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Author Topic: Floods  (Read 53284 times)

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Floods
« Reply #400 on: August 12, 2019, 10:07:48 PM »
A good friend of mine spent a year in Kerala, ending in mid 2018, before last year's flooding when they were still reeling from the then-current drought.  And now flooding again.  Floods like this, her Indian friends tell her, never used to happen in Kerala. 

Will the monsoon no longer feel like a relief from the drought, but be just one type of misery after a different type of misery?
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Floods
« Reply #401 on: August 13, 2019, 02:21:32 AM »
In the state of Kerala alone, at least 76 people were killed in rain-related incidents. "Several houses are still covered under 10-12 feet (3-3.6 meters) of deep mud
https://www.dw.com/en/monsoon-floods-wreak-havoc-on-india-death-toll-up/a-49987562
Louisiana seeing more floods, bigger floods:
Indeed, the average amount of rain Louisiana gets each year has increased 20 percent to 30 percent in the past 100 years, according to a 2014 climate assessment.
https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/news/weather_traffic/article_418dfcc8-b2ff-11e9-ad50-9b94c47fa8d2.html

« Last Edit: August 13, 2019, 02:31:28 AM by Tom_Mazanec »
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Floods
« Reply #402 on: August 15, 2019, 09:31:43 PM »
India floods kill more than 270, displace one million
http://news.trust.org/item/20190814105002-yyrlt/
At least 95 people were killed and more than 50 are missing in Kerala, where heavy rainfall triggered dozens of landslides last week and trapped more than 100 people.
About 190,000 people are still living in relief camps in the state, said Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan, but he added some people are returning home as flood waters recede.
In neighbouring Karnataka, home to the technology hub Bengaluru, 54 people died and 15 are missing after rivers burst their banks when authorities released water from dams.
Nearly 700,000 people have been evacuated in the state.

Multiple year descriptions of this years American flooding:
https://www.kosu.org/post/wet-wild-and-high-lakes-and-rivers-wreak-havoc-across-midwest-south
Here is from my neck of the woods, for example
For several years, it was record low water levels in the Great Lakes that were worrying people. Lake Michigan and Lake Huron reached their lowest levels ever in January 2013. Now the opposite is true. As heavy winter snows melted and joined water pouring into the lakes from rivers swollen with spring rainfall, Lakes Superior, Erie and Ontario reached unprecedented high levels this year. In early August, they were 1 to 6 inches above the monthly August record for those waterways, while Lakes Michigan and Huron were just 2 inches shy of their record water level for the month.
Joel Brammeier, president and CEO of the Alliance for the Great Lakes, says it's a natural phenomenon for the lakes to rise and fall, but this extended rise is unusual. Some attribute it, in part, to a change in climate patterns. Brammeier adds that intense storms also lead to more pollution running off into the lakes.
"In Western Lake Erie, for example, you're seeing massive blooms of algae that are sometimes toxic to people and pets that are being caused by this concentration of agricultural fertilizer washing off into Lake Erie," says Brammeier. Runoff from city streets causes pollution problems, too.

« Last Edit: August 15, 2019, 09:40:16 PM by Tom_Mazanec »
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS