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Author Topic: The Nares Strait thread  (Read 354593 times)

Andreas Muenchow

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #400 on: January 14, 2015, 12:09:00 AM »
Nares Strait ... is narrower than Fram Strait, but it transports as much fresh ocean water as does its wider sister facing Europe. Few people know this, including climate scientists who often model it with a bathymetry that is 10,000 years out of date from a time when Nares Strait did not yet exist.

I'm not sure what Muenchow is getting at here. 'Fresh' ocean water sounds like icebergs + ice meltwater, leaving overall total salt+fresh volume comparison to Fram up in the air. Probably clarified in his 2006 paper http://dx.doi. org/10.1175/JPO2962.1


Sorry for the sloppy language there ... I meant the amount of liquid freshwater relative to "ambient water" that has a salinity of 34.8 (think of this as grams of salt in a kg of seawater). So if you observe a salinity of 33.8, it has some freshwater in it that diluted the original water that has 34.8. So, melted ice, rivers, rain, melted snow all make water fresh. There is also (solid, frozen) freshwater in ice and icebergs.

What matters for climate is the amount of vertical density (=salinity; temperature has little impact on density in Arctic waters) stratification in the downstream northern North-Atlantic . This determines how much "new" deep water forms at the surface that then sinks to great depth (2000-m or so) and that then circulates around the globe slowly mixing and rising until it gets back to the surface, maybe, a 1000 years later, somewhere in the North Pacific. So, freshwater flux is what modelers want from me as a metric to include in and/or check their models against. In Fram Strait exports its freshwater mostly as ice while Nares Strait exports freshwater mostly as water.

My little quib about the bathymetry of climate models being 10,000 years out of date, well, I was poking fun of the majority of models that do not have a Nares Strait and in these models all Arctic-to-Atlantic exchanges happens via Fram Strait. There are several arguments why this is not a great idea that relate to the scales of motion of an ocean that is vertically stratified. In a nutshell, such fluids have lots of structure and energetic motions at 5-10 km horizontal scales. That's why, in Nares Strait, you can often see (in the absence of winds) flows to south along Ellesmere and no flow or flow to the north along Greenland. Notice in many radar images that the ice on each side of Nares Strait has a distinctly different appearance that relates to its surface roughness. Different physics, different currents, different ice, different shades of gray.

Physics is fun ... and thank you all for exposing so much great stuff here ... and I feel strongly encouraged by the new Sentinel imagery that you posted here ;-)
« Last Edit: January 14, 2015, 12:17:00 AM by Andreas Muenchow »
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #401 on: January 14, 2015, 03:46:47 PM »
Per the DMI (http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/kennedy.uk.php) NOAA AVHRR 2015-01-14  06:12 UTC image (and the 01-13  06:23 image), the lozenge has almost reached Hans Island (moving about 55 km in 24 hours even after having seriously slowed down yesterday at Joe Island).  Will it stop?  Will it get stuck?  Will it shatter?  (Yesterday I predicted it would continue spinning after hitting Joe Island.  It appears to not be spinning.)

The shark remains off the mouth of Petermann Fjord.  I certainly didn't expect it to get stuck there!  (love or hunger?, if I was to anthropomorphize the animalized ice floe)  It moved maybe 10 kilometers in 24 hours, but mostly across the strait, not down the strait. There may be ice debris (mélange) piling up behind the shark.

Not much movement of ice in the Lincoln Sea in 24 hours, per the AVHRR images.  The floe closest to the Greenland side of the mouth of Robeson Channel moved the most (maybe 5 km).

On the east side of the Lincoln Sea (north of Greenland), a large crack has extended/widened north from Cape Morris Jesup in the past 24 hours.
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viddaloo

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #402 on: January 14, 2015, 04:31:06 PM »
Am I reading it wrong, or is the average flow through Nares and Kennedy about 3 times bigger than that of the Amazon?
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Andreas Muenchow

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #403 on: January 14, 2015, 05:38:42 PM »
Am I reading it wrong, or is the average flow through Nares and Kennedy about 3 times bigger than that of the Amazon?
It depends what you mean by average flow. If you want to know how much volume flows southward through Nares Strait, that number is about 10 times that of the Amazon River. If you want to know how much freshwater (zero salinity) flows through Nares Strait (relative to ocean water that has 34.8 grams per kilograms), then Nares Strait transports about half as much freshwater to the south as does the Amazon River. This is all just counting the ocean, not ice. That's extra for Nares Strait, but zero for the Amazon.

It is very hard to measure freshwater flux, because one needs multiple ocean current measurements across as section and with depth along with multiple salinity measurements, because both currents and salinity change by a rather large amount in the time averages both with depth and across from Greenland to Ellesmere Island.

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viddaloo

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #404 on: January 14, 2015, 06:39:06 PM »
If you want to know how much volume flows southward through Nares Strait, that number is about 10 times that of the Amazon River. If you want to know how much freshwater (zero salinity) flows through Nares Strait (relative to ocean water that has 34.8 grams per kilograms), then Nares Strait transports about half as much freshwater to the south as does the Amazon River. This is all just counting the ocean, not ice. That's extra for Nares Strait, but zero for the Amazon.

Thanks, Andreas. I'm pretty amazed by this fact. Although not technically a river, the Nares Strait is to my knowledge one–directional (it doesn't change during the day or during the year), unlike Saltstraumen or other tidal flows, so with the narrow river–like topography of the Nares, it would not surprise me if this was the greatest 'river' in terms of sverdrups in the world. (Obviously not counting the Gulf Stream, that in no way has narrow, river–like topography.)
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #405 on: January 14, 2015, 08:25:24 PM »
Today's DMI Sentinel image is out.  The lozenge is floating past Hans Island and the shark remains stuck on Joe Island, although a piece of its' head' broke off which is floating downstream. The shark, with a small floe, now form a bridge across most of Nares Strait. (Fast ice off of Petermann Fjord prevents anything floating between Joe Island and Greenland.) Will this close the strait for the season? Or will something break?  Time will tell.  Ice is definitely backing up behind this bridge. 
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solartim27

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #406 on: January 15, 2015, 11:08:38 PM »
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #407 on: January 16, 2015, 01:52:32 AM »
Poor shark; it was fun watching you while you lasted.

Thanks, solartim27 for posting.  Jury duty kept me busy all day today (and will again tomorrow).
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viddaloo

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #408 on: January 16, 2015, 12:34:01 PM »
Can someone explain this image for me? What do we see in this picture?



(NOAA Jan15 12.34 UTC)
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Laurent

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #409 on: January 16, 2015, 12:49:33 PM »
We see the Lincoln sea viddaloo being smashed and sent through Nares strait. For the black part It may be a cloud or an artifact.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Sea
« Last Edit: January 16, 2015, 06:44:31 PM by Laurent »

solartim27

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #410 on: January 16, 2015, 06:18:53 PM »
viddaloo, this may be more basic than you want, but it's northwestern Greenland on the bottom, with the Nares Straight running to the bottom left corner.  It is labeled on the sat map image section as Kennedy on this link (map is 1/2 way down page on left):
http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/kennedy.uk.php

The remains of the shark are stationary in front of Peterman, with a large flow approaching.  Will it break through, or maybe get the arch started?
http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/images/MODIS/Kennedy/201501160731.NOAA.jpg
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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #411 on: January 16, 2015, 06:29:19 PM »
viddaloo, this may be more basic than you want, but it's northwestern Greenland on the bottom, with the Nares Straight running to the bottom left corner.

Solar, what confuses me is you have the color black in 3 main places:

1) The Nares Strait itself.
2) The big black blob in the upper right.
3) Inland Greenland and near the shore.

Am I right to believe that 1) and 3) is new/thin ice (not open water), and that 2) is some sort of cloud or fog causing an image error?
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Andreas Muenchow

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #412 on: January 16, 2015, 07:21:35 PM »
: viddaloo

Solar, what confuses me is you have the color black in 3 main places:

1) The Nares Strait itself.
2) The big black blob in the upper right.
3) Inland Greenland and near the shore.

Am I right to believe that 1) and 3) is new/thin ice (not open water), and that 2) is some sort of cloud or fog causing an image error?
1. Thin ice;
2. Clouds;
3. Don't know (inland) and thin ice (near the shore).

It is a thermal image that shows the amount of "heat" received by the satellite sensor. The ocean is "hot" at its freezing point of -1.7 C while the surface of thick ice is as cold as the air above it. If the air is very clear (few particles), then there is nothing that can radiate heat, however, clouds to radiate heat and their temperature depends on where the cloud is and what type of particles do the "oscillations" that radiates off at the (infra-red) frequency that the satellite senses ... or so I think.
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A-Team

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #413 on: January 16, 2015, 07:58:47 PM »
Black smokers ... we saw a lot of those clouds last year sweeping across the central Arctic Ocean. Not recalling whether they were ice fog, low clouds, thick clouds, warm clouds, or what. They are quite different in appearance from wispy clouds (which cast shadows on the ice).

Quite a bit of movement in today's Sentinel.

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #414 on: January 17, 2015, 02:29:23 AM »
Black smokers ... we saw a lot of those clouds last year sweeping across the central Arctic Ocean. Not recalling whether they were ice fog, low clouds, thick clouds, warm clouds, or what. They are quite different in appearance from wispy clouds (which cast shadows on the ice).

Quite a bit of movement in today's Sentinel.
The ice really does not seem strong enough to resist being ground up at the approach to the strait. I'm pessimistic about an arch forming.  The strait remaining open may weaken Baffin ice, it seems.  Amateur perspective here for sure.
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viddaloo

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #415 on: January 17, 2015, 02:45:21 AM »
My own amateur perspective was expanded when learning in this thread that the flow in this strait is 10 times the flow of the Amazon River. No wonder it flows even in winter with that kind of proportions.

(Still trying to find the viking or norse name for this strait, as vikings traded with inuits all the way up to Ruin Island inside the strait.)
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #416 on: January 17, 2015, 04:29:54 AM »
Comparing the January 14 with the January 16 Sentinel images of "Kennedy" shows an odd shaped floe going about 75 km (~35 km/day) from the mouth of Robeson Channel to Ellesmere's Lady Franklin Bay (opposite Petermann Fjord).  (Another identifiable floe moved a similar 75 km and just past Petermann Fjord.)  Therefore, I suspect the pieces of the shark are now at least to Hans and Franklin Islands.

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nukefix

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #417 on: January 17, 2015, 02:09:51 PM »
How thick is that ice that is currently flowing out through Nares?

A-Team

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #418 on: January 17, 2015, 03:33:10 PM »
How thick is that ice that is currently flowing out through Nares?

It depends very much on the year and arch/not; no real bottom line to take away. The results from upward looking sonar are described here at quite an interesting level of detail: http://icyseas.org/2012/08/. I didn't see annual total ice volume nor an origin map of the Arctic ocean.

solartim27

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #419 on: January 18, 2015, 04:38:19 AM »
Has there been a wind shift?  Flow direction has reversed at the entrance to Nares.  Main channel has not had any good coverage for a while.  (Sorry, I don't know how to do the fancy link with the changing images)

http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/images/MODIS/Kennedy/20150117s01a.ASAR.jpg

http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/images/MODIS/Kennedy/20150116s01a.ASAR.jpg

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #420 on: January 18, 2015, 09:29:03 AM »
Yes, according to earth.nullschool.net winds are now blow in the direction of the Strait from the south, reaching 25 km/h in the northern part.

Here is Lincoln, nothing yet from more south.

A-Team

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #421 on: January 18, 2015, 02:33:06 PM »
Here is a speculative interpretation of competing forces acting on the ice in Lincoln Sea. The purple arrows represent the 'inward' collapse of the Nares arch that we've been following. The yellow arrows show Arctic Ocean ice being pulled apart (slightly) towards the Fram Strait in a cracking pattern we have seen develop many times but not necessarily come to full development. The red arrows are where the Arctic Ocean forces are 'taking over' from the Nares sphere of influence. If this plays out, the purple region will get taken up in the Fram-ward motion.

The wind at Nares is from the north again and currently opposes the above scenario in the Fram as well.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2015, 02:48:38 PM by A-Team »

solartim27

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #422 on: January 18, 2015, 07:50:17 PM »
Sentinel gives a nice shot today, no major changes, ice is flowing, but not as fast.

Today: 
http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/images/MODIS/Kennedy/20150118s01a.ASAR.jpg

2 days ago:
http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/images/MODIS/Kennedy/20150116s01a.ASAR.jpg
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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #423 on: January 18, 2015, 10:46:03 PM »
Wouldn't this continued flow, although slower, be driven by water currents in the strait and the slower speed is because strong winds are not aiding the flow?

Tor Bejnar

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #424 on: January 19, 2015, 01:58:12 AM »
The two floes I identified as having gone about 75 km in two days on January 16 (i.e., from 14th to 16th) have moved an additional **drum roll** only 15 or 20 km in the subsequent two days (16th to 18th)!

With movement this slow, I imagine a bridge could fairly easily form.
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solartim27

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #425 on: January 19, 2015, 07:32:55 AM »
Tor will be happy to hear there is a good sized chunk of the shark transitioning to the Kane area on DMI, not broken up, just not covered when I first looked at Sentinel. 

I was looking around the DMI page and found lots of motion developing over towards Fram, as A-Team showed above.  The Nord station gives a pretty good overview.

http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/nord.uk.php

1/18: http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/images/MODIS/Nord/20150118s01a.ASAR.jpg

1/16: http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/images/MODIS/Nord/20150116s01a.ASAR.jpg

1/15: http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/images/MODIS/Nord/20150115s01a.ASAR.jpg

Similar motion can be seen at the pages labeled Dove further south on the east coast.

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Tor Bejnar

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #426 on: January 19, 2015, 05:01:36 PM »
Happy me!  I'm realizing that this ice shark didn't die, but multiplied (broke into pieces) and is going south to its/their happy hunting ground (melt & sublimate).
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johnm33

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #427 on: January 20, 2015, 01:21:52 AM »
SH Looking at A-Teams scene and description above, in my imagination [if nowhere else] the deep circumpolar drift spins upwards just south of the red arrows, [ it carries excess inertia/speed from being further south and the rotational/orbital energy implicit in that, plus it's a lot closer to the axis of rotation and suffers from a deficit of spin] so apart from breaking up/through the Pacific water above it, it seems to be overturning anti-clockwise as it surfaces and heads for Nares[and all points south] the yellow arrows indicate the ongoing process as the water of this current tries to relieve it's stress whilst heading for Fram. One of the consequences is that the water heats a little, but bear in mind this is deeper warmer more saline water  and again if nowhere else but in my imagination [in this shot] you can see the black smoker clouds emanating from the central part of the broken ice that's heading for Nares being blown north [this area of water is energetically fraught and much more likely to evaporate]. I also suspect that the reason the ice is breaking up so easily whilst maintaining it's shape is that last winter there was a lot of snow falling on to barely frozen ocean creating a lightweight sea ice of fairly normal thickness which implies easier melt and more sail. [ and prospects for a far too interesting year].

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Tor Bejnar

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #429 on: January 20, 2015, 03:09:07 PM »
Yup:
Between Sentinel 18th and 19th images, ice moved about 6 km in the Lincoln Sea, 22 km in the Robeson Channel, 28 km off of Petermann Fjord, 29 km near Hans Island, 40 km at north end of Kane Basin (largest piece of shark), 22 km in mid-Kane Basin and 20 km at the south end of Kane Basin.
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viddaloo

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #430 on: January 21, 2015, 08:38:33 PM »


More Nares Strait 'Fun Facts': I recently watched a docu on the lower Amazon River, and noticed that the narrator told me you couldn't see land if you were on a ferry in the middle of it. While the topography is different, to say the least, with Nares at 3 times the width of the lower Amazon at the narrowest part of the Strait, for all I know it may just be possible to be in the center of it and not see land on either side.

Also, as we remember, the stream or throughput in the mostly one–directional Nares current is 5–10 times that of the Amazon River.
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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #431 on: January 22, 2015, 10:02:31 AM »
In a sequence of two DMI Sentinel-1A images, ice can be seen racing down a narrow channel. At the same time some ice in the wider basin goes in opposite direction. Maybe you can appreciate the "gyre" from the attached Uni Hamburg ASMR2 derived sea ice concentration animation.

(ATM these images are not in the public Sentinel archive (yet), DMI appears to able to acquire Sentinel-1A data from a better source.)

(the Sentinel picture needs a click to start animating)
« Last Edit: January 22, 2015, 10:42:48 AM by Wipneus »

viddaloo

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #432 on: January 22, 2015, 01:14:00 PM »
Bridge forming?

The ice transport seems to have stopped today. Is this just temporary, or for the season?



Edit: Transport seems to have started again in the course of just 101 minutes.



Edit2: The strait looks pretty empty (black). A consequence of ice transport having stopped for a number of hours, or days?
« Last Edit: January 22, 2015, 02:30:25 PM by viddaloo »
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #433 on: January 22, 2015, 02:19:30 PM »
Between January 19 and January 21 Sentinel images (http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/lincoln.uk.php), individual ice floes have moved southward as follows:
100 km from Nares Strait in the Lincoln Sea (on western side) - 2 km in two days.
Lincoln Sea closer to Nares Strait - 17 and 22 km in two days (more movement closer to Nares).
Lincoln Sea to Robeson Channel - 34 km in two days.
within Robeson Channel - 60 km in two days.
between Petermann Fjord and Franklin Island - 65 km in two days.
within Kane Basin (north) - 60 km in two days (shark remnant)
within Kane Basin (south) - 42 km in two days.
Baffin Bay (north) - 30 km in two days
Baffin Bay (further south) - 10 km in two days (my old floe with an integral sign on it)

I cannot say what is happening today, but ice was on the move between 3 days ago and yesterday.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #434 on: January 22, 2015, 02:50:02 PM »
Between January 21 and 22 NOAA AVHRR images, there is clear movement of ice in the Lincoln Sea toward Nares Strait. 

Look at the Sentinel images for a clearer look at floes (and mélange and thin ice) within Nares Strait.  Even then, some details may be deceptive.  I've learned a lot by comparing two images a day apart, seeing what moves and what doesn't, and what 'just changes'.  Some floes have markings that are recognizable for a long time, and some markings 'disappear'.
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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #435 on: January 22, 2015, 05:38:19 PM »
Is this an iceberg?  I've been watching this thing for a couple of months now.  I think it came down from the north around the end of October and may have been sitting on the Petermann sill much of the time since.  Today's Sentinal image shows it merging into traffic so it may be interesting to watch it travel down the Nares.

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #436 on: January 22, 2015, 06:40:19 PM »
Here is a detail (in 10m/pix resolution) of the iceberg. Image from Jan 17, when still on the Petermann doorstep. No other hi-res data I could find. It could be a double ice floe with some heavy deformed crests in between.
(needs a click of course)

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #437 on: January 22, 2015, 06:43:27 PM »
Sonia (good eyes!), it is either an iceberg or a floe (about 3 km 'square-ish') - I cannot tell the difference.  I see it on January 4 just off of Petermann Fjord (Hall Basin), then drifting about 25 km northwestward, then - in the past two days - getting caught in the current, as you note.  It will be fun watching. [grammar edit]
« Last Edit: January 23, 2015, 01:42:20 PM by Tor Bejnar »
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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #438 on: January 23, 2015, 07:55:22 AM »
Attached a 40m/pix detail of Sonia's floe or iceberg located in the main stream just outside the Petermann fjord (direction top of this image), data from 2015-01-21. As can be seen the white is part of a bigger and darker floe.
In the animation the floe is on the move to the south.

(click to animate)
« Last Edit: January 23, 2015, 08:17:56 AM by Wipneus »

viddaloo

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #439 on: January 23, 2015, 07:14:46 PM »
The two fracture zones are getting really close to each other now. What happens if/when they connect?

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #440 on: January 23, 2015, 08:41:03 PM »
Coincidental (?) with the interacting Lincoln Sea fracturing and Fram Strait-related fracturing, a 'huge' piece of Arctic ice has moved southward towards the Lincoln Sea about 20 km (I'm not sure in how many days because of clouds or fuzzy images prior to the "NOAA AVHRR 2015-01-23  12:46" image similar to the one attached above by viddaloo).  You can see the thin (black) eye-shaped openings where the transverse fault has kinks (especially one about 150 km north of Nares Strait - what I'm calling a fault is the crack in the ice that goes almost straight and is nearly perpendicular to Nares Strait).  A curvy crack (more-or-less perpendicular to this fault) that opened up a couple/few km yesterday has mostly closed, but 'all' the ice has moved toward Nares Strait.

(For scale, Petermann Glacier is about 14 km wide at its narrowest.)
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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #441 on: January 23, 2015, 09:47:48 PM »
The two fracture zones are getting really close to each other now. What happens if/when they connect?
It looks like the Lincoln fracture zone is going to over-write Nare's. However as Andreas M has shown, Arctic water will still flow out Nares because the Arctic Ocean is 6-8" higher than Baffin Bay (after adjusting for tidal variance). I guess this means the bergs will still go out the strait -- ice in the Lincoln sea may be cracking Fram-wards but we're seeing very little bulk transport out of Lincoln, only more cracking.

Coincidental (?) with Lincoln Sea and Fram Strait-related fracturing, a 'huge' piece of Arctic ice has moved southward about 20 km towards the Lincoln Sea.
Interesting. Can you post a screenshot or two? I am not picturing how this would work as incompressible ice is already filling Lincoln.

Tor Bejnar

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #442 on: January 23, 2015, 10:17:48 PM »
A-Team: Did you mean "Lincoln fracture zone is going to over-write Fram's"?

On your flashing images, my "huge piece of ice" is bounded on the left by the fault/crack that is perpendicular to Nares Strait and on the right by the Fram Strait complex of cracks.  It is roughly 200 to 250 km wide.  This block of ice is re-filling the Lincoln Sea more slowly than the Lincoln Sea is losing ice to Nares. 

Not only are 5 to 20 km hunks of ice breaking off the Arctic ice mass and moving toward and into Nares Strait, but this large piece of the Arctic ice mass has also moved toward Nares Strait.  (Changing winds and currents might stop this movement, but the recent movement is clear from analyzing the "eye shaped" openings in the fault, and (separately) measuring the decreasing distances of "known points" (crack locations) on the "huge piece of ice" with the Greenland shore.)

Did this help?

Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

viddaloo

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #443 on: January 23, 2015, 10:25:24 PM »
It looks like the Lincoln fracture zone is going to over-write Nare's.

Funny, I don't get what either of you try to say! But at least I share in A–Team's confusion about what Tor is on about!  ;D (Edit: And in Tor's about A–Team.)

As usual, nothing personal, I just like to know what you mean.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #444 on: January 24, 2015, 12:27:55 AM »
Thanks for letting me know.  I'll try to figure out another way to share what I'm seeing (but it won't be today).
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

viddaloo

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #445 on: January 24, 2015, 01:36:04 PM »
Fram fracture zone expanding westward 21–23 January.
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A-Team

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #446 on: January 24, 2015, 03:07:08 PM »
Nice broken glass effect!

Below is the 24th. The area of pending 'takeover' is a bit awkwardly located for Sentinel so let's hope for cloud-free

viddaloo

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #447 on: January 24, 2015, 07:37:43 PM »
Thx.

Fram fracture zone expanding westward 22–24 January (and some fun).
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viddaloo

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #448 on: January 24, 2015, 09:24:12 PM »
(Am I the only one who sees a guy with sunglasses going down the drain?)
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be cause

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Re: The Nares Strait thread
« Reply #449 on: January 24, 2015, 10:06:07 PM »
.. and I've never imagined I would see the Arctic pouring into the Atlantic so dramatically .Sunglasses or not , is what's happening in Lincoln Sea exceptional or should my awe be directed elsewhere :)
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