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Lord M Vader

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4350 on: August 26, 2016, 11:22:35 PM »
Great post Neven ☺

seaicesailor

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4351 on: August 27, 2016, 12:17:31 AM »
+1. Great post

Dr. Slater somehow was capable to predict a three-headed GAC followed by the (this time for real) mother of all dipoles 50 days in advance : - )

southseas

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4352 on: August 27, 2016, 01:02:05 AM »
Possibly ... but I'm interested what it was his model 'saw' that prompted that rather significant correction a couple of months back?

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4353 on: August 27, 2016, 02:47:29 AM »
"To defy the laws of tradition, is a crusade only of the brave" - Les Claypool

BornFromTheVoid

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4354 on: August 27, 2016, 09:38:53 AM »
Day 4 of the wind driven compaction



Looks like a big increase in concentration across the centre of the remaining pack. So perhaps an uptick in area value? Further steady extent losses look likely too.

budmantis

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4355 on: August 27, 2016, 09:51:18 AM »
When looking at the Wrangel arm I'm reminded of a high rise building about to implode after explosives have been triggered.

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4356 on: August 27, 2016, 10:27:17 AM »
Euro initialized with a 967mb low, which looks like it's dragging a significant slug of warm, moist air with it.  I think the "Wrangel arm" is toast.

http://www.tropicaltidbits.com/analysis/models/?model=ecmwf&region=nhem&pkg=z500_mslp&runtime=2016082700&fh=0
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seaicesailor

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4357 on: August 27, 2016, 10:44:33 AM »
Up to 120 km/h. Another first-timer in Arctic ocean summer?. That can be as much as 100 km/day of ice drift.



Thawing Thunder

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4358 on: August 27, 2016, 10:55:53 AM »
That can be as much as 100 km/day of ice drift.
Kind of Hyperloop for polar bears ...
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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4359 on: August 27, 2016, 10:56:50 AM »
This is tomorrow evening, the fetch across the top of Greenland is set to blow nearly 60Km/hr
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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4360 on: August 27, 2016, 11:22:05 AM »
8 hour loop using AVHRR images.

Alaska in the lower left, storm entering in the upper left.

http://weather.gc.ca/satellite/satellite_anim_e.html?sat=hrpt&area=dfo&type=nir
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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4361 on: August 27, 2016, 11:45:48 AM »

@ BornFromTheVoid

I Watched MODIS, the most part looks to me due cloud not to compaction

Thawing Thunder

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4362 on: August 27, 2016, 01:23:42 PM »
When looking at the Wrangel arm I'm reminded of a high rise building about to implode after explosives have been triggered.
The Thunder was father of the first people, and the Moon was the first mother. But Maxa'xâk, the evil horned serpent, destroyed the Water Keeper Spirit and loosed the waters upon the Earth and the first people were no more.

Neven

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4363 on: August 27, 2016, 02:03:35 PM »
Nice one, TT!

I'm not enjoying my holiday, people. I'm sea kayaking with my daughter and we're having a good time, but in the back of my head I think about the situation in the Arctic, the crazy typhoon heading for Japan...

Anyway, the storm coming in from the mainland bottomed out at 967 hPa on reaching the Arctic shores (it's 969 hPa now, one run later):
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BornFromTheVoid

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4364 on: August 27, 2016, 02:21:01 PM »

@ BornFromTheVoid

I Watched MODIS, the most part looks to me due cloud not to compaction

When is comes to  the quick changes in concentration over large areas, then rain/snow associated with the clouds is the likely source of the variations (and to a lesser degree the clouds themselves).

However, the ice is still moving in the direction that the wind has been blowing, and has been for several days. Concentrating much of the pack toward the general area of the N. Greenland coast.

Nice one, TT!

I'm not enjoying my holiday, people. I'm sea kayaking with my daughter and we're having a good time, but in the back of my head I think about the situation in the Arctic, the crazy typhoon heading for Japan...

Anyway, the storm coming in from the mainland bottomed out at 967 hPa on reaching the Arctic shores (it's 969 hPa now, one run later):

If it helps at all, the latest model runs are very uncertain about the track Typhoon Lionrock will take, but it looks like weakening significantly over the next few days regardless, so that's something!

Also, the latest ECM has conditions turning more favourable for the ice from about day 7 onward, as opposed to the continued damaging conditions forecast in recent days. Lots to happen in the next 7 days though, and knowing how much the forecast can change at a week out doesn't provide much solace.

gerrit

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4365 on: August 27, 2016, 02:55:19 PM »
With such high ocean surface speed (someone mentioned ice drift speed of up to 1 m/s), and ice free conditions above some of the normally covered Arctic basement edges, I was wondering if the Arctic might be in for a fairly unique upwelling event, at least on the Siberian side, where the movement will be more or less parallel to the edge, with the deep water on the right-hand side.

Rather than speculating too much whether it will happen, one can just look for evidence.

Surface salinity would of course be a good signature to such an event, and I see there is this Aquarius satellite mission that can apparently measure it, but couldn't find any data - does anyone know where to find current satellite salinity data?

Tigertown

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4366 on: August 27, 2016, 03:03:42 PM »
Here is HYCOM. Click the SSS one. Can't tell you how good it is, one way or the other.

https://www7320.nrlssc.navy.mil/hycomARC/arctic.html

Bruce Steele

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4367 on: August 27, 2016, 03:42:31 PM »
There is one ITP buoy( #93) recording current sea surface salinities at about 85 north well within heavy pac ice between Greenland and Svalbard. It is currently reading 33.45 and has been slowly rising for over a month. So you can pinpoint that buoy and then look at the HYCOM SSS chart Tigertown linked to check HYCOM accuracy. Close I would say but the ITP is showing slightly higher salinity readings . With the expected winds and drift expected to pass directly over the ITP buoy in the next couple days perhaps surface mixing and upwelling of 35.5 salinity waters not far beneath it will push SSS even higher ? We will soon see. It is interesting that the HYCOM current 30 day run ends on 9-3 ( sept. 3 ) so we are looking at a model and not real time satellite data.

http://www.whoi.edu/page.do?pid=148496
 

Thawing Thunder

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4368 on: August 27, 2016, 05:19:38 PM »
It seems to me the model doesn't take in account the predicted stormy weather conditions very much. I can't see any effect of that ongoing upwelling.
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seaicesailor

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4369 on: August 27, 2016, 05:57:58 PM »

@ BornFromTheVoid

I Watched MODIS, the most part looks to me due cloud not to compaction
Huge compaction. Yesterday the Beaufort section of the CAB could be seen for the first time in weeks, not recognizable. A solid, white, ridged pack with a razor thin edge where there used to be a loose mass of floes and a diffuse edge. Browse back and forth Worldview.

ghoti

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4370 on: August 27, 2016, 06:50:38 PM »
The last ten seconds of the Obuoy 14 movie shows this I think. The view changes from completely open (almost tropical looking) ocean to scattered ice to pack continuous ice as the buoy spins and drifts. Movie now ends at 23:00 August 26, 2016.

http://obuoy.datatransport.org/monitor#buoy14/movie

The azimuth shown at the top of the movie isn't always the same direction when the view is ice free so I expect the ice and the buoy are drifting east the way you suggest the compaction is taking place.

Andreas T

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4371 on: August 27, 2016, 07:10:35 PM »
This terra band 3-6-7 view shows snow drifts I believe. Which as far as I know pushes the signature the satellite "sees" towards the icy end.
Interesting are also the lower concentration lines which divide the ice (which visibly is composed of smaller floes) into the rhomboid structure which will be predominant again when freezing starts to make the floes stick together and snow cover will make the distinctive pattern of smaller floes disappear. This is reminiscent of dislocations in sheared bubble rafts and I think points to compression and shear in the ice pack.

I have marked clouds (probably condensation trails) and their shadows which cast different different lines and  the lower concentration leads (for want of a better word)

forgot to add the worldview link http://go.nasa.gov/2bVoLsA
« Last Edit: August 27, 2016, 07:28:37 PM by Andreas T »

johnm33

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4372 on: August 27, 2016, 07:12:10 PM »
gerrit  http://marine.copernicus.eu/services-portfolio/access-to-products/ to compare with hycom, I mainly look at the 1st and 11nth in the catalogue.

RoxTheGeologist

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4373 on: August 27, 2016, 08:05:23 PM »
This is tomorrow evening, the fetch across the top of Greenland is set to blow nearly 60Km/hr

According to Nullschool, the current fetch is 1000km or more with up to 60 kph winds! Without damping that will produce a maximum swell of around 5m after 24 hours, with a period of about 9 seconds and a wavelength of 140m.  It will cause motion and mixing down to 70m.

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4374 on: August 27, 2016, 09:09:20 PM »
This is tomorrow evening, the fetch across the top of Greenland is set to blow nearly 60Km/hr

According to Nullschool, the current fetch is 1000km or more with up to 60 kph winds! Without damping that will produce a maximum swell of around 5m after 24 hours, with a period of about 9 seconds and a wavelength of 140m.  It will cause motion and mixing down to 70m.

And what must be kept in mind is that 70m deep mixing has not occurred in this region of the Arctic for thousands of years. Until very recently, this area of the Arctic was covered with thick MYI. High winds simply could not cause waves like this.

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4375 on: August 27, 2016, 09:13:38 PM »
A few days ago seaicesailor pointed out some blocks of MYI in a frame I posted off NE Greenland. You can barely see them through the clouds today, but they will not see another year as ice. as they are southbound. The sanctuary failed them.

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4376 on: August 27, 2016, 09:16:10 PM »
Kind of like "Big Block" times 100.

jai mitchell

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4377 on: August 27, 2016, 09:21:38 PM »
I am pretty sure that the near 100% SIE at this region will suppress wave heights and mixing, a lot.
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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4378 on: August 27, 2016, 09:27:50 PM »
This terra band 3-6-7 view shows snow drifts I believe. Which as far as I know pushes the signature the satellite "sees" towards the icy end.
Interesting are also the lower concentration lines which divide the ice (which visibly is composed of smaller floes) into the rhomboid structure which will be predominant again when freezing starts to make the floes stick together and snow cover will make the distinctive pattern of smaller floes disappear. This is reminiscent of dislocations in sheared bubble rafts and I think points to compression and shear in the ice pack.

I have marked clouds (probably condensation trails) and their shadows which cast different different lines and  the lower concentration leads (for want of a better word)

forgot to add the worldview link http://go.nasa.gov/2bVoLsA
Those look like contrails or some thin long cloud.  The dark matches the light displaced.

Michael Hauber

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4379 on: August 27, 2016, 09:41:10 PM »
I cannot believe this is possible, btw. If this were to verify Tokyo's skyscrapers would endure winds of 120-150+ MPH and the city would be hit with a 20 foot+ storm surge. This is literally a vision out of The Day After Tomorrow.

It is relevant to the melt season because it brings a 500mb heat belch into the Arctic around D8-9.



The actual forecast is for a very medicore category 1 hurricane with winds to 97mph, and a storm surge that could reach 3-6 feet.  The typhoon is undergoing extratropical transition, which makes it larger, but weaker (more spread out - however larger storms can generate larger storm surges).  It will be cold core well before it would have a chance to get to the Arctic, so if anything it would be a cold pulse at 500hp (with warm air closer to ground level ahead of the system), but current forecasts have it heading west and disappearing and not getting anywhere near the Arctic. 

The hurricane did have an impact on the Arctic already - the start of the dipole coincided with a burst of warm air along the eastern flank of this system, which lined up with the dipole drawing heat from the Pacific, which has contributed to the highest heat of the current dipole being in the early part. However the high pressure ridge expands onto North Asia quickly cutting off this warm air feed and noticeably reduces the heat available to the dipole.
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Shared Humanity

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4380 on: August 27, 2016, 09:59:59 PM »
I am pretty sure that the near 100% SIE at this region will suppress wave heights and mixing, a lot.

Yes, you're right. Got a little ahead of myself.  ::)

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4381 on: August 27, 2016, 10:00:26 PM »
I am pretty sure that the near 100% SIE at this region will suppress wave heights and mixing, a lot.

I'm sure of that too. There will be some waves in the ESS though:

http://GreatWhiteCon.info/2016/08/the-great-arctic-cyclone-of-2016/#Aug-27

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TerryM

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4382 on: August 27, 2016, 11:02:36 PM »
JimH
Those waves in that location are probably giving S&S some sleepless nights.
This seems to be the kind of weather they warned of, which could release lots of CH4 from the not so deeps off the Arctic coast of Siberia.
With weather like this is it even likely that anyone would be around to notice? Would the storm dissipate any Methane plumes that might even now be spewing, well before they had been spotted by satellite?
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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4383 on: August 27, 2016, 11:03:21 PM »
I am pretty sure that the near 100% SIE at this region will suppress wave heights and mixing, a lot.

I was referring to the conditions extending from the ESS* to the pole right now (well, right then)! I think the winds have had a relatively stable direction and magnitude for the last 12 hours, and don't change significantly for 12 more. The wind direction and location are over an area of low ice concentration.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2016, 12:12:39 AM by RoxTheGeologist »

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4384 on: August 28, 2016, 01:09:11 AM »
The potential intensity of typhoon Lionrock depends very much on the track it takes. A previous ECMWF run had a 940mb low hit the coast north of Tokyo. The reason the model made it so strong was that the forecast track was over very deep warm pools of water just off the coast. More recent model runs take Lionrock further east over cooler water then ashore on the northern coastline where waters are cold. The track is key to the intensity at landfall.

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4385 on: August 28, 2016, 02:26:43 AM »
The typhoon is undergoing extratropical transition, which makes it larger, but weaker (more spread out - however larger storms can generate larger storm surges).

I'm not sure why you reason thusly.  The JTWC disagrees, and they tend to know their stuff.

https://metoc.ndbc.noaa.gov/ProductFeeds-portlet/img/jtwc/products/wp1216prog.txt

Quote
C. IN THE EXTENDED FORECAST THE NORTHERN RIDGE WILL STEER TY 12W
ALONG A NORTHWESTERN TRACK INTO A NEGATIVELY TILTED TROUGH OVER
JAPAN. LANDFALL OVER NORTHERN HONSHU IS EXPECTED AROUND TAU 72.
SOMEWHERE BETWEEN TAU 72 AND 96 TY 12W WILL START TRANSITIONING INTO
AN EXTRATROPICAL SYSTEM BECOMING FULLY EXTRATROPICAL BY TAU 120.
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Kate

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4386 on: August 28, 2016, 02:42:47 AM »
The typhoon is undergoing extratropical transition, which makes it larger, but weaker (more spread out - however larger storms can generate larger storm surges).

I'm not sure why you reason thusly.  The JTWC disagrees, and they tend to know their stuff.

https://metoc.ndbc.noaa.gov/ProductFeeds-portlet/img/jtwc/products/wp1216prog.txt

Quote
C. IN THE EXTENDED FORECAST THE NORTHERN RIDGE WILL STEER TY 12W
ALONG A NORTHWESTERN TRACK INTO A NEGATIVELY TILTED TROUGH OVER
JAPAN. LANDFALL OVER NORTHERN HONSHU IS EXPECTED AROUND TAU 72.
SOMEWHERE BETWEEN TAU 72 AND 96 TY 12W WILL START TRANSITIONING INTO
AN EXTRATROPICAL SYSTEM BECOMING FULLY EXTRATROPICAL BY TAU 120.

Lionrock is being pulled apart
https://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/western-pacific/2016/Typhoon-Lionrock?map=sat

On topic, nullschool image shows lots of warm air being pulled into the arctic atm

Csnavywx

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4387 on: August 28, 2016, 03:18:06 AM »
A better satellite view:

http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/floaters/12W/flash-vis-long.html

Enhanced IR:

http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/floaters/12W/flash-avn-long.html

Analyzed shear over the system is 10kt, pretty low. (source: CIMSS). Cooling cloud tops over the past 6 hours and a shrinking eye on visible point to an increase in intensity. So, I wouldn't say it's being "pulled apart". It's holding its own quite nicely. What you're seeing there are upper level outflow channels highlighted by a cirrus shield. Later, as the negative tilt trough picks up the system, it will encounter higher vertical wind shear. However, this is usually compensated for by increased upper level divergence and improved outflow (Sandy was a good example of this). The reason these hybridized systems can cause trouble is typically due to their immense size and fetch length (for surge) and the introduction of a moist absolutely-unstable layer (MAUL) in the low levels due to colder air being wrapped into the circulation during the earlier stages of extra-tropical transition. If folks recall, Sandy was a weak cat 2/high-end cat 1 near landfall, but had the surge of a much stronger storm, primarily due to the huge fetch length.

AbruptSLR

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4388 on: August 28, 2016, 05:15:54 AM »
On topic, nullschool image shows lots of warm air being pulled into the arctic atm

The attached Nullschool image of surface wind & TPW indicates that it might possibly be raining at the North Pole now.
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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4389 on: August 28, 2016, 05:23:06 AM »

I'm not sure why you reason thusly.  The JTWC disagrees, and they tend to know their stuff.

https://metoc.ndbc.noaa.gov/ProductFeeds-portlet/img/jtwc/products/wp1216prog.txt

Quote
C. IN THE EXTENDED FORECAST THE NORTHERN RIDGE WILL STEER TY 12W
ALONG A NORTHWESTERN TRACK INTO A NEGATIVELY TILTED TROUGH OVER
JAPAN. LANDFALL OVER NORTHERN HONSHU IS EXPECTED AROUND TAU 72.
SOMEWHERE BETWEEN TAU 72 AND 96 TY 12W WILL START TRANSITIONING INTO
AN EXTRATROPICAL SYSTEM BECOMING FULLY EXTRATROPICAL BY TAU 120.

I was referring to the chart which bbr posted, which is for 96 hours.  Not the clearest language on my part though.
Climate change:  Prepare for the worst, hope for the best, expect the middle.

Okono

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4390 on: August 28, 2016, 05:24:25 AM »
Thank you for taking the time to clarify, Michael.  I understand.  :)

Cooling cloud tops over the past 6 hours and a shrinking eye on visible point to an increase in intensity.

Latest Dvorak analysis yielded 6.1 with an estimated 929mb central pressure.  I wish we had reconnaissance on these storms.  I'm ever-fascinated by the "Great Red Eye" tilted look the outflow of these large Pacific storms can acquire.

The currently progged track should leave Tokyo and Yokohama far off center in the better quadrant at worst, surge-wise.  My understanding is that it's particularly difficult to forecast intensity and there's a lot of uncertainty here, but it surely won't be nearly this strong at landfall.

Sadly, it's going to hit the same region that the 3.11 tsunami did.  It's depressing to write this, but they have experience with surge there.
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epiphyte

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4391 on: August 28, 2016, 07:12:31 AM »
Thank you for taking the time to clarify, Michael.  I understand.  :)

Cooling cloud tops over the past 6 hours and a shrinking eye on visible point to an increase in intensity.

Latest Dvorak analysis yielded 6.1 with an estimated 929mb central pressure.  I wish we had reconnaissance on these storms.  I'm ever-fascinated by the "Great Red Eye" tilted look the outflow of these large Pacific storms can acquire.

The currently progged track should leave Tokyo and Yokohama far off center in the better quadrant at worst, surge-wise.  My understanding is that it's particularly difficult to forecast intensity and there's a lot of uncertainty here, but it surely won't be nearly this strong at landfall.

Sadly, it's going to hit the same region that the 3.11 tsunami did.  It's depressing to write this, but they have experience with surge there.

Speaking of which one can only hope it doesn't cut off the power to the gear that's freezing the radioactive ground water and keeping it away from the pacific...

Rob Dekker

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4392 on: August 28, 2016, 09:47:49 AM »
Thank you for taking the time to clarify, Michael.  I understand.  :)

Cooling cloud tops over the past 6 hours and a shrinking eye on visible point to an increase in intensity.

Latest Dvorak analysis yielded 6.1 with an estimated 929mb central pressure.  I wish we had reconnaissance on these storms.  I'm ever-fascinated by the "Great Red Eye" tilted look the outflow of these large Pacific storms can acquire.

The currently progged track should leave Tokyo and Yokohama far off center in the better quadrant at worst, surge-wise.  My understanding is that it's particularly difficult to forecast intensity and there's a lot of uncertainty here, but it surely won't be nearly this strong at landfall.

Sadly, it's going to hit the same region that the 3.11 tsunami did.  It's depressing to write this, but they have experience with surge there.

Speaking of which one can only hope it doesn't cut off the power to the gear that's freezing the radioactive ground water and keeping it away from the pacific...

No kidding.

But we are diverging from the topic.
Back in the Arctic, we just witnessed the removal of one of the Wrangel Arms.
Any guesses for when the remainder of the Wrangel Arm will get consumed by Arctic waters ?
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silkman

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4393 on: August 28, 2016, 09:54:11 AM »
JimH
Those waves in that location are probably giving S&S some sleepless nights.
This seems to be the kind of weather they warned of, which could release lots of CH4 from the not so deeps off the Arctic coast of Siberia.
With weather like this is it even likely that anyone would be around to notice? Would the storm dissipate any Methane plumes that might even now be spewing, well before they had been spotted by satellite?
Terry

I don't know about Shakhova et al but those waves are certainly causing the Northabout crew a sleepless night or two according to the blog young Ros is writing:

"Chukchi Sea UTC 22:15 27 Aug

The Chukchi Sea is wild and we are wet, tired and hungry.

We are into the second day of 25 to 30 knot winds, throwing the boat around and everything in it. Many people are feeling queasy and not managing to eat very much. We are being thrown around in the saloon whenever we try to do anything, such as make a cup of tea or cook dinner. I for one feel ill, weak (through not eating enough), and slightly sick all of the time. All of our kit is soaked from being washed over when we are on watch. We can’t light the stove to dry things out or warm up because it doesn’t work when we’re heeled over. As Barbara put it, it’s all she can do to get onto her watch. Her sleeping bag is soaked because the waves have been leaking through the forward hatch – so is Ben’s, and Denis’ whole bunk is wet. Nikolay has himself strapped into his bunk with bungees to sleep. David is not sleeping because his ley cloth is not keeping him in his bunk properly. Apart from that we are having a wild ride."

http://polarocean.co.uk/wet-wild-not-good-way/


seaicesailor

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4394 on: August 28, 2016, 10:09:21 AM »
Die hard
It still covers a similar extent. 

budmantis

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4395 on: August 28, 2016, 10:26:31 AM »

No kidding.

But we are diverging from the topic.
Back in the Arctic, we just witnessed the removal of one of the Wrangel Arms.
Any guesses for when the remainder of the Wrangel Arm will get consumed by Arctic waters ?
[/quote]

I think some of the Wrangel arm will survive the balance of the melting season, perhaps as much as 50%, depending on what the weather has in store for the next two weeks or so.

seaicesailor

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4396 on: August 28, 2016, 10:42:19 AM »
Any guesses for when the remainder of the Wrangel Arm will get consumed by Arctic waters ?
Based on the current 969 hPa over the area, the transversal drift to come in the next three days, and that I suspect there is another cookie monster precisely there, 0% chance of survival.
But I said that of Big Block and there it is, yet.

Thawing Thunder

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4397 on: August 28, 2016, 12:02:34 PM »
What surprised me was, how fast the smaller arm on the alaskan side finally vanished. It became smaller and smaller and then, all in a sudden it disappeared within 24 hours, while the ice bridge in the Laptev Sea still exists (not to mention Big Block).
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Neven

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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4398 on: August 28, 2016, 12:07:12 PM »
I think that just like the ulna, the radius part of the arm is going to melt out completely, whereas the humerus is going to be pushed into the shoulder:



But look at how fast open water is progressing towards the anus, I mean North Pole:
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Re: The 2016 melting season
« Reply #4399 on: August 28, 2016, 12:52:15 PM »
Those waves are certainly causing the Northabout crew a sleepless night or two

Northabout is now not far from Barrow, and well away from the worst of it:

https://twitter.com/PolarOceanChall/status/769827337068306432
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