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Author Topic: Zero-Carbon Farming and Living via the Acorn Path  (Read 22643 times)

Bruce Steele

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Re: Zero-Carbon Farming and Living via the Acorn Path
« Reply #100 on: January 07, 2020, 01:25:04 AM »
Dear Martin, Walnuts are a forage crop for me and walnut trees end up on highway frontage and therefor free game. One of the amazing things about the “acorn challenge “ was that foraging turned out to be  the cheapest way to get to zero fossil fuel and NOT starve. Maybe it is silly to test out what no grocery store and nothing more than retained memory will get you but, it was fun. My wife wants to know why we aren’t putting ourselves to the challenge again ? First year one month, second year three months . We haven’t tried year round but who knows when circumstances demand ?
 If you’d ever like to limit yourself to forage or homegrown let me know. Organic SU was such an inspiration to me , he in Greece an my efforts here in S.Cal. We helped each other along !
 

Florifulgurator

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Re: Zero-Carbon Farming and Living via the Acorn Path
« Reply #101 on: January 17, 2020, 09:06:19 PM »
Alas there aren't many oaks around my new place here in Bavaria and they haven't had much acorns.

The forage tree for me would be European beech. The nuts are only slightly toxic, and that can be neutralized by simply roasting them. I will try them in quantity come September.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fagus_sylvatica

It might perhaps be a good idea to re-establish American beech in the West.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fagus_grandifolia

Google image search on my avatar image gives "wood". In fact it is the lower part of David Hilbert's tombstone.

Bruce Steele

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Re: Zero-Carbon Farming and Living via the Acorn Path
« Reply #102 on: January 17, 2020, 09:38:48 PM »
It is planting season for frost tolerant crops here in SCal. I managed to get about a quarter acre of ground covered in compost made from manure and chipped brush. Cover crop of favas ,peas and oats went on another acre. In the composted area I have spelt, potatoes, shallots and cabbage. Timing everything to maximize what little rain we get means getting frost tolerant crops in before the first rain and if I am lucky I won’t need to irrigate.
 I bought spelt several years ago and have been growing more each year as I increase my seed bank.
I learned I can put the grain heads on a concrete slab and scuff it with smooth soled boots and dehull it. A screen pass and winnowing finish and clean up the grain.
 Potatoes are also from potatoes I have kept for several years , a variety called Yellow Finn. Shallots that I plant as bulbs produce seed so each year I plant both shallot bulbs and shallot from seed. Like onions the shallots from seed don’t produce seed until the bulb is planted the next year.
 Martin, I will buy a beech and name it for you.
 The electric wheel hoe is still working well for me and it cuts down on hand weeding. My biodiesel tractor isn’t working because I screwed up the fuel system with bad fuel.
 I have about 500lbs. acorns drying. I gleaned about 35-40 tons of butternut squash this year and I am still feeding pigs three squash per pig per day. I put the squash in a long pile under the pine trees where they are somewhat protected from freezes but nothing but minor frosts so far. I cover them with a roll of floating row cover.
 Less than 5 inches of rain so far and half the rain season is over. Looking like the long drought still is hanging on here in paradise. Last year we got a normal amount of rain and partly filled the reservoir but one year of normal rain doesn’t break a seven year drought.
 I am seriously thinking of building a very deep root cellar. Starting to think building a hole isn’t quite as crazy as the bomb shelters of the 1950s. I can rationalize cold storage but I might add some plumbing which is verging on nut job but I honestly  think the people in charge are nuts. How do you mitigate our climate roulette and governance dystopia?