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Author Topic: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD  (Read 433137 times)

sidd

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1450 on: February 26, 2019, 10:44:30 PM »
Enjoy that beer ? That extra little zing was from Roundup. No extra charge, donated by Monsanto.

https://www.americancraftbeer.com/a-dangerous-pesticide-found-in-beer/

(it's really a herbicide ...)

sidd

vox_mundi

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1451 on: February 27, 2019, 01:00:42 PM »
French Vineyards Try to Break Glyphosate Addiction 
https://phys.org/news/2019-02-french-vineyards-ready-glyphosate-addiction.html

The vaunted terroirs of France's vineyards have for decades been saturated with the world's most widely used [carcinogenic] weedkiller, but grape growers say the day is soon coming when glyphosate will no longer be part of the fine wine process.

President Emmanuel Macron has challenged the industry to stop using the herbicide—considered "probably cancerogenic" by the World Health Organization's cancer agency—faster than anyone else.

He had initially pledged to completely outlaw the weedkiller, most widely known under Monsanto's Roundup brand, by 2021, though Macron admitted last month the target was probably too ambitious.

... à votre santé
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

sidd

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1452 on: March 01, 2019, 08:52:23 AM »
This is not directly related to climate change, but to agriculture in the USA:

"Giessel, 66, said he had once gotten to the point where he didn’t have to borrow his working capital and had a relatively new set of equipment, but he has had to borrow money for the last three years just to put in a crop."

I am seeing this a lot. Farmers who had their nose above water are goin under.

"The February survey of rural bankers in parts of 10 Plains and Western states showed that nearly two-thirds of banks in the region raised loan collateral requirements on fears of a weakening farm income. The Rural Mainstreet survey showed nearly one-third of banks reported they rejected more farm loan applications for that reason."

"Grain prices peaked in 2012 and prices have roughly fallen 36 percent since then for soybeans, 50 percent for corn and 48 percent for wheat."

“The big key in terms of whether or not we enter a financial crisis would be what would happen to land values,” Featherstone said. “So far land values have gradually declined, so that has kind of prevented us from maybe entering a situation like we did in the 1980s.”

I was ther in the 80's. Nobaody wants that again. Might happen.

sidd

Klondike Kat

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1453 on: March 01, 2019, 05:50:13 PM »
This is not directly related to climate change, but to agriculture in the USA:

"Giessel, 66, said he had once gotten to the point where he didn’t have to borrow his working capital and had a relatively new set of equipment, but he has had to borrow money for the last three years just to put in a crop."

I am seeing this a lot. Farmers who had their nose above water are goin under.

"The February survey of rural bankers in parts of 10 Plains and Western states showed that nearly two-thirds of banks in the region raised loan collateral requirements on fears of a weakening farm income. The Rural Mainstreet survey showed nearly one-third of banks reported they rejected more farm loan applications for that reason."

"Grain prices peaked in 2012 and prices have roughly fallen 36 percent since then for soybeans, 50 percent for corn and 48 percent for wheat."

“The big key in terms of whether or not we enter a financial crisis would be what would happen to land values,” Featherstone said. “So far land values have gradually declined, so that has kind of prevented us from maybe entering a situation like we did in the 1980s.”

I was ther in the 80's. Nobaody wants that again. Might happen.

sidd

He is cherry picking the 2012 drought year, when food prices skyrocket due to agricultural losses.  Recent prices are similar to what they were in 2010.  This appears to be nothing more than fear-mongering.

sidd

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1454 on: March 01, 2019, 10:21:58 PM »
Nevertheless i am seeing increasing signs of financial stress among small (less than a few thousand acres) farmers in the Midwest.

sidd

Klondike Kat

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1455 on: March 01, 2019, 10:44:38 PM »
Quite possible.  Large farms and favorable weather have led to abundant harvests, thereby depressing prices.  Not to mention the ever increasing pressures applied by local municipalities trying to gobble up prime real estate.

kassy

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1456 on: March 02, 2019, 10:06:34 AM »
Climate change is shifting productivity of fisheries worldwide

...

The study looked at historical abundance data for 124 species in 38 regions, which represents roughly one-third of the reported global catch. The researchers compared this data to records of ocean temperature and found that 8 percent of populations were significantly negatively impacted by warming, while 4 percent saw positive impacts. Overall, though, the losses outweigh the gains.

"We were surprised how strongly fish populations around the world have already been affected by warming," said Free, "and that, among the populations we studied, the climate 'losers' outweigh the climate 'winners.'"

...

When examining how the availability of fish for food has changed from 1930 to 2010, the researchers saw the greatest losses in productivity in the Sea of Japan, North Sea, Iberian Coastal, Kuroshio Current and Celtic-Biscay Shelf ecoregions. On the other hand, the greatest gains occurred in the Labrador-Newfoundland region, Baltic Sea, Indian Ocean and Northeastern United States.

Although the changes in fisheries productivity have so far been small, there are vast regional discrepancies. For instance, East Asia has seen some of the largest warming-driven declines, with 15 to 35 percent reductions in fisheries productivity. "This means 15 to 35 percent less fish available for food and employment in a region with some of the fastest growing human populations in the world," said Free. Mitigating the impacts of regional disparities will be a major challenge in the future.

and more on:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190228154846.htm

Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1457 on: March 02, 2019, 06:37:54 PM »
Considering the lobster: Maine joins US Climate Alliance
Quote
Maine is the latest state to join the U.S. Climate Alliance, as Governor Janet Mills (D) announced her intent in a speech which expressed concerns about climate change affecting Maine’s famous lobster industry, among other repercussions.
...
In addition to joining the Alliance, Mills announced her intentions to see that Maine reaches 80 percent renewable electricity generation by 2030, and 100 percent by 2050. Mills said her administration will create a Maine Climate Council. The council — to consist of various officials, experts, and industry and non-profit leaders — will lead the state’s efforts to curb emissions. ...

Mills listed a number of ways climate change is already affecting Maine, noting that “The Gulf of Maine is warming at a rate faster than 99 percent of the world’s oceans, driving our lobster populations further up the coast.” She also cited wildly fluctuating temperatures in the state and more acidic coastal waters. ...
https://electrek.co/2019/03/01/maine-us-climate-alliance/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1458 on: March 03, 2019, 06:06:19 PM »
U.S.:  Ruined crops, salty soil: How rising seas are poisoning North Carolina’s farmland
Quote
Pugh estimates that recent flooding — and the associated salinization — cost him $2 million in lost crops over the past five years. Last year, the field where Manda is now working became so pockmarked with barren patches Pugh stopped planting it altogether.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/ruined-crops-salty-soil-how-rising-seas-are-poisoning-north-carolinas-farmland/2019/03/01/2e26b83e-28ce-11e9-8eef-0d74f4bf0295_story.html
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kassy

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1459 on: March 05, 2019, 09:51:39 AM »
Italy may depend on olive imports from April, scientist says

Extreme weather blamed for plunge in country’s olive harvest – the worst in 25 years

...

In the past 18 months, Italy has experienced summer droughts, autumn floods and spring ice waves.

Olive trees are weakened by these kinds of weather shocks and, even if they recover, are left more vulnerable to outbreaks of the xylella fastidiosa bacterium and olive fly infestations, which have hit farmers in Italy and Greece, Valentini said.

Italy’s Coldiretti farmers’ union estimates that the cost of the olive oil collapse this year has already reached €1bn.

...

Beyond Italy, the European commission has projected 2018-19 olive harvests to drop by 20% in Portugal and 42% in Greece, although industry sources said final figures there could be significantly worse.

Greek farmers were devastated by extreme drought and then heavy rains, which acted as a “trigger event” for olive fly infestations, according to Valentini.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/mar/05/italy-may-depend-on-olive-imports-from-april-scientist-says

El Cid

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1460 on: March 05, 2019, 10:24:59 AM »
Italy may depend on olive imports from April, scientist says

Extreme weather blamed for plunge in country’s olive harvest – the worst in 25 years

Yes we can blame it on the weather but have you seen these oilve plantations? They are just terrible from a soil health point of view. Clean cultivation, herbicides, nothing to hold the top soil together, the first rain washes it all away, creating gullies, etc. Zero biodiversity I might add. No soil there just dirt. No surprise the trees are sick...a terrible sight if you ask me

Neven

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1461 on: March 05, 2019, 12:10:14 PM »
Indeed, I just translated a documentary on southern Italy, and those barren soils around the trees depressed me:
Il faut comparer, comparer, comparer, et cultiver notre jardin

magnamentis

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1462 on: March 05, 2019, 08:40:39 PM »
Indeed, I just translated a documentary on southern Italy, and those barren soils around the trees depressed me:

perhaps i missed something but this is the kind of soil where olive trees grow for eons so to say, it's their natural environment and i personally have never seen (doesn't mean it does not exist) an olive tree growing inside a green lawn or field..

what i know for sure that where i live and my grand parents live, in southern spain, it has been that way when i was a boy, hence around 60 years ago an as well in greece as well as in palestine/israel it has been that way for as long as we have documents that show or describe "oliven haine" and in our region down here olive trees grow in the hottest regions inland for hundreds of kilometers up north while in the more humid regions near the coast or lakes orange and lemon tries prevail in the open and unfortunately all that stuff under plastic.

if i did not miss a point and you perhaps thought it has to be more green around olive trees i can tell that there is no reason to be depressed, that's the only way olive trees grow, in more humid regions they have to strong competitors and can't prevail, they do where most other plants die due to aridity.
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El Cid

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1463 on: March 05, 2019, 09:20:31 PM »
I don't think you are right. Modern herbicides created the opportunity for clean cultivation with not a weed in sight - before those, it was simply not possibble. 200 or 2000 years ago people mowed/cut the weeds to reduce competition but left the cuttings in place, keeping soil critters alive, and as they did not uproot the weeds/grasses, there were some roots in the ground keeping the soil together. What you see now in an olive plantation is that the topsoil (whatever there is left) is washed away because there is nothing to hold it there. And yes, it is probably like that in the past 40-50-60-70 yrs. Doesn't mean it's good. Let's not forget that ancient Romans could deplete their own soil so much, that it was considered a very good year if it gave 4 times back the seed that was planted and grains could not be profitably grown at all...after that soils were not cultivated for hundreds of years at many places...

El Cid

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1464 on: March 05, 2019, 09:27:01 PM »
Let me add this:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/only-60-years-of-farming-left-if-soil-degradation-continues/

"if current rates of degradation continue all of the world's top soil could be gone within 60 years"

"The causes of soil destruction include chemical-heavy farming techniques, deforestation which increases erosion, and global warming"

Soil erosion is at least as big a danger as climate change. Current practices are totally unsustainable.

vox_mundi

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1465 on: March 10, 2019, 12:51:19 AM »
How America’s Food Giants Swallowed the Family Farms   
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/mar/09/american-food-giants-swallow-the-family-farms-iowa

Across the midwest, the rise of factory farming is destroying rural communities. And the massive corporations behind this devastation are now eyeing a post-Brexit UK market 

... the cycle of economic shocks has blended with government policies to create a “monopolisation of the livestock industry, where a few multinational corporations control a vast majority of the livestock”.

Gibbons explains: “They are vertically integrated, from animal genetics to grocery store. What they charge isn’t based upon what it costs to produce, and it’s not based on supply and demand, because they know what they need to make a profit. What they have done, through government support and taxpayer support, is to intentionally overproduce so that the price stays low, sometimes below the cost of production. That kicks their competition out of the market. Then they become the only player in town.

“Over time, it has extracted wealth and power from communities. We can see how that has impacted rural main streets. You can see the boarded-up storefronts. You can see the lack of economic opportunity.”

Gibbons says that corporations game the system by obtaining low-interest, federally guaranteed loans to build concentrated animal feeding operations (Cafos) that then overproduce. But they know the government will buy up the surplus to stabilise prices.

---------------------------

High-Tech Agriculture: Farmers Risk Being 'Locked In' to Unsustainable Practices 
https://phys.org/news/2019-03-high-tech-agriculture-farmers-tounsustainable.html

Digital approaches in farming are called "precision agriculture", which aims to measure the needs of crops or livestock as precisely as possible to be able to apply "the right amount at the right time". This has proven to be a valuable approach, particularly for crops, and has been driven by the development of embedded computing, GPS guidance and machine control interfaces.

The precision-agriculture approach can also help reduce inefficiencies and waste. For example, precision pesticide application methods can significantly reduce spray falling outside areas to be treated and thus the amount of pesticide entering the environment. In this way, sprayers can maintain treatment effectiveness while reducing application rates 20% to 40%.

However, precision agriculture does not call into question pesticide use. It works by refining current practices and does not encourage the exploration of alternatives. This is what scientists call "technological lock-in", with precision approaches reinforcing pesticide use rather than eliminating it. This in no way prepares us for farming that is less reliant on pesticides – farmers become locked in.

Like digital approaches developed in other industrial sectors, those for farming tend to impose standardisation and optimisation under well-controlled conditions. The risk, therefore, is that digital technology could increase productivity but also cut employment in the sector, boost farm size, and deepen technological dependence, with relatively little positive impact on sustainability.
« Last Edit: March 10, 2019, 01:25:57 AM by vox_mundi »
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vox_mundi

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1466 on: March 11, 2019, 04:59:41 PM »
Sick Marine Mammals Turning Up on California Beaches in Droves 
https://m.phys.org/news/2019-03-sick-marine-mammals-california-beaches.html

... While the exact reason for the increase in the number of strandings this year is unknown, Higuchi said it could be tied to warmer ocean waters caused by an El Nino weather pattern or excess stormwater runoff from all of this winter's rains.

Warm waters often reduce the amount of bait fish in the ocean, such as sardines and anchovies, which larger marine mammals eat. The smaller forage fish tend to swim in cold water, so during an El Nino event the fish may be diving deeper or farther out than usual—out of the reach of young sea lions
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Bruce Steele

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1467 on: March 11, 2019, 05:28:04 PM »
The Calif. Sea Lion population is at carrying capacity and we should expect higher mortalities when and if an El Niño arrives here. Current anchovy surveys show a healthy stock with egg and larva analysis of about a million ton biomass. There are several threatened and endangered steelhead and salmon populations suffering from Calif. Sea Lion predation .
 


"Population: The U.S. population of California sea lions is currently estimated at up to 300,000 animals, all on the Pacific coast. From an estimated population of about 10,000 animals in the 1950s, U.S. California sea lion numbers have grown rapidly since the 1970s and the species is now at “carrying capacity”—near the highest level the environment can sustain—according to wildlife biologists. A population survey conducted in 2006 by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) documented 1,200 California sea lions and 1,000 Steller sea lions near the mouth of the Columbia River alone.
Diet: California sea lions feed on a variety of fish and shellfish, including salmon, steelhead, Pacific whiting, herring, mackerel, eulachon, lamprey, codfish, walleye Pollock, spiny dogfish and squid. In recent years, they have also been observed preying on Columbia River sturgeon. Studies of scat samples collected in coastal waters and the Columbia River estuary indicate that salmon comprise 10 to 30 percent of the animals’ diet. Additional studies have shown that the percentage of salmon and steelhead in sea lions’ diet increases as they move upriver. Each year since 2004, California sea lions have consumed 3,000 to 3,500 salmon and steelhead immediately below Bonneville Dam, according to an ongoing study by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers."

vox_mundi

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1468 on: March 11, 2019, 05:29:13 PM »
Fatal Horizon, Driven by Acidification, Closes In on Marine Organisms in Southern Ocean 
https://phys.org/news/2019-03-fatal-horizon-driven-acidification-marine.html

Marine microorganisms in the Southern Ocean may find themselves in a deadly vise grip by century's end as ocean acidification creates a shallower horizon for life, new University of Colorado Boulder research finds.

The modeling study, published today in the journal Nature Climate Change, forecasts that at current carbon dioxide emission rates, the depth at which some shelled organisms can survive will shrink from an average of 1,000 meters today to just 83 meters by the year 2100, a drastic reduction in viable habitat.

The steep drop, which could happen suddenly over a period as short as one year in localized areas, could impact marine food webs significantly and lead to cascading changes across ocean ecosystems, including disruptions of vital global fisheries.

While the individual simulations of the model differed on the timing of the threshold change—with some predicting it as early as 2006 and others as late as 2038—the research suggests that the change may be an inevitability in large regions of the Southern Ocean regardless of future mitigation efforts.

"If emissions were curbed tomorrow, this suddenly shallow horizon would still appear, even if possibly delayed," Lovenduski said. "And that inevitability, along with the lack of time for organisms to adapt, is most concerning."

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-019-0418-8
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 05:37:55 PM by vox_mundi »
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vox_mundi

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1469 on: March 11, 2019, 06:10:25 PM »
Game Over Man; Game Over! ...

Few Pathways to an Acceptable Climate Future Without Immediate Action
https://phys.org/news/2019-03-pathways-climate-future-action.html

...The massive analysis shows that meeting the 2.00 C target is exceptionally difficult in all but the most optimistic climate scenarios. One pathway is to immediately and aggressively pursue carbon-neutral energy production by 2030 and hope that the atmosphere's sensitivity to carbon emissions is relatively low, according to the study. If climate sensitivity is not low, the window to a tolerable future narrows and in some scenarios, may already be closed.

... If the climate sensitivity is greater than 3.00K (median of assumed distribution), the pathway to a tolerable future is likely already closed. 



Robust abatement pathways to tolerable climate futures require immediate global action, Nature Climate Change (2019).
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1470 on: March 11, 2019, 09:45:50 PM »
Rainfall Changes for Key Crops Predicted even with Reduced Greenhouse Gas Emissions 
https://phys.org/news/2019-03-rainfall-key-crops-greenhouse-gas.html

Even if humans radically reduce greenhouse gas emissions soon, important crop-growing regions of the world can expect changes to rainfall patterns by 2040. In fact, some regions are already experiencing new climatic regimes compared with just a generation ago. The study, published March 11 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, warns that up to 14 percent of land dedicated to wheat, maize, rice and soybean will be drier, while up to 31 percent will be wetter

Drier regions include Southwestern Australia, Southern Africa, southwestern South America, and the Mediterranean, according to the study. Wheat cropland in Central Mexico is also headed for a drier future. Wetter areas include Canada, Russia, India and the Eastern United States.

The four crops in the study represent about 40 percent of global caloric intake and the authors say that, regardless of how much mitigation is achieved, all regions—both wetter and drier—need to invest in adaptation, and do so urgently in areas expected to see major changes in the next couple of decades.

Drier conditions are expected for many major wheat producers. In Australia, about 27 percent of wheat-growing land will see less precipitation, under a mid-emissions scenario. Algeria (100 percent), Morocco (91 percent), South Africa (79 percent), Mexico (74 percent), Spain (55 percent), Chile (40 percent), Turkey (28 percent), Italy (20 percent) and Egypt (15 percent) are other major producers that will be affected.

Maisa Rojas el al., "Emergence of robust precipitation changes across crop production areas in the 21st century," PNAS (2019).
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 09:52:24 PM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

El Cid

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1471 on: March 12, 2019, 08:08:51 AM »
I have some doubts about modelling future rainfall patterns, as scientists struggle very hard even to replicate the Green Sahara with there models. They need to tweak them quite a lot to replicate the paleorecord. And the Green Sahara is quite a recent event. I also read some studies where historical Holocene Optimum rainfall patterns were not very well replicated by the models.

vox_mundi

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1472 on: March 19, 2019, 01:27:16 PM »
England Could Run Short of Water Within 25 Years   
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/mar/18/england-to-run-short-of-water-within-25-years-environment-agency

Environment Agency chief calls for use to be cut by a third   

... “Around 25 years from now, where those [demand and supply] lines cross is known by some as the ‘jaws of death’ – the point at which we will not have enough water to supply our needs, unless we take action to change things,” Bevan told the Guardian, before a speech on Tuesday at the Waterwise conference in London.

In the speech, Bevan says: “Water companies all identify the same thing as their biggest operating risk: climate change.” By 2040, more than half of our summers are expected to be hotter than the 2003 heatwave, he says, leading to more water shortages and potentially 50-80% less water in some rivers in the summer.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Klondike Kat

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1473 on: March 19, 2019, 07:42:24 PM »
I have some doubts about modelling future rainfall patterns, as scientists struggle very hard even to replicate the Green Sahara with there models. They need to tweak them quite a lot to replicate the paleorecord. And the Green Sahara is quite a recent event. I also read some studies where historical Holocene Optimum rainfall patterns were not very well replicated by the models.

I agree.  While increasing temperatures will result in increased overall rainfall, trying to pinpoint certain patterns is tenuous at best.

vox_mundi

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1474 on: March 20, 2019, 09:17:14 AM »
Pesticide Residues Found In 70% of Produce Sold in US Even After Washing   
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/mar/20/pesticide-residues-produce-even-after-washing-us

... According to the Environmental Working Group’s annual analysis of US Department of Agriculture data, strawberries, spinach and kale are among the most pesticide-heavy produce, while avocados, sweetcorn and pineapples had the lowest level of residues.

More than 92% of kale tested contained two or more pesticide residues, according to the analysis, and a single sample of conventionally farmed kale could contain up to 18 different pesticides.

Dacthal – the most common pesticide found, which was detected in nearly 60% of kale samples, is banned in Europe and classified as a possible human carcinogen in the US.

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Monsanto: Roundup Substantial Factor In Man's Cancer, Jury Finds In Key Verdict - Again 
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/mar/19/monsanto-trial-roundup-verdict-edwin-hardeman-cancer

A federal jury in San Francisco found Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide was a substantial factor in causing the cancer of a California man, in a landmark verdict that could affect hundreds of other cases.

... Hardeman’s case is considered a “bellwether” trial for hundreds of other plaintiffs in the US with similar claims, which means the verdict could affect future litigation and other cancer patients and families. Monsanto, now owned by the German pharmaceutical company Bayer, is facing more than 9,000 similar lawsuits across the US.


... [the judge] issued something of a rebuke of the company in one procedural order last week, saying:

Quote
... "Although the evidence that Roundup causes cancer is quite equivocal, there is strong evidence from which a jury could conclude that Monsanto does not particularly care whether its product is in fact giving people cancer, focusing instead on manipulating public opinion and undermining anyone who raises genuine and legitimate concerns about the issue.”

The unanimous ruling on Tuesday follows a historic verdict last August in which a California jury in state court ruled that Roundup caused the terminal cancer of Dewayne Johnson, a former school groundskeeper. That jury said Monsanto failed to warn Johnson of Roundup’s health hazards and “acted with malice or oppression”, awarding Johnson $289m in damages.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2019, 09:41:32 AM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1475 on: March 20, 2019, 10:14:42 PM »
Predicted Deforestation in Brazil Lead to Local Temperature Increase Up to 1.45 C   
https://phys.org/news/2019-03-deforestation-brazil-local-temperature.html



... The authors found that deforestation and forestation generally appeared to have opposite effects of similar magnitude on local temperature. However, the nature of the effect and the magnitude of the temperature change depended on latitude: in tropical and temperate regions, deforestation led to warming, while forestation had cooling effects. In boreal regions, deforestation led to slight cooling, though the magnitude of the effect was smaller. The magnitude of the forest change effects was greatest in tropical regions, with, for example, deforestation of approximately 50 percent leading to local warming of over 1°C.

The authors used their model to predict local temperature change in Brazil between 2010 and 2050. Assuming the current rate of illegal deforestation is maintained, this predicted an annual land surface temperature rise of up to 1.45°C in some areas by 2050. ...

Prevedello JA, Winck GR, Weber MM, Nichols E, Sinervo B (2019) Impacts of forestation and deforestation on local temperature across the globe. PLoS ONE 14(3): e0213368
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Climate change, the ocean, agriculture, and FOOD
« Reply #1476 on: March 20, 2019, 11:28:35 PM »
SHTF Plan: UK’s Emergency Plans for No-deal Brexit Begin to be Put Into Action
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/mar/20/uks-emergency-plans-for-no-deal-brexit-begin-to-be-put-into-action

Ministers to decide within days whether to initiate full-scale Operation Yellowhammer 

With the country placed on a knife-edge by Theresa May’s latest Brexit crisis, the government is preparing for “any outcome” with a decision on Monday on whether to roll out the national Operation Yellowhammer contingencies for food, medicine and banking.

Operation Yellowhammer: https://www.nao.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Contingency-preparations-for-exiting-the-EU-with-no-deal.pdf



It emerged on Wednesday that ministers had banned NHS hospitals from publishing risk assessments about how Brexit might affect them, allegedly because doing so could “put public wellbeing at risk”.

The Department of Health and Social Care has written to NHS trusts in England telling them not to put into the public domain their own analyses of the pitfalls facing them. ...
telling them they must “not share this information”


Meanwhile, Kent is going full steam ahead with its contingency plans to prevent gridlock on its roads in the event of congestion in Dover or Calais.

Concrete barriers have already been erected on the main port artery in Kent, with a section of the London-bound M20 between junction 8 and junction 9 now operating as a 50mph contraflow for normal traffic. Work on signage will be completed over the weekend.

The coastbound section will be closed off to all but lorry traffic from next week to allow Highways England to carry out a dry run to cope with possible chaos after 11pm on 29 March.

Manston airport near Ramsgate is in the final stages of preparation for use as a lorry park for up to 6,000 heavy goods vehicles in the event of gridlock.

According to reports, the Brexit secretary, Stephen Barclay, told cabinet ministers in a letter: “Operation Yellowhammer command and control structures will be enacted fully on 25 March unless a new exit date has been agreed between the UK and the EU.”

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UK ‘Four Meals Away from Anarchy’ In Event of Brexit No-deal, Warns Expert



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Secret Cabinet Office Document Reveals Chaotic Planning for No-Deal Brexit 
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/mar/22/secret-cabinet-office-document-reveals-chaotic-planning-for-no-deal-brexit



The extent and range of the impact of a no-deal Brexit is revealed in a confidential Cabinet Office document that warns of a “critical three-month phase” after leaving the EU during which the whole planning operation could be overwhelmed.



The classified document, seen by the Guardian, sets out the command and control structures in Whitehall for coping with a no-deal departure and says government departments will have to firefight most problems for themselves – or risk a collapse of “Operation Yellowhammer”.



.... On Thursday it emerged that the Ministry of Defence has set up a bunker underneath its main building in Whitehall to coordinate any military response to Brexit.

The moves highlight growing concern about the disruption that could be caused by a no deal – with potential shortages of everything from medicines to fresh food and toilet paper.
« Last Edit: Today at 02:04:09 AM by vox_mundi »
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« Reply #1477 on: Today at 12:22:16 AM »
UN Calls for Urgent Rethink as Resource Use Skyrockets
https://phys.org/news/2019-03-urgent-rethink-resource-skyrockets.html

Rapid growth in extraction of materials (and overpopulation) is the chief culprit in climate change and biodiversity loss – a challenge that will only worsen unless the world urgently undertakes a systemic reform of resource use, according to a report released at the UN Environment Assembly.

Global Resources Outlook 2019, prepared by the International Resource Panel, examines the trends in natural resources and their corresponding consumption patterns since the 1970s to support policymakers in strategic decision-making and transitioning to a sustainable economy.

The main conclusions of the report are:

- Resource extraction has more than tripled since 1970, including a fivefold increase in the use of non-metallic minerals and a 45 per cent increase in fossil fuel use

- By 2060, global material use could double to 190 billion tonnes (from 92 billion), while greenhouse gas emissions could increase by 43 per cent

- The extraction and processing of materials, fuels and food contribute half of total global greenhouse gas emissions and over 90 per cent of biodiversity loss and water stress

... "The Global Resources Outlook shows that we are ploughing through this planet's finite resources as if there is no tomorrow, causing climate change and biodiversity loss along the way," said Joyce Msyua, Acting Executive Director of UN Environment. "Frankly, there will be no tomorrow for many people unless we stop." 

https://wedocs.unep.org/handle/20.500.11822/27518

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Related: https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,473.msg178531.html#msg178531

The World Has Reached Peak Chicken, Peak Rice, And Peak Milk
https://www.fastcompany.com/3041927/the-world-has-reached-peak-chicken-peak-rice-and-peak-milk

We still haven’t reached peak oil. But peak milk happened in 2004, peak soybeans in 2009, and peak chicken in 2006. Rice peaked in 1988.

A new study published in Ecology and Society explains that 21 key resources that humans rely on–mostly food–have already passed their peak rate of production.

“Peak,” in this case, doesn’t mean that we’re actually producing fewer chickens or less milk yet. Instead, the researchers looked at the fact that the rate of production has plateaued, at the same time that population is increasing.

The researchers analyzed production rates over time for 27 key resources, including some fossil fuels. But while they found that nonrenewable resources like coal, oil, and gas haven’t peaked, most foods have.

Open Access: Seppelt, R., A. M. Manceur, J. Liu, E. P. Fenichel, and S. Klotz.  Synchronized peak-rate years of global resources use. Ecology and Society 19(4): 50. 2014. http://dx.doi.org/10.5751/ES-07039-190450
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late