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nanning

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #500 on: September 25, 2019, 07:18:50 PM »
<snip>
Did they used to think there was a 'gravitron' particle? For some reason I remembered something like this, but when I searched, all the came up was a carnival ride by that name!  :o

A graviton is the hypothetical boson responsible for the Gravitational interaction (force of Gravity), like the electromagnetic interaction has the foton boson. The Higgs boson is responsible for giving matter mass.

The graviton will have spin 2. If you understand what that means, you'll find it interesting. ;D
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
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wili

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #501 on: September 25, 2019, 07:47:00 PM »
Thanks, nan.

I should know more about this stuff. A highschool friend of mine, who I used to talk with about this stuff back when neither of us knew much about it, went on to help in the discovery of the Higgs boson 'God Particle.' I have obviously not kept up!  :-\
"A force de chercher de bonnes raisons, on en trouve; on les dit; et après on y tient, non pas tant parce qu'elles sont bonnes que pour ne pas se démentir." Choderlos de Laclos "You struggle to come up with some valid reasons, then cling to them, not because they're good, but just to not back down."

nanning

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #502 on: September 25, 2019, 08:17:22 PM »
^^
Very nice wili. Is he a particle physicist? Theoretical or experimental?
If you have the possibility of contact, and your curiosity is strong, many nice come-togethers might ensue :).
Old talk and Higgs talk. And of course... cheers!
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
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sidd

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #503 on: September 26, 2019, 12:18:50 AM »
I have already mentioned one great difficulty with quantum mechanics: Bell's theorem. I should have mentioned the other one, that it is not presently known how to construct a quantized version of general relativity. (special relativity is easier, but also has its own difficulties like Haag's theorem, but GR is much tougher)

A readable article for those with some familiarity with math is the "Quantum gravity" article on Wikipedia. Another problem, discussed by Isham, among others, is that time plays a completely different role in QM than GR ... Isham has a paper from 1993 on arxiv:

https://arxiv.org/abs/gr-qc/9310031

He also has a previous paper from 1992 on arxiv:

https://arxiv.org/abs/1009.2157

Isham writes well, worth reading.

sidd

vox_mundi

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #504 on: September 26, 2019, 01:56:07 AM »
Numbers Limit How Accurately Digital Computers Model Chaos
https://phys.org/news/2019-09-limit-accurately-digital-chaos.html

... Chaos is more commonplace than many people may realise and even for very simple chaotic systems, numbers used by digital computers can lead to errors that are not obvious but can have a big impact. Ultimately, computers can't simulate everything.

The study, published today in Advanced Theory and Simulations, shows that digital computers cannot reliably reproduce the behaviour of 'chaotic systems' which are widespread. This fundamental limitation could have implications for high performance computation (HPC) and for applications of machine learning to HPC.

The study builds on the work of Edward Lorenz of MIT whose weather simulations using a simple computer model in the 1960s showed that tiny rounding errors in the numbers fed into his computer led to quite different forecasts, which is now known as the 'butterfly effect'.

The team investigated the impact of using floating-point arithmetic—a method standardised by the IEEE and used since the 1950s to approximate real numbers on digital computers.

Digital computers use only rational numbers, ones that can be expressed as fractions. Moreover the denominator of these fractions must be a power of two, such as 2, 4, 8, 16, etc. There are infinitely more real numbers that cannot be expressed this way.

In the present work, the scientists used all four billion of these single-precision floating-point numbers that range from plus to minus infinity. The fact that the numbers are not distributed uniformly may also contribute to some of the inaccuracies.

... "The four billion single-precision floating-point numbers that digital computers use are spread unevenly, so there are as many such numbers between 0.125 and 0.25, as there are between 0.25 and 0.5, as there are between 0.5 and 1.0. It is amazing that they are able to simulate real-world chaotic events as well as they do. But even so, we are now aware that this simplification does not accurately represent the complexity of chaotic dynamical systems, and this is a problem for such simulations on all current and future digital computers."

... "These are being used to predict important scenarios in climate change, in chemical reactions and in nuclear reactors, for example, so it's imperative that computer-based simulations are now carefully scrutinised."

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/adts.201900125
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sidd

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #505 on: September 26, 2019, 02:34:52 AM »
Re: floating point, chaos, indeterministic calculations

I'm afraid if i were a reviewer for that paper, i would probably say something like "This is a new and interesting paper, but what is new is not interesting and what is interesting is not new ..."

"single-precision floating-point numbers " says it all, really. They erect a straw man and they have some fun knocking him down. We have known since the sixties of the limitations of single precision. There are much better solutions available today.

sidd
 

binntho

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #506 on: September 26, 2019, 05:39:10 AM »
wili, gravity is counted as one of the four fundamental physical forces. Gravity causes space-time curvature (not the other way around) and the elusive "gravitron" is indeed the hypothetical quantum of gravity, the elementary particle that mediates the force of gravity as Wiki puts it.
because a thing is eloquently expressed it should not be taken to be as necessarily true
St. Augustine, Confessions V, 6

binntho

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #507 on: September 26, 2019, 06:07:31 AM »
This discussion started when archimid (if I remember correctly) stated that weather predictions could be made 100% accurate if we had all the facts and enough computing power.

In essence this is the old discussion of whether the universe is deterministic or not. If it is, then the words I am writing now could theoretically have been predicted with 100% accuracy at any time in the past, right up to the Big Bang itself. Everything would be predetermined, and knowing what will happen next would simply be a question of computing power and having enough knowledge of the system.

Chaos does not preclude determinism, i.e. chaotic systems can be deterministic or not. Chaotic systems behave pseudo-randomly, i.e. it is not practicable in any realistic sense to predict their state 100% since any such prediction would require significantly more computing power and more information than is present in the chaotic system itself.

In other words, a "computer" for predicting a chaotic system would always be significantly more complex than the system itself. Weather is a good example (perhaps the prime example) of a chaotic system and fully predicting it would take more energy and matter and information than is currently available in the universe.

But then comes the spanner in the works - quantum mechanics and the inherent fundamental unpredictability of events such as radioactive decay. If we accept quantum effects as real, the question then becomes whether they could in some way affect the outcome of chaotic macro systems such as weather. In my opinion the answer is that such an effect would be far too small to be ever detected but that cumulatively over time they could affect the outcome in noticeable ways.

Another interesting question that is still not decided amongst scientists is whether biologial systems can be affected by quantum effects. Certain processes in our brain, or during DNA replication, are certainly small enough to fall within the quantum realm, and important enough to change things in the macro world. Research on the in-built compass that some birds have in their nasal region seems to indicate that they are able to keep tab on the quantum state of small magnetic particles to in order to be able to tell north from south.

But given the inherent impossibilities of determinism, quantum randomness seems to be a much more logical solution even if it causes it's own problems. And to avoid determinism we would have to accept that quantum effects do at times change the outcomes of macroscopic events.
because a thing is eloquently expressed it should not be taken to be as necessarily true
St. Augustine, Confessions V, 6

sidd

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #508 on: September 26, 2019, 06:19:31 AM »
Heres a famous simple chaotic deterministic system describing a layer of fluid heated from below. EZ to simulate, have fun.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorenz_system

some code examples are given in the article. With some work, one can modify to use extended precision ,bignum libraries or arbitrary precision libraries and observe the slowdown in computational wallclock time.

sidd

Archimid

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #509 on: September 26, 2019, 09:58:56 AM »
I think the disturbing thing about QM is Bell's theorem. Crudely put, it requires giving up one of the three postulates of locality, causality or free will.

sidd

My bet? Causality is the problem. Time is a limit of human perception like sight limits us to the visible spectrum. QM scratches the surface of that unseen universe but it says nothing about that universe.


Archimid, the EPR paradox has effectively been disproved (your article pointed to a rather weird paper on Bayesian statistics that didn't seem pertinent, except for the discussion of the Einstein - Podolsky - Rosen (EPR) paradox).

The way I understand it is that the EPR paradox has been proved. Einstein meant it as an exercise that proved QM was wrong, hence the paradox part. QM caused "Spooky action at a distance" that shouldn't be possible. But then "spooky action at a distance" was verified. And many more quirks of QM have verified. Since then QM has become a cornerstone of advance sciences and more important, engineering.  QM gets verified time and again.

Einstein was wrong about QM being "wrong". QM is correct, within probability theory. But probability theory is not proof that the world ( or radioactive decay) is random.

The paper I linked could be very helpful to understand why the existence of QM doesn't prove that the universe is random, or that true randomness exists. It is perfectly on topic and it explains why you are wrong about probability distribution being real physical phenomenon.

I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

Archimid

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #510 on: September 26, 2019, 11:18:51 AM »
Heres a famous simple chaotic deterministic system describing a layer of fluid heated from below.


Over at the sacred "extent/area data" thread mitch posted this very excellent link about the topic at hand:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3270390/

From that link:

Quote
In a later, but highly prescient paper, Lorenz [1] also considered the interplay of various scales of motion in determining the predictability of a system. The results showed that errors at the cumulus scale can invade the errors at the synoptic scale in two days and infect the very largest scales in two weeks. Thirty years later, the relevance of this study has been realized in the development of stochastic approaches to represent cumulus convection and its upscale energy transports, and in the emerging efforts to resolve these multi-scale processes in atmospheric simulations at the cloud system-resolving scale


In other words, very small local change can create very large future systemic change. That's chaos.

If an observer of the large scale change don't know about the local change, then large scale changes may appear random to such observer. In that case, by observing the frequency of the event he can develop probabilistic approaches that could help the observer make relatively accurate predictions. Once a distribution is found, the magic of probability and math takes it away. No physical reality needed to obtain useful information.


Quote
Chaotic systems behave pseudo-randomly, i.e. it is not practicable in any realistic sense to predict their state 100% since any such prediction would require significantly more computing power and more information than is present in the chaotic system itself.

A chaotic system is any system for which we haven't found an efficient algorithm. If we find an efficient way to compute a very complex system it is not longer chaotic.


Quote
But then comes the spanner in the works - quantum mechanics and the inherent fundamental unpredictability of events such as radioactive decay. If we accept quantum effects as real, the question then becomes whether they could in some way affect the outcome of chaotic macro systems such as weather. In my opinion the answer is that such an effect would be far too small to be ever detected but that cumulatively over time they could affect the outcome in noticeable ways.

What ever happens at the subatomic level is simultaneously happening at all scales, but it is beyond human perception and for most analysis, completely irrelevant.

 Quantum effects are "real" in that weird stuff is happening that we don't really understand but can predict using probabilities. Quantum effects are not real in terms of quantum theory being based on probability distributions, which only describe frequency of events.

One last try. The probability that an electron is at point A at time B is a very amazing and useful tool. But that probability does not tell me how the electron got to point A at time B.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

sidd

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #511 on: September 26, 2019, 11:25:29 PM »
Re:  how the electron got to point A at time B

Feynman might have said that it did the sum over all histories (including conservation violating histories) from the initial to final state, and then chose the trajectory that minimized the action.

Actually, he probably wouldnt. I was never quite sure how literally he took his calculation method.

sidd

vox_mundi

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #512 on: September 29, 2019, 05:58:18 PM »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Susan Anderson

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #513 on: September 29, 2019, 06:54:21 PM »
FWIW, Feynman hated bullshit. Full stop.

[He hung out with our group of artists at MIT in the mid-80s, when he was working at Thinking Machines. We spent a lot of time with him, and consumed a fair amount (but not too much) of beer together.]

nanning

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #514 on: September 30, 2019, 04:41:19 AM »
Wow Susan, how I envy you!
You must've had special experiences. Do you perhaps have a little bit of a nice story you could share with us?
Analysing the flow of '1's and '0's to optimize the design :) :) :)
cheers!
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vox_mundi

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #515 on: October 03, 2019, 10:47:41 PM »
Rodents With Part-Human Brains Pose a New Challenge for Bioethics
https://gizmodo.com/rodents-with-part-human-brains-pose-a-new-challenge-for-1838741492

Rapid progress in research involving miniature human brains grown in a dish has led to a host of ethical concerns, particularly when these human brain cells are transplanted into nonhuman animals. A new paper evaluates the potential risks of creating “humanized” animals, while providing a pathway for scientists to move forward in this important area.

... Research done in 2013, for example, highlighted the potential for human brain cells to affect the behavior and capacities of nonhuman animals. In experiments, neuroscientists replaced around half of the mice brain with human cells, mostly glia, during development. As my coverage noted at the time, this intervention caused enhancements of the rodent’s cognitive capacities, including “augmentations to memory, learning, and adaptive conditioning.”

... “A chimeric animal that developed evidence of self-awareness and rational decision-making...would warrant a pause in the research and a broader discussion across society about the direction of this research.”

... “The potential generation of a ‘self-aware’ human brain organoid in a vat might create an ethical dilemma. If this is possible, we will need to address the moral status of these organoids.”

... “This concern has already been realized by the creation of mice…[that] perform better than native mice on a battery of learning tests,” in reference to the aforementioned study from 2013. “Thus, the potential of chimeras to manifest enhancement of brain function is a near-term concern, while sentience or self-awareness is a distant future possibility. Nonetheless, as thoughtfully articulated here, the potential behavioral consequences of chimerization should be a concern of all scientists creating human-animal brain chimeras.”

Open Access: H. Isaac Chen, et.al.,  Transplantation of Human Brain Organoids: Revisiting the Science and Ethics of Brain Chimeras, Cell Stem Cell, 2019

« Last Edit: October 04, 2019, 02:37:17 PM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

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Archimid

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #516 on: October 12, 2019, 12:18:25 PM »
Brain tunes itself to criticality, maximizing information processing

https://source.wustl.edu/2019/10/brain-tunes-itself-to-criticality-maximizing-information-processing/

Quote
Taking advantage of their ability to continuously track the activity of neurons for more than a week, the researchers first confirmed that network dynamics in the visual cortex are robustly tuned to criticality, even across light and dark cycles.

Next, by blocking vision in one eye, the researchers revealed that criticality was severely disrupted, more than a day before the manipulation affected the firing rates of individual neurons.

Twenty-four hours later, criticality re-emerged in the recordings — at which point individual neurons were suppressed by the visual deprivation.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

AbruptSLR

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #517 on: October 24, 2019, 06:25:40 PM »
I like the linked open access paper by Y. Jack Ng (2019) entitled: "Entropy and Gravitation: From Black Hole Computers to Dark Energy and Dark Matter", so I thought that I would share it:

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1910.00040.pdf

Abstract: "We show that the concept of entropy and the dynamics of gravitation provide the linchpin in a unified scheme to understand the physics of black hole computers, space-time foam, dark energy, dark matter and the phenomenon of turbulence.  We use three different methods to estimate the foaminess of spacetime, which, in turn provides a back-door way to derive the Bekenstein-Hawking formula for black hole entropy and the holographic principle.  Generalizing the discussion for a static spacetime region to the cosmos, we find a component of dark energy (resembling an effective positive cosmological constant of the correct magnitude) in the current epoch of the universe.  The conjunction of entropy and gravitation is shown to give rise to a phenomenological model of dark matter, revealing the natural emergence, in galactic and cluster dynamics, of a critical acceleration parameter related to the cosmological constant; the resulting mass profiles are consistent with observations.  Unlike ordinary matter, the quanta of the dark sector are shown to obey infinite statistics.  This property of dark matter may lead to some non-particle phenomenology, and may explain why dark matter particles have not been detected in dark matter search experiments.  We also show that there are deep similarities between the problem of "quantum gravity" (more specifically, the holographic spacetime foam) and turbulence."

See also

Title: "The Universe Is Made of Tiny Bubbles Containing Mini-Universes, Scientists Say"

https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/j5yngp/the-universe-is-made-of-tiny-bubbles-containing-mini-universes-scientists-say

Extract: "The key takeaway from Ng's work is: not only can spacetime foam be measured and explored conceptually, but it can also explain the acceleration of the universe by connecting quantum physics, general relativity and dark energy. Ng believes a Theory of Everything is within reach."
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
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vox_mundi

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #518 on: October 30, 2019, 04:59:35 PM »
Cosmic Triangles Open a Window to the Origin of Time
https://www.quantamagazine.org/the-origin-of-time-bootstrapped-from-fundamental-symmetries-20191029/

Like fossils, astronomical objects are not randomly strewn throughout space. Rather, spatial correlations between the positions of objects such as galaxies tell a detailed story of the ancient past.

... One curious pattern cosmologists have known about for decades is that space is filled with correlated pairs of objects: pairs of hot spots seen in telescopes’ maps of the early universe; pairs of galaxies or of galaxy clusters or superclusters in the universe today; pairs found at all distances apart. You can see these “two-point correlations” by moving a ruler all over a map of the sky. When there’s an object at one end, cosmologists find that this ups the chance that an object also lies at the other end.

The simplest explanation for the correlations traces them to pairs of quantum particles that fluctuated into existence as space exponentially expanded at the start of the Big Bang. Pairs of particles that arose early on subsequently moved the farthest apart, yielding pairs of objects far away from each other in the sky today. Particle pairs that arose later separated less and now form closer-together pairs of objects. Like fossils, the pairwise correlations seen throughout the sky encode the passage of time — in this case, the very beginning of time.



Cosmologists believe that rare quantum fluctuations involving three, four or even more particles should also have occurred during the birth of the universe. These presumably would have yielded more complicated configurations of objects in the sky today: triangular arrangements of galaxies, along with quadrilaterals, pentagons and other shapes.

Theorists have found it challenging even to calculate what the signals would look like — until recently. In the past four years, a small group of researchers has approached the question in a new way. They have found that the form of the correlations follows directly from symmetries and other deep mathematical principles. The most important findings to date were detailed in a paper by Arkani-Hamed and three co-authors that took its final form this summer.

... Perhaps the most remarkable aspect of the work, Silverstein and others said, is what it implies about the nature of time. There’s no “time” variable anywhere in the new bootstrapped equation. Yet it predicts cosmological triangles, rectangles and other shapes of all sizes that tell a sensible story of quantum particles arising and evolving at the beginning of time.

Quote
... This suggests that the temporal version of the cosmological origin story may be an illusion. Time can be seen as an “emergent” dimension, a kind of hologram springing from the universe’s spatial correlations, which themselves seem to come from basic symmetries. In short, the approach has the potential to help explain why time began, and why it might end.

As Arkani-Hamed put it, “The thing that we’re bootstrapping is time itself.”

----------------------------

A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics
https://www.quantamagazine.org/physicists-discover-geometry-underlying-particle-physics-20130917/



Physicists have discovered a jewel-shaped geometric object that challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental constituents of nature.

The amplituhedron reconceptualized colliding particles — ostensibly temporal events — in terms of timeless geometry. When it was discovered in 2013, many physicists saw yet another reason to think that time must be emergent — a variable that we perceive and that appears in our coarse-grained description of nature, but which is not written into the ultimate laws of reality.

The new geometric version of quantum field theory could facilitate the search for a theory of quantum gravity that would seamlessly connect the large- and small-scale pictures of the universe. Attempts thus far to incorporate gravity into the laws of physics at the quantum scale have run up against nonsensical infinities and deep paradoxes. The amplituhedron, or a similar geometric object, could help by removing two deeply rooted principles of physics: locality and unitarity.

Locality is the notion that particles can interact only from adjoining positions in space and time. And unitarity holds that the probabilities of all possible outcomes of a quantum mechanical interaction must add up to one. The concepts are the central pillars of quantum field theory in its original form, but in certain situations involving gravity, both break down, suggesting neither is a fundamental aspect of nature.

In keeping with this idea, the new geometric approach to particle interactions removes locality and unitarity from its starting assumptions. The amplituhedron is not built out of space-time and probabilities; these properties merely arise as consequences of the jewel’s geometry. The usual picture of space and time, and particles moving around in them, is a construct.

... Recently, a strange duality has been found between string theory and quantum field theory, indicating that the former (which includes gravity) is mathematically equivalent to the latter (which does not) when the two theories describe the same event as if it is taking place in different numbers of dimensions. No one knows quite what to make of this discovery. But the new amplituhedron research suggests space-time, and therefore dimensions, may be illusory anyway.

http://arxiv.org/pdf/1312.2007.pdf
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

AbruptSLR

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #519 on: November 17, 2019, 01:51:43 AM »
In HIOTTOE, rupa/reality is subject to an observer-dependent interpretation:

Massimiliano Proietti, Alexander Pickston, Francesco Graffitti, Peter Barrow, Dmytro Kundys, Cyril Branciard, Martin Ringbauer and Alessandro Fedrizzi (20 Sep 2019), "Experimental test of local observer independence", Science Advances, Vol. 5, no. 9, eaaw9832, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw9832

https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/5/9/eaaw9832

Abstract
The scientific method relies on facts, established through repeated measurements and agreed upon universally, independently of who observed them. In quantum mechanics the objectivity of observations is not so clear, most markedly exposed in Wigner’s eponymous thought experiment where two observers can experience seemingly different realities. The question whether the observers’ narratives can be reconciled has only recently been made accessible to empirical investigation, through recent no-go theorems that construct an extended Wigner’s friend scenario with four observers. In a state-of-the-art six-photon experiment, we realize this extended Wigner’s friend scenario, experimentally violating the associated Bell-type inequality by five standard deviations. If one holds fast to the assumptions of locality and free choice, this result implies that quantum theory should be interpreted in an observer-dependent way.
“It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.”
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AbruptSLR

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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #520 on: November 18, 2019, 07:44:13 PM »
In HIOTTOE, rupa/reality is subject to an observer-dependent interpretation:



To some readers it may not be clear as to why per the Holographic Interpretation of the Theory of Everything (HIOTTOE), rupa/physical reality can be both holographic and observer-dependent.  In this regard, I provide the following comments:

In a traditional hologram each part of the 2D surface contains information about the entire 3D bulk, so that if the 2D hologram were to be shattered each piece would include 'fuzzy' information about the whole/bulk.  Similarly, per the holographic principle, the 4D time-space continuum that we accept as rupa/physical reality is connected to successive layers of the 'bulk' down to the 12D F-theory bulk by entanglement as illustrated by the first three images.

Also, the YouTube video entitled: “What is Entanglement Anyway? Chris Fields” (for link see Reply #350); helps one to appreciate the relationship within HIOTTOE's timelessly evolved free-will information network to rupa (the physical portion of dhamma) via entanglement (see the fourth image and the associated following extract).

Extract: “Observation is the same thing as interaction, and both are just information exchange through an imaginary boundary

Entanglement is: The condition of interacting with the world through an imaginary interface on which classical information appears.”

Thus, each free-will dimple in the timelessly evolved free-will information network, has some understanding of the bulk, but this understanding comes into sharper focus depending both on: a) how many arrows of direct knowledge that the dimple establishes, and b) on how many errs in indirect understanding that a given dimple makes by establishing 'imaginary boundaries'/'Markov Blankets' through which entanglement must connect the 4D time-space continuum to the deeper bulk circuits within the timelessly evolved free-will information network.

See also:

Title: "Markov blanket"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markov_blanket

Extract: "In statistics and machine learning, the Markov blanket for a node in a graphical model contains all the variables that shield the node from the rest of the network. This means that the Markov blanket of a node is the only knowledge needed to predict the behavior of that node and its children."
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Re: Systemic Isolation
« Reply #521 on: November 19, 2019, 08:22:40 AM »
Perhaps you'll find this interesting:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entropic_gravity
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holographic_principle

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erik_Verlinde:
At a symposium at the Dutch Spinoza-institute on 8 December 2009 he introduced a theory of entropic gravity. In this theory, gravity exists because of a difference in concentration of information in the empty space between two masses and its surroundings; he also extrapolates this to general relativity and quantum mechanics. He said in an interview with the newspaper de Volkskrant,[3] "On the smallest level Newton's laws don't apply, but they do for apples and planets. You can compare this to the pressure of a gas. Molecules themselves don't have any pressure, but a barrel of gas has." It appears that Verlinde's approach to explaining gravity leads naturally to the correct observed strength of dark energy.

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erik_Verlinde#Emergent_gravity_and_the_dark_universe
On 8 November 2016 Erik Verlinde published his new theory of gravity, where gravity is not one of the four fundamental forces of physics but, rather, gravity is emergent from other fundamental forces.[1][14][15] In this work, he argues that unlike in anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, holography and the area law do not apply exactly in de Sitter space (which models our universe) because there is an additional entropy associated with the cosmological horizon. If this entropy were evenly distributed throughout space, it would contribute a volume law term to the entropy which becomes dominant at large length scales and is related to dark energy.
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