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Shared Humanity

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Re: Floods
« Reply #300 on: April 12, 2019, 10:47:50 PM »
I wish people could look more clearly and see what's there. Trump is not a King Louis the XIV of France. He's just a front man who by himself makes next to no difference at all. aka Obama and all the rest. It's the people and powers behind the "throne" that really are the movers and shakers. And they are always in power no matter what.

So focusing on Trump, blathering on that he's an idiot, a jackass, or whatever is a waste of breath.

This is absolute bullshit. To suggest there is no difference between Obama and Trump is trolling at its worst.

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Re: Floods
« Reply #301 on: April 13, 2019, 12:53:27 AM »
Trump must secretly be a democrat, because he truly is a jackass.

This had better be a joke because it is truly laughable. Trump is the logical end point of the Republican Party's 5 decade long courting of racist, misogynistic, xenophobic, Christian Dominionist homophobes. The Republican Party has finally become what it has courted. Trump is the very personification of the Republican Party base.

Christ didn't teach or demonstrate racist, misogynistic, xenophobic or homophobic values. I understand the confusion because unfortunately many claiming to be Christian have taught hate. To further confuse the issue much but not all of the old testiment is a history and includes the actions of some of Gods early followers. At times those followers did the right thing at others they did the wrong thing. Christ taught and demonstrated love for all and that is what I believe true Christians aspire to.

gerontocrat

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Re: Floods
« Reply #302 on: April 13, 2019, 12:13:54 PM »
Mid-west floods.... and one of the consequences is
High Gas Prices Made Worse By Midwest Floods
https://www.forbes.com/sites/ellenrwald/2019/04/11/high-gas-prices-made-worse-by-midwest-floods/#51d782c3700f

All about ethanol. The writer at th end questions the policy of using 40% of the US corn crop for ethanol "when the future supply of corn is always unknown".
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
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"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Klondike Kat

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Re: Floods
« Reply #303 on: April 13, 2019, 01:55:49 PM »
Mid-west floods.... and one of the consequences is
High Gas Prices Made Worse By Midwest Floods
https://www.forbes.com/sites/ellenrwald/2019/04/11/high-gas-prices-made-worse-by-midwest-floods/#51d782c3700f

All about ethanol. The writer at th end questions the policy of using 40% of the US corn crop for ethanol "when the future supply of corn is always unknown".

Government subsidies and mandates have fueled the continued use of corn for biofuel.

Rodius

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Re: Floods
« Reply #304 on: April 13, 2019, 02:40:41 PM »
Mid-west floods.... and one of the consequences is
High Gas Prices Made Worse By Midwest Floods
https://www.forbes.com/sites/ellenrwald/2019/04/11/high-gas-prices-made-worse-by-midwest-floods/#51d782c3700f

All about ethanol. The writer at th end questions the policy of using 40% of the US corn crop for ethanol "when the future supply of corn is always unknown".

What a tragic waste of food.

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Floods
« Reply #305 on: April 15, 2019, 09:20:42 PM »
Here is Paul Beckwith's take on the floods:
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Floods
« Reply #306 on: April 15, 2019, 10:06:09 PM »
Michael Snyder has been writing about the collapse of the American society for years.  This is just his latest scare.  FYI, if our crops were indeed in such a dire situation, it would be reflected on their prices in the futures market.  Yet, their prices have barely budged.

Where can I check these futures, as I suspect this will be the first place to indicate if/when AGW is reaching disaster level?
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gerontocrat

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Re: Floods
« Reply #307 on: April 15, 2019, 10:53:09 PM »
Michael Snyder has been writing about the collapse of the American society for years.  This is just his latest scare.  FYI, if our crops were indeed in such a dire situation, it would be reflected on their prices in the futures market.  Yet, their prices have barely budged.

Where can I check these futures, as I suspect this will be the first place to indicate if/when AGW is reaching disaster level?
You can go to Bloomberg.com and click on commodities. Or you can go directly to the Chicago Stock market and get all sorts of data. Or just google "corn futures" and you will be awash with data.

Only one problem. Back in 2008 the stock markets were roaring up and then they fell apart. The Stock market is only a short-term indicator. The market will take account of seasonal climate outlooks as just one parameter when betting on prices for the current season's crop. It will ignore longer-term risks for future seasons as unknown knowns- e.g. over-use of the US Ogallala aquifer, collapse of the Murray-Darling Water Basin.

When the stock market through prices says there is a crisis it may be real or may be manufactured (e.g. suppliers hoarding supplies to manipulate prices). It may be permanent or it may be temporary. Klondike Kat's faith in the markets is not matched by mine.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Archimid

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Re: Floods
« Reply #308 on: April 15, 2019, 10:59:31 PM »
Where can I check these futures, as I suspect this will be the first place to indicate if/when AGW is reaching disaster level?

Futures are a good indicator of short term problems only. They will indeed show when disaster is reached but by then it will be too late to do anything about it.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

vox_mundi

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Re: Floods
« Reply #309 on: April 29, 2019, 04:03:27 AM »
Future of New Orleans in Peril as $14B Flood Protection Starts Sinking
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/after-a-14-billion-upgrade-new-orleans-levees-are-sinking/

NEW ORLEANS, La. -- The $14 billion upgrade to New Orleans’ system of levees to fortify the city is sinking, according to engineering experts. Sea-level rise and ground subsidence will render the flood barriers inadequate in just four years

After investing an amount of money that is five times greater than the gross domestic product of the island country of Aruba, the Army Corp of Engineers said levees may not be adequate enough to protect New Orleans and the surrounding region from major flooding associated with a 100-year storm.

According to the Corp, a combination of subsidence, sea level rise and weak soil is the cause behind the sinking levees. It’s now pursuing a $3 million-study with funds appropriated by Congress to figure out the severity of the problem and what it would take to lift the levees. It’s expected to be completed in 2021.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

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gerontocrat

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Re: Floods
« Reply #310 on: April 30, 2019, 12:56:16 PM »
Canada- it's your turn now.
Worth reading as it looks like at least some are thinking about long-term solutions - e.g. managed retreat from high-risk flood plains.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/apr/30/canada-flooding-quebec-montreal-justin-trudeau-climate-change
Canada: extreme floods show climate threat as experts warn of further tumult
Thousands evacuated from eastern Canada as Justin Trudeau admits urgent action necessary to improve climate preparedness
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

vox_mundi

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Re: Floods
« Reply #311 on: May 01, 2019, 08:29:22 AM »
Indonesia Is Moving Its Capital City as the Current One Sinks Into the Sea 
https://earther.gizmodo.com/indonesia-is-moving-its-capital-city-as-the-current-one-1834420363

For as long as Indonesia has existed—even during colonial times—Jakarta has been its capital. But the 10 million-strong coastal city that sits on the northern coast of Java will soon lose that title, thanks to some serious infrastructural and environmental challenges.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo decided Monday after a cabinet meeting to push forward on this long-anticipated plan, reports the Jakarta Post
. The idea of moving the capital city stretches to the country’s first president, Sukarno, in 1945 after it gained independence from the Dutch. It’s finally becoming reality as the city’s reached a tipping point with congestion, air pollution, and, well, climate change.

The city, parts of which are already below sea level, has sunk 13 feet in the past 30 years, according to Reuters. The highly vulnerable city could be permanently flooded by 2050 as sea levels are expected to rise at least 20 inches and potentially even 5 feet by some estimates, according to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands. Along with sea level rise, the pulling groundwater for human use has reduced the region’s elevation, as the ground can compacts or shrinks when there’s less water running through it, as the Asean Post has noted.

-----------------------

Rounds of Rain, SevereThunderstorms to Raise Flood Rsk in Central US this Week 
https://accuweather.com/en/weather-news/rounds-of-rain-severe-thunderstorms-to-raise-flood-risk-in-central-us-this-week/70008131

--------------------------

Downtown Davenport, Iowa Floods After Temporary Levees Fail
https://earther.gizmodo.com/downtown-davenport-iowa-floods-after-temporary-levees-1834434835

Downtown Davenport, Iowa flooded after HESCO barriers in the region failed sometime around 3:30 p.m. local time as the Mississippi River rose to nearly 22 feet.

... Scott County Emergency Management Director David Donovan told Weather.com that The temporary flood protection levee that they put in place failed this afternoon and it’s inundating a portion of downtown Davenport” spanning about four blocks. He added that water had reached six feet in some areas, with fire rescue crews going door to door and local businesses forced to shutter.

... As the Des Moines Register noted, Iowa has already been seriously affected by flooding this year (including the so-called “bomb cyclone” that swept across the central U.S. in March) and concerns about Mississippi River levels “driven by snowmelt and heavy rain, has been high for weeks, but the danger spiked again this week after easing somewhat earlier in April.” The river is expected to crest at 22.3 feet at the Rock Island, Illinois, Lock and Dam on Wednesday afternoon, just short of the 22.63 record in July 1993, the paper added.

“This is exactly what ’93 looked like,” WQAD-TV meteorologist Eric Sorensen said, according to the Register.


... “Wednesday marks the 39th day of continuous flooding here,” making this the longest flood on record.

“Because so much of the Midwest experienced heavy rain last fall, followed by the wettest winter on record, the soils remain saturated over a wide area,” Weather.com meteorologist Bob Henson wrote. “It won’t take a great deal of rain to trigger additional flooding as the spring unfolds.”
« Last Edit: May 03, 2019, 04:43:54 AM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

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Re: Floods
« Reply #312 on: May 03, 2019, 04:48:49 AM »
Mississippi Sets All-Time Record, Worse Than “Great Flood of ’93”   
https://wqad.com/2019/05/02/mississippi-sets-all-time-record-worse-than-great-flood-of-93/amp/

This morning, close to an inch of rain fell on the river basin, officially pushing the level of the Mississippi River over the previous all-time high. That was set on July 9, 1993 during the "Great Flood of 1993" when much of the Mississippi River was flooded from Minnesota, all the way down to the Gulf of Mexico due to heavy rainfall. On that date, the official height of the flood gauge at Rock Island achieved 22.63 feet.

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

bbr2314

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Re: Floods
« Reply #313 on: May 08, 2019, 01:05:00 AM »
The models are now unanimous in forecasting very heavy rains across the South-Central states. As-is, the Mississippi is already expected to approach record levels in Baton Rouge.

https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/hydrograph.php?wfo=lix&gage=btrl1

The recent record is 45' set in 2011.


Sigmetnow

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Re: Floods
« Reply #314 on: May 08, 2019, 01:26:20 PM »
May 7. Storms in south-central U.S.

Flash Flooding Inundates Houston Area as Storms Spawn Heavy Rain, Tornadoes Across Plains
Quote
As much as 15 inches of rain fell in Humble, northeast of Houston, according to radar estimates. As much as 3.5 inches of rain an hour was estimated in some areas.

All major roads in the city of Sugar Land were impassable. Fort Bend County, where Sugar Land is located, declared a local state of disaster. City spokesman Doug Adolph told The Weather Channel that rainfall surpassed the city's storm drain capacity.

“We’re seeing conditions that are far worse than what we experienced during Hurricane Harvey,” Adolph said.
...
Tornadoes and baseball-size hail were reported in the Texas Panhandle. There were no immediate reports of damages or injury. A tornado was spotted in Tulia, Texas, just after 6 p.m. local time. ...
https://weather.com/news/news/2019-05-07-storms-flash-flooding-tornadoes-impacts
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vox_mundi

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Re: Floods
« Reply #315 on: May 10, 2019, 01:38:17 AM »
Officials seek to open major spillway on Mississippi River 
https://phys.org/news/2019-05-major-spillway-mississippi-river.html



Army Corps of Engineers officials in Louisiana aim to open a historic flood control structure above New Orleans on Tuesday for an unprecedented second time in one year.

... Continued rains in the Midwest and Ohio Valley and floodwaters from the upper Mississippi River are heading down the Mississippi, National Weather Service hydrologist Jeffrey Graschel said. In addition, he noted, storms are expected to dump 5 to 10 inches (13 to 25 centimeters) of rain in parts of Louisiana and Arkansas.

The Bonnet Carré Spillway gets opened to relieve stress on New Orleans levees when the Mississippi flows at 1.25 million cubic feet (35,400 cubic meters) per second—fast enough to fill the Empire State Building in 30 seconds.

"The risks in not operating the spillway as it is designed ... would be potentially catastrophic," corps spokesman Ricky Boyett said.

... Moby Solangi, director of the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies in Gulfport, Mississippi, said he's concerned about the spillway opening, because it means that polluted fresh water will flow into Mississippi Sound, a nursery for dolphins and endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtles.

More of those animals died in April than in any April over the past five years, he said, with 28 dolphins and 57 sea turtles found dead. Solangi said many of the dolphins had lesions on their bodies from exposure to fresh water, which also damages oyster reefs and blue crabs, on which the turtles feed, and plants that are food for animals lower on the food chain.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Floods
« Reply #316 on: May 10, 2019, 02:10:22 AM »
The answer is probably no, but is it possible that the Atchafalaya could become the new Mississippi outlet with all this flooding?
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vox_mundi

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Re: Floods
« Reply #317 on: May 10, 2019, 03:02:24 AM »
It appears that they're only diverting 15-20% of the main flow, which the diversion is able to handle; so probably no.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

J Cartmill

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Re: Floods
« Reply #318 on: May 10, 2019, 03:30:15 AM »
There is also the Morganza spillway they can open.
There was a threat of of the Mississippi changing course in 1973, they had to shore up the Old River Control structure with a special concrete that could harden underwater.
Nice article here
https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/americas-achilles-heel-the-mississippi-rivers-old-river-control-st.html
« Last Edit: May 10, 2019, 03:36:38 AM by J Cartmill »

Sigmetnow

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Re: Floods
« Reply #319 on: May 12, 2019, 04:58:41 PM »
Bonnet Carré spillway opened.

Louisiana Declares Statewide Emergency as Mississippi River Rises; Train Derails in Mississippi
Quote
In an effort to relieve stress on New Orleans levees, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers opened the Bonnet Carré spillway about 28 miles north of the city on Friday.

The opening marks the first time the spillway has been used twice in a single year and only the 14th time it has been opened since it was built in the aftermath of a historic flood that swamped New Orleans in 1927.

The Corps had decided on Thursday to open the spillway next week, but changed the timeline due to high amounts of rainfall.

“Regional rainfall caused the Mississippi River to rise 6 inches in the past 24 hours with more rain expected through the weekend,” Corps spokesman Matt Roe said in a press release. “These rains could elevate the Mississippi River above 17 feet with a peak as high as 17.5 feet at the Carrollton Gage. In an abundance of caution the operation date is being moved forward to ensure the safe passage of this high water by limiting the elevations downriver of the spillway.”
https://weather.com/news/news/2019-05-10-texas-louisiana-houston-flooding-storms-heavy-rain
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vox_mundi

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Re: Floods
« Reply #320 on: May 13, 2019, 05:28:01 PM »
Researchers Find Patterns Associated with Extreme Floods
https://phys.org/news/2019-05-patterns-extreme.html

Extreme floods across the continental United States are associated with four broad atmospheric patterns, a machine-learning based analysis of extreme floods found.

Researchers analyzed relatively rare floods in the United States, using a machine-learning algorithm to place the floods into groups based on atmospheric patterns that happen at the same time. They found that tropical moisture exports, tropical cyclones, low-pressure systems and melting snow are the primary patterns associated with extreme floods.

"This is the first time that atmospheric patterns have been linked to extreme floods in an automated fashion at the continental scale," Moradkhani said.

... The researchers developed an interactive website with detailed information about extreme floods across the continental U.S.

"Knowing where extreme floods tend to occur at the same time over a large region highlights where it would be beneficial to design flood control structures that account for both the regular flood season and an extreme flood season that occurs at a different time of year," Moradkhani said.

"The website is open for anyone to access, and we hope it will be widely used by a variety of agencies and individuals," Moradkhani said.

https://kschlef.shinyapps.io/ExtremeFloods/



Open Access: Katherine E. Schlef et al. Atmospheric Circulation Patterns Associated with Extreme United States Floods Identified via Machine Learning, Scientific Reports (2019)
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

gerontocrat

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Re: Floods
« Reply #321 on: May 23, 2019, 11:16:49 AM »
The floods in the Mississippi catchment area are very long-lasting and severe this year.
Trouble is we only see the headlines about an event or events, and tend to forget the long-term impacts. 
E.g
https://weather.com/safety/floods/news/2019-05-21-plains-flooding-increasing-river-gauges-in-flood
Quote
At a Glance
-Flooding rain in parts of the Plains is the latest round of a siege of heavy rain events this spring.
-Earlier this month, torrential rain triggered serious flooding in parts of Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi.
-Flooding in the Mississippi Valley and northern Plains also continues from heavy spring rain and earlier snowmelt.
-Taken together, almost 400 locations could be above flood stage by later this week
.

https://www.eenews.net/stories/1060362841
Floods prompt scrutiny of Missouri River dams and levees

Quote
The Army Corps of Engineers is looking into strengthening flood control along the Missouri River in response to the record deluge this spring and criticism that the agency is not doing enough to protect communities.

The Army Corps is considering realigning its levees along the Missouri and expanding or building new systems such as floodways, easements and retention basins to capture more floodwater, Maj. Gen. Scott Spellmon, the agency's deputy commanding general for civil and emergency operations, said in an email to E&E News.

"Levee realignment" involves moving and reshaping levees so they better control rising waters. Building or expanding other flood controls would involve working with communities to find and access land.

The Army Corps also is working with Congress and the administration to get money and the authority to study "how we can better improve flood control on the lower basin" of the Missouri, which has been heavily flooded since mid-March, Spellmon said.

"Our intent would be to outline the alternatives, seek public comment and take those recommendations to the administration and Congress for consideration," he said.

Republicans and Democrats in Congress have pressed the Army Corps in recent weeks to better protect communities along the Missouri — the nation's longest river — particularly in the heavily flooded states of Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa and Missouri.

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) criticized the agency for not prioritizing flood control over its other river-management goals such as protecting fish and wildlife, generating hydropower, and promoting commerce and recreation. Congress requires the Army Corps to consider eight factors, including flood control, without prioritizing any of them except during a major flood, when the Army Corps emphasizes protecting life and property.

"The No. 1 priority of the Corps should be flood control, period," Grassley said at a Senate hearing April 17 in Glenwood, Iowa, a city of 5,300 people that was nearly covered in floodwater in early April.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

bligh8

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Re: Floods
« Reply #322 on: May 24, 2019, 03:32:34 PM »
I read an article yesterday that said that 66 of the 70some counties in Oklahoma had been declared a disaster zone.  These rain fall patterns will never get better over any given period of time only worse.  The spring rains will come sooner, last longer and be more robust.  We seem to not have the ability or resources or will to deal with these events and our current infrastructure is woefully inadequate. Imagine if the home pictured in the above post was your home.  Real estate adds still read "River living...slow and easy"   

gerontocrat

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Re: Floods
« Reply #323 on: May 27, 2019, 04:17:13 PM »
USA floods - the story continues...

https://www.wunderground.com/news/storms/severe/news/2019-05-23-severe-thunderstorms-tornadoes-flash-flooding-plains-midwest
Severe Weather, Flash Flood Saga Continues Memorial Day From the Midwest into the Plains
Quote
Rainfall Forecast
At least three locations have set new river crest records from this siege of heavy rain:
-Avant, Oklahoma (Bird Creek), topped its previous record from March 11, 1974.
-Near Ponca City, Oklahoma (Arkansas River), topped its previous record from May 14, 1993.
-Van Buren, Arkansas (Arkansas River), topped its previous record from April 16, 1945.
This extended siege could eventually lead to more record-breaking river flooding lasting into early June in some places, particularly along the Arkansas River in northwestern Arkansas, where levels are expected to top records standing from 1927 or the 1940s upstream from Little Rock.
NWS-Little Rock tweeted Sunday night this historic flooding could lead to levee overtopping with significant impacts that could last well into the summer.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Juan C. García

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Re: Floods
« Reply #324 on: May 27, 2019, 06:43:29 PM »
We seem to not have the ability or and resources or and specially will to deal with these events and our current infrastructure is woefully inadequate.
:-\
Which is the best answer to Sep-2012 ASI lost (compared to 1979-2000)?
50% [NSIDC Extent] or
73% [PIOMAS Volume]

Volume is harder to measure than extent, but 3-dimensional space is real, 2D's hide ~50% thickness gone.
-> IPCC/NSIDC trends [based on extent] underestimate the real speed of ASI lost.

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Floods
« Reply #325 on: May 30, 2019, 01:04:39 AM »
« Last Edit: May 30, 2019, 01:37:36 PM by Tom_Mazanec »
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Alexander555

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Re: Floods
« Reply #326 on: May 31, 2019, 07:33:57 PM »

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Floods
« Reply #327 on: May 31, 2019, 07:57:53 PM »
Today i learned about the Old River Control Structure

Quote
Could Mississippi River change course? New research raises question, but Corps says plan working
https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/news/environment/article_d5a29f26-06a9-11e8-abde-8b9660c81021.html

Anyone having insight here in the context of all this rain?

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Floods
« Reply #328 on: May 31, 2019, 08:26:08 PM »
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Floods
« Reply #329 on: May 31, 2019, 08:31:44 PM »
Thanks, Tor. Is pocketed. :)

gerontocrat

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Re: Floods
« Reply #330 on: May 31, 2019, 10:02:38 PM »
Today i learned about the Old River Control Structure

Quote
Could Mississippi River change course? New research raises question, but Corps says plan working

Anyone having insight here in the context of all this rain?
The only insight I can give is Murphy's law... "Whatever can go wrong, will go wrong"

and its corollary... "Everything can go wrong".

and from http://bluebox.ippt.pan.pl/~vkoval/vk_files/funny/Murphy.pdf
O'Toole's Commentary - "Murphy was an optimist".
____________________________________________________________
I claim this was nicked - from me. Many, many years ago I was in in a bar somewhere (might have been the British Club in Port Moresby) while working on a totally crap project. After a few beers a story just arrived in my head - complete and ready to tell. It was all about O'Toole's  trials and tribulations over many years while studying Murphy's Law for his Ph. D. thesis. And he finally submitted it - just 4 words, but the appendices were enormous.

"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

be cause

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Re: Floods
« Reply #331 on: June 01, 2019, 12:21:36 AM »
 I live in what was once the small kingdom of the northern Murphys from @ 750 - 1350 AD. Then they were chased by the O'Neill for being too disruptive .. :) b.c.
2007 + 5 = 2012 + 4 = 2016 + 3 = 2019 ...

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Floods
« Reply #332 on: June 01, 2019, 07:34:40 AM »
Thank you Gerontocrat, i always appreciate a good use of Murphy's law. Pretty scary stuff.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Floods
« Reply #333 on: June 01, 2019, 02:05:41 PM »
Arkansas

Quote
Brian Emfinger (@brianemfinger) 5/31/19, 2:57 PM
A little more video this morning showing the Dardanelle Levee Breach and active enlargement of the breach as pieces of levee fall away into the river! #arwx #flooding
https://twitter.com/brianemfinger/status/1134534393740107776
Image below. 1-Minute video at the link
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Floods
« Reply #334 on: June 01, 2019, 03:19:10 PM »
« Last Edit: June 01, 2019, 03:53:52 PM by Tom_Mazanec »
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Shared Humanity

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Re: Floods
« Reply #335 on: June 01, 2019, 03:27:15 PM »
First week of June to be heavy rain southern plain:
https://twitter.com/NWSWPC/status/1134518586330849280

Can everyone say "stuck weather patterns"?


vox_mundi

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Re: Floods
« Reply #337 on: June 09, 2019, 03:35:32 AM »
Mississippi Seeks Seafood Disaster Declaration Amid Spillway Complaints 
https://phys.org/news/2019-06-mississippi-seafood-disaster-spillway-complaints.html

Mississippi's governor wants the federal government to declare a fisheries disaster as freshwater from a Mississippi River spillway gushes into what's normally a partly salty estuary, killing countless oysters and crabs.   

...  Gov. Phil Bryant announced Friday that he had made the request, releasing a May 31 letter to U.S Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross.

Bryant says 70% of the Mississippi Sound's already imperiled oyster population is estimated to be dead, with the crab catch down by 35%. He also noted that shrimp season would normally be getting underway in June.


"The large releases of freshwater from the actions of the spillway inundate the saltwater of the Mississippi Sound and greatly disrupts the unique ecosystem, and subsequently, all sea life of this region," the Republican Bryant wrote to Ross

... This year's months-long flood along the Mississippi led the Corps to open the spillway for an unprecedented second time, after already opening and closing it once before. Salinity levels in the sound are normally about 18-22 parts per thousand, about half the saltiness in deeper parts of the Gulf of Mexico. But Friday, the highest salinity level of any reporting station in the sound was 7.6 parts per thousand.

That's especially bad for oysters and other plants and animals anchored to a particular spot. Mississippi's oyster industry has been in steep decline because of repeated freshwater inundations and other problems. ... a heavy dose of freshwater in late spring and early summer could be especially bad. That's when plants and animals in the shallows atop the continental shelf are normally bulking up at the beginning of a new growing season. Graham said that with normal summer winds from the south, the giant shield of freshwater could linger all summer in the Mississippi Sound. The only thing likely to break it up would be a tropical storm.

"You're really talking about a prolonged event that's happening at the wrong time for productivity on the shelf," Graham said. "There likely will be a cascading ecological effect that will continue through next spring or longer."
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Tom_Mazanec

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« Last Edit: June 11, 2019, 07:11:39 PM by Tom_Mazanec »
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS


Alexander555

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Re: Floods
« Reply #340 on: June 14, 2019, 08:43:13 PM »
More than 60 people died in the floods so far, and 3,7 million hectares of farmland damaged. https://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2019/06/13/world/asia/13reuters-china-weather.html

Carex

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Re: Floods
« Reply #341 on: June 15, 2019, 03:45:10 AM »
Flood? Maybe not, but the Great Lakes are rather high too.

https://www.glerl.noaa.gov/data/wlevels/data/superiorLevelsFeet.png


bbr2314

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Re: Floods
« Reply #342 on: June 15, 2019, 03:51:47 AM »
Flood? Maybe not, but the Great Lakes are rather high too.

https://www.glerl.noaa.gov/data/wlevels/data/superiorLevelsFeet.png


I wonder what happens if we see the same year over year increase into 2020. I would imagine the impacts would be fairly catastrophic in many locations.

Carex

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Re: Floods
« Reply #343 on: June 15, 2019, 03:59:13 AM »
This is an all time high for Lake Erie.


And Lake Ontario


The big lakes upsteam usually don't reach full pool until later in the year.

Carex

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Re: Floods
« Reply #344 on: June 15, 2019, 04:13:36 AM »
RE#342:   

The Lakes are quite dynamic. L. Superior was within 0.1 foot of record low in 2004 and L. Michigan was low enough to restrict shipping as recent as 2006.  Still people build as close as they can and light to moderate damage is happening during storms now.

bligh8

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Re: Floods
« Reply #345 on: June 15, 2019, 02:15:55 PM »
 Still people build as close as they can and light to moderate damage is happening during storms now.

It use to be the ice that scared folks.....60yrs ago I recall watching as folks set-off charges in the ice before the ice destroyed the lake side portion of their homes. 

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Floods
« Reply #346 on: June 15, 2019, 08:50:29 PM »
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS