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kassy

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #350 on: September 27, 2020, 11:03:24 AM »
There was a great article on aviation which i forgot to post luckily ASLR posted it on his thread:

The linked reference indicates that the climate forcing from global aviation is higher than previously assumed by consensus climate science:

Lee, D. S. et al. (2020) The contribution of global aviation to anthropogenic climate forcing for 2000 to 2018, Atmospheric Environment, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2020.117834

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231020305689

Abstract
Global aviation operations contribute to anthropogenic climate change via a complex set of processes that lead to a net surface warming. Of importance are aviation emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), water vapor, soot and sulfate aerosols, and increased cloudiness due to contrail formation. Aviation grew strongly over the past decades (1960–2018) in terms of activity, with revenue passenger kilometers increasing from 109 to 8269 billion km yr−1, and in terms of climate change impacts, with CO2 emissions increasing by a factor of 6.8–1034 Tg CO2 yr−1. Over the period 2013–2018, the growth rates in both terms show a marked increase. Here, we present a new comprehensive and quantitative approach for evaluating aviation climate forcing terms. Both radiative forcing (RF) and effective radiative forcing (ERF) terms and their sums are calculated for the years 2000–2018. Contrail cirrus, consisting of linear contrails and the cirrus cloudiness arising from them, yields the largest positive net (warming) ERF term followed by CO2 and NOx emissions. The formation and emission of sulfate aerosol yields a negative (cooling) term. The mean contrail cirrus ERF/RF ratio of 0.42 indicates that contrail cirrus is less effective in surface warming than other terms. For 2018 the net aviation ERF is +100.9 mW (mW) m−2 (5–95% likelihood range of (55, 145)) with major contributions from contrail cirrus (57.4 mW m−2), CO2 (34.3 mW m−2), and NOx (17.5 mW m−2). Non-CO2 terms sum to yield a net positive (warming) ERF that accounts for more than half (66%) of the aviation net ERF in 2018. Using normalization to aviation fuel use, the contribution of global aviation in 2011 was calculated to be 3.5 (4.0, 3.4) % of the net anthropogenic ERF of 2290 (1130, 3330) mW m−2. Uncertainty distributions (5%, 95%) show that non-CO2 forcing terms contribute about 8 times more than CO2 to the uncertainty in the aviation net ERF in 2018. The best estimates of the ERFs from aviation aerosol-cloud interactions for soot and sulfate remain undetermined. CO2-warming-equivalent emissions based on global warming potentials (GWP* method) indicate that aviation emissions are currently warming the climate at approximately three times the rate of that associated with aviation CO2 emissions alone. CO2 and NOx aviation emissions and cloud effects remain a continued focus of anthropogenic climate change research and policy discussions.
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #351 on: October 03, 2020, 03:08:50 PM »
Please take these planes off our hands.

OCTOBER 01, 2020
Boeing courting Delta, others to take 737 MAX 'white tails': sources
Quote
SEATTLE/CHICAGO (Reuters) - Delta Air Lines (DAL.N) is among airlines Boeing Co (BA.N) has approached to buy dozens of 737 MAX jets built for clients that have since scrapped their orders or gone bust, two people familiar with the matter said.

As the 737 MAX edges closer to commercial flight after an 18-month grounding, Boeing is scrambling to find buyers for the so-called “white tails” - jets painted white, awaiting an airline livery, or whose color schemes need to be swapped.

The 737 MAX’s ban following two fatal crashes had already caused some carriers to walk and the number of unsold jets has soared as the COVID-19 pandemic decimated demand for air travel and new aircraft. ...
https://www.reuters.com/article/boeing-737max-delta-idUSKBN26M5JK
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blu_ice

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #352 on: October 05, 2020, 12:15:35 PM »
The last A380 superjumbo has been built.

Quote
Sep 25, 2020,12:36pm EDT
The Last A380 Just Rolled Off Airbus’ Production Line. It May Never Fly A Single Passenger.
Eric Tegler

Aerospace & Defense

The last ever Airbus A380 awaits final assembly after rolling off the Airbus production in Toulouse
 
Airbus completed initial assembly of the last A380, the world’s largest passenger plane, at its production plant in Toulouse, France, on Wednesday. The company has built 242 of the double-decker airliners but the future of the final jet, serial number 272 is uncertain. Will it ever fly passengers?

That’s a question for the airline customer, Airbus says. The last A380 is one of eight that Dubai-based Emirates still has on order. Emirates is the largest operator of A380s with a fleet of 115 in service. Thanks to Covid-19, all but a handful of its current fleet of superjumbos is grounded though the airline did resume A380 service to six destinations - Moscow, Toronto, Cairo, Ghuangzhou, London and Paris - starting in July.

As of August, the number of parked A380s worldwide stood at 204, excluding previously retired jets. There simply isn’t passenger demand for superjumbos or other widebodies though analysts point out that airlines are reluctant to take them off the books now since their retirement would trigger impairment charges.

Since A380s form the backbone of its fleet, that’s a thorny problem for Emirates. However there may be a way to partially get around it. Emirates could cancel its final order for superjumbos.

In May, Bloomberg reported that the Middle East carrier was seeking to cancel five of its last eight A380 deliveries. With the pandemic expected to drag on into 2021 and a full rebound in passenger demand not expected until several years later, Emirates may try to cancel its entire order including the very last A380 built.

I asked Airbus for an interview on the future of superjumbo 272 but the company declined, sending emailed responses instead. The last A380 will stay in Toulouse for production checks, engine installation, systems calibration and a test flight. Next, it will go to Airbus’ Hamburg, Germany facility for cabin installation and full painting in Emirates’ livery. And then?

Emirates said it couldn’t comment on its A380 plans, citing the lack of available spokespeople with the onset of the weekend in Dubai. That leaves 272’s future in question.

Other operators like Air France and Lufthansa have announced the retirement of their A380 fleets, possibly as soon as 2022-23. For carriers like Asiana Airlines, Qatar Airways, Etihad Airways, Malaysia Airlines and Thai International Airways, shrinking or retiring the A380 portions of their fleet looks likely. That leaves only a few including British Airways, Singapore Airlines and Qantas as longer term potential A380 operators.

Even for these airlines, the numbers will have to make sense. Industry analyst Dhierin Bechai points out that the minimum A380 fleet size “for aircraft to benefit from scale advantages and service a route is considered to be six aircraft.”

A380 production began in 2006 after a two-year delay and $25 billion in investment from Airbus. The company anticipated a market for up to 1,200 of its massive airliners capable of carrying up to 853 passengers.

In the years since, Airbus estimates that the global A380 fleet has carried approximately 320 million passengers. But in late 2020 it appears possible that the last superjumbo ever built may never carry even one paying passenger.

*Emirates offered this late-breaking statement regarding the A380:

The Emirates A380 experience remains highly sought after by travelers for its spacious and comfortable cabins. The airline will gradually expand the deployment of this popular aircraft in line with demand and operational approvals.

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #353 on: October 07, 2020, 07:41:00 PM »
How Safe Is Air Travel In COVID Time? A JAMA Article Says It's Safer Than You Think
https://www.acsh.org/news/2020/10/01/how-safe-air-travel-covid-time-jama-article-says-its-safer-you-think-15064
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An article in the latest edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association reports that when it comes to risk from the coronavirus, air travel is much safer than you might believe. It is safer than shopping in a supermarket, riding on a train, or going to work in an office. Why? It's all about the air quality in the cabin.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #354 on: October 10, 2020, 03:26:43 AM »
7:44 PM · Oct 9, 2020
Flightradar24: "Qantas' ‘Great Southern Land’ scenic ‘flight to nowhere’ has just departed Sydney. It will return in approximately 7 hours.”
https://mobile.twitter.com/flightradar24/status/1314713440523628549
Image below.  Tweet has a link to track the flight.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Aviation
« Reply #355 on: October 11, 2020, 06:35:45 PM »
The celebrated pilot said that even if the FAA ungrounds the jet next month as expected, additional modifications are needed as soon as possible.
Celebrated pilot Capt. Sully urges further updates to Boeing's 737 MAX
October 10, 2020
Quote
Capt.  Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger  isn’t satisfied that the fixes for Boeing’s 737 MAX proposed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are enough.
In an exclusive interview, the celebrated pilot said that even if the FAA ungrounds the jet next month as expected, additional modifications are needed as soon as possible to improve the plane’s crew alerting system and add a third check on the jet’s angle of attack data.
“I'm not going to say, ‘We're done, good enough, move on,'” said Sullenberger.
“People are going to fly on it and I will probably be one of them,” he added. "The updated MAX will probably be as safe as the (previous model) 737 NG when they are done with it. But it's not as good as it should be."
After  the FAA announced in August the proposed design changes for the MAX’s return to service, there were numerous comments from aviation experts calling for such updates. …
https://www.seattletimes.com/business/boeing-aerospace/celebrated-pilot-sully-urges-further-updates-to-boeings-737-max-and-to-older-737s/
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