboken, N.J., have now completed the first analysis of all 1,601 of Wikipedia's bots, using computer algorithms to classify them by function and shed light on the ways that machine intelligences and human users work together to improve and expand the world's largest digital encyclopedia.

... In total, bots play nine core roles on Wikipedia, accounting for about 10 percent of all activity on the site, and up to 88 percent of activity on some sub-sections such as the site's Wikidata platform. Most of that activity comes from more than 1,200 fixer-bots, which have collectively made more than 80 million edits to the site. Advisor-bots and protector-bots, by contrast, are less prolific, but play a vital role in shaping human editors' interactions with Wikipedia.

"People don't mind being criticized by bots, as long as they're polite about it," ... "Wikipedia's transparency and feedback mechanisms help people to accept bots as legitimate members of the community."

... One thing is clear: Wikipedia's bots, and the governance and feedback systems that have sprung up around them, offer lessons for commercial bot-builders. "The things we're seeing on Wikipedia could be a harbinger of things to come in many different industries and professions,"

---------------------------------------

Sony launches new AI unit for creation of robotic kitchen
https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/11/sony-launches-ai-unit-creation-robotic-kitchen-191120141006908.html

Japanese electronics giant aims to change the ways we cook and eat, bringing AI and robotics to chefs' aid.

Japanese electronics giant Sony launched a new artificial intelligence unit it hopes will change the way we cook and eat.

The new research arm, Sony AI, will operate in Japan, Europe and the United States and will also focus on the traditional areas of gaming, imaging and sensor equipment, as well as "gastronomy".

The firm that produced the PlayStation franchise and the Spider-man movie series is the latest multinational tech company wanting a piece of the pie in the food business, where data is increasingly driving new dishes to pique the palate.

"AI and robotics will not replace chefs. We are aiming to offer new tools to expand their creativity with AI and robotics," Sony spokesman Shinichi Tobe said on Wednesday.

"The field of food requires a study of molecular structures. By using AI and its analytical capacity we can create new things," Tobe said.



------------------------------------------

Deutsche Bank Says Robots are Already Replacing Workers as it Ramps Up a Plan to Axe 18,000 Jobs
https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/deutsche-bank-replacing-18000-jobs-with-ai-machine-learning-fn-report-2019-11-1028696144

  • Deutsche Bank is using robots to replace some of the 18,000 staff it cut earlier this year.
  • Financial News spoke to the bank's head of operations for Deutsche's corporate and investment bank, who said that using AI "massively increased productivity" in certain sectors of the business.
  • So far "680,000 hours of manual work" has already been saved, he said.
  • In July, Deutsche Bank announced a massive restructuring, axing thousands of jobs, and dissolving its equities sales and trading unit.
  • The bank has axed over 4,000 jobs since last year, and about 1,000 since July.

... The London-based news organization said that Deutsche is pushing to "automate large parts of its back-office" via a new strategy called "Operations 4.0," as part of its $6.6 billion savings initiative over the next three years.

Matthews told FN that the machine learning tools helped to save "680,000 hours of manual work" and that it "so far used bots to process 5 million transactions in its corporate bank and perform 3.4 million checks within its investment bank."
« Last Edit: November 21, 2019, 07:44:06 PM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

TerryM

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #171 on: November 22, 2019, 10:19:55 AM »
Thanks Vox, I'll certainly sleep more soundly knowing that our robots are standing on guard over us. I just want to make sure that the robot chefs are never exposed to Soilent Green.
Terry :'(

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #172 on: November 22, 2019, 08:23:27 PM »
Here’s an A.I. Preview of What Climate Change Will Do To Your Neighborhood
https://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/how-ai-can-address-climate-crisis/

Climate change denialism persists despite the overwhelming scientific consensus that it’s real, and even those who recognize the reality often seem caught in the mental trap of thinking that the most serious impacts will be felt some place far away.

To remedy this, a team of researchers at the Mila Quebec Artificial Intelligence Institute wants to bring the not-so-distant climate crisis reality closer to home. They’re creating an A.I.-powered platform that shows users how climate change-related natural disasters may impact their homes. The goal is to develop more intimate understandings of how climate change will upend communities, while empowering people to make more informed decisions about whether they fuel or fight the impending crisis.

“It’s hard for people to relate to climate change when we only mention remote areas and polar bears,” said Victor Schmidt, a PhD Candidate at Mila and lead author of a paper from May that outlined the team’s approach.

Quote
... "Showing people the potential consequences of climate change in their neighborhoods is a good way of making climate change more personal and less distant.”

Mila’s Visualizing Climate Change platform is designed to show people what the future has in store if we don’t significantly cut emissions soon. Similar to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Sea Level Rise Viewer, which offers an aerial perspective on the how far the ocean will creep up or shores, Visualizing Climate Change will let users input street addresses and see what things will look like in the aftermath of a natural disaster. The platform will focus on flooding to begin with, before tackling more difficult to depict, climate-change related events, such as wildfires.

  • The Mila team uses an image-to-image translation algorithm to transform photos captured from Google Street View into ones depicting the aftermath of flooding. They use a generative adversarial network (GAN) to train the system. GANs work by pitting two algorithms against each other—one algorithm generates an image and the other tries to guess whether that image is real or fake. In this way, the first algorithm creates more realistic images as the second challenges it to perform better.

=

Schmidt and his colleagues don’t claim to be climate scientists and their platform is not meant to be scientifically precise. Rather, they see their role as communicators, helping people interpret the predictions of the latest climate science. And the Mila team want to provide more than just a wake-up call. They hope to integrate resources to guide users on ways to address the climate issue.

Victor Schmidt, et.al. Visualizing the Consequences of Climate Change Using Cycle-Consistent Adversarial Networks, https://arxiv.org/abs/1905.03709 (2019)

---------------------------------------

AI Poses Greater Threat to College Grads Than People Without Degrees
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/ai-poses-greater-threat-to-college-grads-than-those-without-a-degree/

  • College-educated workers are more vulnerable to being replaced by artificial intelligence than those with only a high school degree, a new Brookings Institution study finds.
  • Men, workers between 25 to 54, and white and Asian workers are also more exposed to encroachment by AI than other groups.
  • Women tend to work in jobs that require heavy interpersonal skills, like teaching and health care, which makes them less vulnerable.

Back In 2000, Goldman Sachs employed 600 people to execute stock trades for the investment bank's major clients. By 2017, that workforce had reportedly dwindled to just two traders — the others had been replaced by automated trading systems that can handle millions of transactions per minute.

The research "suggests that better-educated, better-paid workers (along with manufacturing and production workers) will be the most affected by the new AI technologies, with some exceptions," write Mark Muro, Jacob Whiton and Robert Maxim of Brookings.

Brookings relied on a novel approach to assess which jobs could be hurt by AI. The think tank matched job and AI patent descriptions, matching terms such as "monitoring operating conditions" to find overlaps. From there, the researchers determined which occupations have the most exposure to the technology.

Instead of high school grads being most vulnerable, it's the highly educated who have the most at stake, according to Brookings. Workers with graduate degrees are almost four times as exposed to AI as those with just high school diplomas, and those with bachelor's degree are more than five times as exposed, they found.



------------------------------------

Google's Parent Company Alphabet is Getting Back Into Robots, But This Time It's Using AI to Create Robots That Can Learn On Their Own
https://www.businessinsider.com/google-x-consumer-robot-project-2019-11

  • Alphabet's X group, the R&D lab formerly known as Google X, introduced the Everyday Robot Project on Thursday.
  • The project comes out of Alphabet's string of robotics acquisitions several years ago, which had been put on hold.
  • The new project is focused on building robots capable of useful, everyday tasks, like sorting recycling.
  • Alphabet's X group said it will focus on AI-enabled robots that can be learn tasks on their own, rather than being programmed to do specific things.

The goal is new breed of robot infused with artificial intelligence that can be "taught" how do to something, rather than needing to be programmed by humans ahead of time to perform a chore.

"It's possible for robots to learn how to perform new tasks in the real world just through practice, rather than having engineers 'hand code' every new task, exception, or improvement," Hans Peter Brondmo,  Alphabet X's "Chief Robot Whisperer", wrote in a blog post announcing the news Thursday.

... The robots can learn by observing human demonstrations and by "shared experiences," the company said.

This project could eventually be in direct competition with Amazon's consumer robot. The company is reportedly working on a robot codenamed "Vesta" that would act as a mobile version of the Alexa voice assistant.



------------------------------------

SecArmy’s Multi-Domain Kill Chain: Space-Cloud-AI
https://breakingdefense.com/2019/11/secarmys-multi-domain-kill-chain-space-to-cloud-to-ai/

Top Army leaders want Low Earth Orbit satellites, cloud computing, and artificial intelligence to find targets for future long-range weapons.

Army leaders are making the case this week for three key technologies they want to combine into the foundation for future multi-domain warfare against Russia or China. Satellites will spot the targets, cloud computing will share the targeting data, and AI will make sense of it. ...

-----------------------------------------

« Last Edit: November 23, 2019, 01:02:04 AM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

TerryM

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #173 on: November 23, 2019, 10:40:45 AM »
1st Law of Robotics
A robot may not injure a human being, or through inaction allow a human being to come to harm.
..........................

This was the 1st rule that Isaac Asimov, a very bright author of popular fiction and a secular Jew formulated as he wrote from the safety of New York City. Influenced undoubtedly by news and propaganda at the height of WWII in 1942.

The "law" he proposed, and the subsequent two that followed from, and expanded on the 1st law were accepted as the minimum constraints necessary by at least a generation of Sci-Fi Fans, Futurists, Engineers, Philosophers and Politicians.

In the early 2,000's, with authoritarianism and militarism rampant in America subsequent to the 9,11 event, DARPA initiated a program exploring the possibility of autonomous vehicles, ostensibly to "save lives" in times of conflict. Killer Robot development has been running amuck from that time.


Asimov's well vetted "laws" were ignored for the "greater good" of saving innocent lives, and this had been forced on the country's military by events beyond their, or the Governments control. Once Asimov's law was violated the assumption has been that the genie can never be put back in the bottle.

That assumption is untrue. It's a political question that can be solved by raising such a stink that no politician will dare to support killer robots. The life you save may be your own!

Terry


vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #174 on: November 23, 2019, 05:03:36 PM »
Quote
... In the early 2,000's, with authoritarianism and militarism rampant in America subsequent to the 9,11 event, DARPA initiated a program exploring the possibility of autonomous vehicles, ostensibly to "save lives" in times of conflict. Killer Robot development has been running amuck from that time. ...

^

It's Our Nature ...


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Scorpion_and_the_Frog

Were Other Humans the First Victims of the Sixth Mass Extinction?
https://phys.org/news/2019-11-humans-victims-sixth-mass-extinction.html

Nine human species walked the Earth 300,000 years ago. Now there is just one. The Neanderthals, Homo neanderthalensis, were stocky hunters adapted to Europe's cold steppes. The related Denisovans inhabited Asia, while the more primitive Homo erectus lived in Indonesia, and Homo rhodesiensis in central Africa.

Several short, small-brained species survived alongside them: Homo naledi in South Africa, Homo luzonensis in the Philippines, Homo floresiensis ("hobbits") in Indonesia, and the mysterious Red Deer Cave People in China. Given how quickly we're discovering new species, more are likely waiting to be found.

By 10,000 years ago, they were all gone. The disappearance of these other species resembles a mass extinction. But there's no obvious environmental catastrophe—volcanic eruptions, climate change, asteroid impact—driving it. Instead, the extinctions' timing suggests they were caused by the spread of a new species, evolving 260,000-350,000 years ago in Southern Africa: Homo sapiens. ...

-----------------------------------

Report to Congress on Artificial Intelligence and National Security
https://news.usni.org/2019/11/22/report-to-congress-on-artificial-intelligence-and-national-security

------------------------------------

AI Bot Can Beat Humans in Multiplayer Hidden-Role Games
https://techxplore.com/news/2019-11-bot-humans-multiplayer-hidden-role-games.html

MIT researchers have developed a bot equipped with artificial intelligence that can beat human players in tricky online multiplayer games where player roles and motives are kept secret.

At the Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems next month, the researchers will present DeepRole, the first gaming bot that can win online multiplayer games in which the participants' team allegiances are initially unclear. The bot is designed with novel "deductive reasoning" added into an AI algorithm commonly used for playing poker. This helps it reason about partially observable actions, to determine the probability that a given player is a teammate or opponent. In doing so, it quickly learns whom to ally with and which actions to take to ensure its team's victory.

The researchers pitted DeepRole against human players in more than 4,000 rounds of the online game "The Resistance: Avalon." In this game, players try to deduce their peers' secret roles as the game progresses, while simultaneously hiding their own roles. As both a teammate and an opponent, DeepRole consistently outperformed human players.

... DeepRole uses a game-planning algorithm called "counterfactual regret minimization" (CFR)—which learns to play a game by repeatedly playing against itself—augmented with deductive reasoning. At each point in a game, CFR looks ahead to create a decision "game tree" of lines and nodes describing the potential future actions of each player. Game trees represent all possible actions (lines) each player can take at each future decision point. In playing out potentially billions of game simulations, CFR notes which actions had increased or decreased its chances of winning, and iteratively revises its strategy to include more good decisions. Eventually, it plans an optimal strategy that, at worst, ties against any opponent.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2019, 07:22:22 PM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

nanning

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #175 on: November 23, 2019, 06:11:50 PM »
Thank you very much vox for that. It is what I have thought for some time now.
I want to put in a likely refinement: It was homo sapiens but not all of them. The conquering supremacy tribes are the main culprits, out of which civilisation has been formed.

----
Hi Terry, interesting and I agree with you.
Wasn't there an even more important 0'th law?
I'd like to offer an improvement of law 1:
A robot may not injure other lifeforms or living nature's systems, or through inaction allow another lifeform or living nature's systems to come to harm.
The 0'th law is now not necessary.

Is it feasible to programme robots without the supremacy of humans over nature?
I think not. I think it can only be destructive. There is no other way because the whole idea of modern technology is a short-term totally destructive insanity. It shows.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
   Simple: minimize your possessions and be free and kind    It's just a mindset.       Refugees welcome

SteveMDFP

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #176 on: November 23, 2019, 06:29:40 PM »
Thank you very much vox for that. It is what I have thought for some time now.
I want to put in a likely refinement: It was homo sapiens but not all of them. The conquering supremacy tribes are the main culprits, out of which civilisation has been formed.

Perhaps, but perhaps not.  It might be that our H.sap ancestors violently exterminated the other hominids.  But all that's really needed to extinct one species is for a new species to better use the needed resources (usually food).  It may simply be that H.sap was a better hunter (or gatherer) so that H.sap families/villages were better fed, and thus increasing in numbers faster.  As resources in an area become scarcer, the other hominids are starved first.

It may be that H.sap had better running endurance, or better spears and clubs, or more robust immunity, or more cooperation in the hunt, or merely a different metabolic rate.

If H.sap violence were the cause of the extinctions, one might expect to find more hominid skeletons with evidence of predation by H.sap.  I'm no expert on the archaeological evidence, though.

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #177 on: November 24, 2019, 10:42:23 AM »
We know H.Sap is much more numerous then the others. They made babies with Neanderthals and Denisovans (And Neanderthals and Denisovans did too before they met the H.Sap) so i think they were just mixed in.

Also i don´t think conquering was a thing then...
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

TerryM

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #178 on: November 24, 2019, 12:50:58 PM »
Great contribution nanning!


Both Asimov - and by extension myself - ignored the damage that AI/Robotics could wreak on all lifeforms we're sharing the globe with.


My bad - & Asimov's
Terry


Politicians need to learn that some of us at least are very concerned at the prospect of AI being released with no oversight and no consultation with those who will at the very least will be forced to compete with them.


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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #179 on: November 24, 2019, 03:27:04 PM »
Asimov was not writing about military robots, for one thing.
For another, he came up with what seemed a sensible, simple set of rules as a plot device, and most of his stories showed how those simple rules turn out to be more complicated than you might think in messy, real world situations.
I think he knew the actual future would not be as rosy as his stories.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

nanning

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #180 on: November 24, 2019, 06:04:52 PM »
Thank you Terry, that's very nice to read! :)


In response to kassy:

I agree, likely not 'conquering' as we know it, but supremacy over nature could for example manifest itself as: A human tribe that think they are predators. Mastering the skills of their spears or arrow & bow or whatever. Fantasy.

That example is a possible mindset resulting from supremacy over living nature. In this case made possible because some extremely intelligent people once thought of inventing new tools, which after their deaths were abused as weapons. Feeding the fantasy.
Supremacy over living nature is a choice where humans cross living nature's constraints and abandon living nature's forced high morality. Once these ideas are in their culture, it is extremely difficult to change back. The endresult is accumulated ever increasing destruction ending in total destruction (anthropocene civilisationocene ;)).
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
   Simple: minimize your possessions and be free and kind    It's just a mindset.       Refugees welcome

Ranman99

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #181 on: November 25, 2019, 03:09:48 AM »
Civilization is a heat engine for spaceship earth. Eventually it has to end the way it will end. And not one thing here is more important than another thing so it is just how the cookie crumbles ;-) What morphs /  mutates next will be what is next. The game must go on!!!
Randy Fitton

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #182 on: November 26, 2019, 12:54:31 AM »
Beware the knock at the door ...

--------------------------------

U.S. Police Already Using 'Spot' Robot From Boston Dynamics in the Real World
https://gizmodo.com/u-s-police-already-using-spot-robot-from-boston-dynami-1840029868

Massachusetts State Police (MSP) has been quietly testing ways to use the four-legged Boston Dynamics robot known as Spot, according to new documents obtained by the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts. And while Spot isn’t equipped with a weapon just yet, the documents provide a terrifying peek at our RoboCop future.

https://data.aclum.org/public-records/use-of-robotics-in-law-enforcement/

The Spot robot, which was officially made available for lease to businesses last month, has been in use by MSP since at least April 2019 and has engaged in at least two police “incidents,” though it’s not clear what those incidents may have been. It’s also not clear whether the robots were being operated by a human controller or how much autonomous action the robots are allowed.



... the ACLU of Massachusetts told Gizmodo via email. “All too often, the deployment of these technologies happens faster than our social, political, or legal systems react. We urgently need more transparency from government agencies, who should be upfront with the public about their plans to test and deploy new technologies. We also need statewide regulations to protect civil liberties, civil rights, and racial justice in the age of artificial intelligence.”

------------------------------

The Mechanical Hound

... A reincarnation of the vengeful Furies from Greek mythology and the epitome of modern perverted science, the Mechanical Hound is a slick electronic hit man formed of copper wire and storage batteries and smelling of blue electricity. He is an omnipresent menace capable of storing "so many amino acids, so much sulphur, so much butterfat and alkaline" that he can inexorably trail the odor index of ten thousand victims to their doom. From his snout projects a "four-inch hollow steel needle," which can inject enough morphine or procaine to quell a rat, cat, or chicken within three seconds. Sniffing its quarry with "sensitive capillary hairs in the Nylon-brushed nostrils," the Hound growls and then scuttles silently toward its prey on eight rubber-padded feet. Sighting through the "green-blue neon light" of its multifaceted eyes, the Hound is masterminded by a central command for rapid deployment and near perfect accuracy.

- Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury




-------------------------------

Unitree is about to ship the first batch of their AlienGo quadrupeds as well:

« Last Edit: November 26, 2019, 02:06:36 AM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

TerryM

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #183 on: November 26, 2019, 05:17:35 AM »
Can one be purchased and modified "in house"?
Are "Caution Attack Robot" signs required - in all jurisdictions?
How many can be deployed in an autonomous Cyber-naught Urban Attack/Delivery Vehicle?
Will an urban drug dealer be able to afford one, or are they reserved for the oligarchy?
How many would be required to protect a dealer on his rounds?
Are lethal and non-lethal models available?
Are they legal even where pitbulls are banned?
Are saddles available?
Can they be put in harness?
Is Amazon's search for an autonomous delivery robot over?


Seriously, where were the compliance officials when someone presented the patents for those! Bradbury's tales were meant to be cautionary, not instructive.


Terry

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #184 on: November 26, 2019, 07:50:28 AM »
Saddles! Yeeehaaa ;D
Come on Terry, saddle up and let's ride out. You were thinking about some medieval game? I have my polsstok at the ready.

Could replace Spain's bull fighting and general dog-fighting :)

Do you know this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robot_Wars_(TV_series) ?

"Bradbury's tales were meant to be cautionary, not instructive."
Same as with Orwell's tales.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
   Simple: minimize your possessions and be free and kind    It's just a mindset.       Refugees welcome

TerryM

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #185 on: November 26, 2019, 11:53:16 AM »
^^
I think my vision had more to do with the myths of the West that were a part of my early youth.


I'm unfamiliar with the Robot Wars series, but in an ancient silent movie that was aired last week the villagers were using polsstok(s) to leap over a moat and free the fair maiden.
I'd never seen them in use but pointed them out to the wife as something that an internet friend had used for getting about amid the myriad canals in rural Netherlands.


In the hands of the stuntmen the polsstok appeared graceful, and their use where many streams are present seems a no brainer. Not part of my heritage though. I'd either wade or swim if a leapable narrows, a fallen tree or a bridge didn't present itself.


The Robot Dogs will provide governments additional means to scare the beJesus out of her subject citizens only until they proliferate in the hands of criminals or the very anti-government elements that they're designed to scare.


Imagine the pimply faced kid who unleashes a lethal gang of them at a high school football game. Tearing apart the uniformed jocks who had made his life hell since their muscles popped out about the same time as his face erupted.
No need for suicide by cop. When it's all over he's back tinkering on something new in his uncle's garage or his mother's basement.
Savage Robodogs that Came from Nowhere, is how the headlines would begin.


Sleep soundly tonight, and contemplate participating digitally in the next protest rallies. ::)
Terry

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #186 on: November 26, 2019, 12:21:58 PM »
Saddles! Yeeehaaa ;D
Come on Terry, saddle up and let's ride out. ...
China's Robot Dog Takes A Walk
http://www.popsci.com/chinas-big-dog-robot-da-gou-takes-walk


Better than a pony - G'et Along, Little Dogies'


Need to take the training wheels off

 China has global ambitions to be a leader in military robotic exports, having already sold armed drones to Nigeria and Saudi Arabia. Expect also to see Da Gou baling about future battlefields in the coming decades.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

NeilT

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #187 on: November 26, 2019, 03:37:03 PM »
I read "China's Robot Dog Takes A" and then my mind ran ahead of the words.... ;D
Being right too soon is socially unacceptable.

Robert A. Heinlein

SteveMDFP

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #188 on: November 26, 2019, 04:05:42 PM »
Saddles! Yeeehaaa ;D
Come on Terry, saddle up and let's ride out. ...
China's Robot Dog Takes A Walk
http://www.popsci.com/chinas-big-dog-robot-da-gou-takes-walk


Better than a pony - G'et Along, Little Dogies'

This could be exceptionally useful for folks limited to wheelchairs.  Curbs, steps, or broken ground are otherwise insurmountable barriers.  The segway folks do make an "iBot" that can do stairs, but it uses wheels.  The ridden dog may be a better solution for short-range excursions.

TerryM

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #189 on: November 26, 2019, 06:38:26 PM »
^^
I'm afraid I'd prefer a palanquin :)

Terry


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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #190 on: November 26, 2019, 07:43:03 PM »
^^
I'm afraid I'd prefer a palanquin :)

Terry
the elephant for me, looking down with a derisive sneer at the posers in their Urban 4 wd Tractors.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

TerryM

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #191 on: November 26, 2019, 09:24:21 PM »
^^
I'm afraid I'd prefer a palanquin :)

Terry
the elephant for me, looking down with a derisive sneer at the posers in their Urban 4 wd Tractors.
I rode an elephant once, just for a short distance but the motion was amazingly relaxing. I'd swap my palanquin for your elephant, unless fuel became a problem.
4 rice bowls/day is pretty economical.
Terry

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #192 on: November 26, 2019, 10:13:49 PM »
 8) :o :)
Can one be purchased and modified "in house"?
Lease, no purchase. I'm sure you can mount a Picatinny rail to it.

The Picatinny rail, or Pic rail for short, also known as a MIL-STD-1913 rail or STANAG 2324 rail, is a military standard rail interface system that provides a mounting platform for firearm accessories.

Quote
Are "Caution Attack Robot" signs required - in all jurisdictions?
That would clash with it's stealth matte black finish.

Quote
How many can be deployed in an autonomous Cyber-naught Urban Attack/Delivery Vehicle?
They always hunt in packs. What one sees, they all see. It makes it easier to triangulate a target.

Watch DARPA Test Out a Swarm of Drones
https://www.theverge.com/platform/amp/2019/8/9/20799148/darpa-drones-robots-swarm-military-test

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is experimenting with using a swarm of autonomous drones and ground robots to assist with military missions. In a video of a recent test, DARPA showed how its robots analyzed two city blocks to find, surround, and secure a mock city building.



It envisions using 250 drones and robots at once. ... Yikes!!!

Quote
Will an urban drug dealer be able to afford one, or are they reserved for the oligarchy?
Elite only. Others need not apply. ( ... unless they pay cash)

Quote
How many would be required to protect a dealer on his rounds?
That's what drones are for.

Quote
Are lethal and non-lethal models available?
You can only charge a human with murder. Anything else is an industrial accident.

Quote
Are they legal even where pitbulls are banned?
Ya sure; you betcha.

Quote
Are saddles available?
Standard, dressage, or side?

Quote
Can they be put in harness?
Are you plowing the north 40?

Quote
Is Amazon's search for an autonomous delivery robot over?
It needs 2 'hands' to hold a package.

That's what it's big brother 'Handler' is for ...



Quote
Seriously, where were the compliance officials when someone presented the patents for those! Bradbury's tales were meant to be cautionary, not instructive.
As the hologram said in the movie, "I Robot" - "That is the right question."
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

TerryM

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #193 on: November 27, 2019, 12:50:59 AM »
^^
Ramen!
Made me Smile ;D  Graveyard humor, or worse. :-\
Terry

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #194 on: November 27, 2019, 03:42:51 PM »
Quote
the elephant for me, looking down with a derisive sneer at the posers in their Urban 4 wd Tractors.
Ah, my politically incorrect friends...

Ban On All Elephant Rides At Angkor Temples To Take Effect Early 2020
Quote
...
The news agency reported that five of the 14 working elephants have been transferred to a community forest about 40km away from the temples.

“They will live out their natural lives there,” Kosal said, adding that the company that owns the elephants will continue to look after them.

The Angkor archaeological complex attracts millions of tourists yearly and many would opt for elephant rides around the temples.

However, the country came under fire recently from animal rights groups for overworking the elephants.

We are extremely glad that the Cambodian authorities are clamping down on such activities, because elephants deserve better.
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #195 on: November 27, 2019, 04:59:52 PM »
FedEx robot sent packing by NYC
Quote
FedEx’s autonomous delivery bot got a cold reception from New York City officials.

After the company’s SameDay Bots — named Roxo — popped up on New York City streets last week, Mayor Bill de Blasio and transportation officials delivered a sharp response: Get out.

FedEx told TechCrunch that the bots were there for a preview party for its Small Business Saturday event and are not testing in New York. Even this promotional event was too much for city officials concerned with congestion and bots taking jobs from humans.

After reports of the bot sightings, the mayor tweeted that FedEx didn’t receive permission to deploy the robots; he also criticized the company for using a bot to perform a task that a New Yorker could do. The New York Department of Transportation has sent FedEx a cease-and-desist order to stop operations the bots,  which TechCrunch has viewed.

The letter informs FedEx that its bots violate several vehicle and traffic laws, including that motor vehicles are prohibited on sidewalks. Vehicles that receive approval to operate on sidewalks must receive a special exemption and be registered. ...
https://techcrunch.com/2019/11/26/fedex-robots-sent-packing-by-nyc/
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #196 on: November 27, 2019, 07:30:50 PM »
FedEx sends a Special Delivery package to Mayor de Blasio ...  ;)

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #197 on: November 27, 2019, 11:12:58 PM »
Cyborg Soldier 2050: Human/Machine Fusion and the Implications for the Future of the DOD
https://madsciblog.tradoc.army.mil/
https://taskandpurpose.com/army-cyborg-soldier-2050-study-2641466143.amp.html

At the direction of the DoD Biotechnologies for Health and Human Performance Council Executive Committee (BHPC), the BHPC study group conducted a year-long assessment entitled “Cyborg Soldier 2050: Human/Machine Fusion and the Impact for the Future of the DOD - CCDC CBC-TR-1599”.



... The primary objective of this effort was to forecast and evaluate the military implications of machines that are physically integrated with the human body to augment and enhance human performance over the next 30 years.

This report summarizes this assessment and findings; identifies four potential military-use cases for new technologies in this area; and assesses their impact upon the DOD organizational structure, warfighter doctrine and tactics, and interoperability with U.S. allies and civil society.

  • ocular enhancements to imaging, sight, and situational awareness
  • restoration and programmed muscular control through an optogenetic bodysuit
    sensor web
  • auditory enhancement for communication and protection
  • direct neural enhancement of the human brain for two-way data transfer

... the BHPC study group analysis suggested that the development of direct neural enhancements of the human brain for two-way data transfer would create a revolutionary advancement in future military capabilities.

According to the report, neural implants are anticipated to start being used by Special Forces, military pilots, drone operators, and intelligence personnel by 2030. By 2050, that circle would expand as the technology is better understood and it becomes more widely available.

... The report also recognizes how individuals with mega-enhanced hearing, eyesight, or cognitive abilities might would have a "defined competitive advantage" over average people in society. How would that be managed?

Quote
... "Efforts should be undertaken to reverse negative cultural narratives of enhancement technologies."

... Although not intrinsically a DOD mission, defense leadership should understand that negative public and social perceptions will need to be overcome, if these technologies are to be fielded.



------------------------------

Scientists Demonstrate Direct Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientists-demonstrate-direct-brain-to-brain-communication-in-humans/

In a new study, technology replaces language as a means of communicating by directly linking the activity of human brains. Electrical activity from the brains of a pair of human subjects was transmitted to the brain of a third individual in the form of magnetic signals, which conveyed an instruction to perform a task in a particular manner. This study opens the door to extraordinary new means of human collaboration while, at the same time, blurring fundamental notions about individual identity and autonomy in disconcerting ways.

... Overall, five groups of individuals were tested using this network, called the “BrainNet,” and, on average, they achieved greater than 80 percent accuracy in completing the task.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-41895-7)

In his book Beyond Boundaries one of the leaders in the field, Miguel Nicolelis, described the merging of human brain activity as the future of humanity, the next stage in our species’ evolution.

He has already conducted a study in which he linked together the brains of several rats using complex implanted electrodes known as brain-to-brain interfaces. Nicolelis and his co-authors described this achievement as the first “organic computer” with living brains tethered together as if they were so many microprocessors. The animals in this network learned to synchronize the electrical activity of their nerve cells to the same extent as those in a single brain. The networked brains were tested for things such as their ability to discriminate between two different patterns of electrical stimuli, and they routinely outperformed individual animals.

If networked rat brains are “smarter” than a single animal, imagine the capabilities of a biological supercomputer of networked human brains.

------------------------------

DARPA Funds Technology for Thought-Controlled Drones
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/614495/us-military-super-soldiers-control-drones-brain-computer-interfaces/amp/

Earlier this month it was reported that the U.S. military is currently developing a brain-computer interface that could allow soldiers to control drones with their thoughts, and without the need for any surgery. With $104 million in funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Next-generation Nonsurgical Neurotechnology Program (N³) is being led by three graduate students at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.

“With this technology, a soldier could act – such as by directing a weapon’s fire or maneuvering a vehicle – at the speed of thought,” ... “There would be no delay from pulling a trigger or turning a steering wheel, but that doesn’t mean that the decision to act would be faster – or better, for that matter,” Mahncke added.

... The point is that such technology might not allow for those split-second decisions not to fire. ... “Friendly fire incidents can occur regardless of how a weapon system is controlled, but the faster the weapon system acts, the less opportunity there is for a soldier to stop the wrong action in time,” said Mahncke.

... DARPA is often on the cutting edge of technology, in the space where laws and ethics are not always clear.

Quote
... “The military has been working on a lot of interesting, and somewhat frightening products,” said Rob Enderle, technology industry analyst at the Enderle Group. “A few years back I read about a technology that basically turned off your inner voice, the one that tells you you can’t do something,” explained Enderle.

----------------------------

A New Joystick For the Brain-Controlled Vehicles Of the Future
https://www.defenseone.com/technology/2019/09/new-joystick-brain-controlled-vehicles-future/160092/

A group of scientists from several universities has created an unobtrusive brain-computer interface strip that could revolutionize the way humans convert their thoughts into a machine-readable format.

A narrow strip affixes to the upper neck, performing the data collection of a traditional EEG cap. The signals are then interpreted by software —aided by machine learning— to produce data that could be used to steer vehicles or operate other computers. The entire system is called SKINTRONICS.



... Beyond brain-based piloting, the military is exploring the use of brain-computer interfaces for communication.

------------------------------

Brain-Computer Interfaces are Developing Faster Than the Policy Debate Around Them
https://www.theverge.com/platform/amp/interface/2019/7/31/20747916/facebook-brain-computer-interface-policy-neuralink

It’s time to talk about what’s possible — and what shouldn’t be ...
« Last Edit: November 28, 2019, 01:41:54 AM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #198 on: November 28, 2019, 02:08:28 AM »
Former Go Champion Beaten By DeepMind Retires Because AI 'Cannot Be Defeated'
https://www.bbc.com/news/amp/technology-50573071
https://www.theverge.com/platform/amp/2019/11/27/20985260/ai-go-alphago-lee-se-dol-retired-deepmind-defeat

The South Korean Go champion Lee Se-dol has retired from professional play, telling Yonhap news agency that his decision was motivated by the ascendancy of AI.

“With the debut of AI in Go games, I’ve realized that I’m not at the top even if I become the number one through frantic efforts,” Lee told Yonhap. ..“Even if I become the number one, there is an entity that cannot be defeated.”

... Since the tournament DeepMind has only improved its AI Go systems. In 2017, it created AlphaGo Zero, a version of the program which surpassed even AlphaGo.

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Sigmetnow

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Re: Robots and AI: Our Immortality or Extinction
« Reply #199 on: November 28, 2019, 04:55:47 PM »
Tesla releases auto wiper update trained by new deep neural net
(Tesla uses Autopilot cameras to activate its wipers, while most other cars use rain sensors.)
“If automatic wipers are not performing to your preference, any manual adjustment to wiper speed will be captured to further train and improve the network in future software updates.”
https://electrek.co/2019/11/28/tesla-auto-wiper-update-trained-deep-neural-net/

Tesla wants to use laser beams to automatically clean debris off cars – Yes really
https://electrek.co/2019/11/25/tesla-laser-beams-clean-debris-off-cars/

Next: a new Sentry Defense option?
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.