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johnm33

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #350 on: June 16, 2019, 11:58:00 PM »
Shit Zizek have you been reading Farakhan? or dipping into unz?

nanning

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #351 on: June 17, 2019, 06:20:48 AM »
Milk the poor. Quite vampiric.

"Roughly 70 to 80 percent of global plasma supply is provided by paid donors from the United States, which, unlike the United Kingdom and other developed nations, does not ban the practice of paying donors for their blood. The United States also has fewer restrictions on how often someone can donate plasma, with donors permitted to undergo the process twice a week, every week, all year long."

"plasma donation companies are “surgically placing” donation centers in destitute neighborhoods."

"Significant numbers of donors...would not be able to afford the lifesaving therapies created by their own plasma contributions."

" as little as $30 to $50 for a donation that can be sold for $300 on the wholesale market"

" I’m well aware that I’m getting ripped off for this, but money is money. "

" the simple fact that they’re taking your immune system"

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2019/05/28/plas-m28.html

sidd

I find that sickening.
The list of what is considered a resource keeps growing. With other humans seen as a resource such as for plasma and organs, the strange thing is it is only poor humans that are the resource. Not all humans.

Resources: Earths minerals, living nature, other human tribes, children, moneypoor humans, healthpoor humans, highIQ humans, production unit humans.

Only what's innocent, non-violent or vulnerable is a resource!


What's not a resource? The rich people:
The people that control the violence throughout history. The conquerors. Extract & Plunder. More more.

You really have to change THEM if you want anything to change about AGW mitigation and societal change.

@zizek
Great synopsis I think. Well said.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly"

bligh8

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #352 on: June 20, 2019, 03:50:13 AM »
Global warming has increased global economic inequality
Noah S. Diffenbaugh and Marshall Burke

PNAS May 14, 2019 116 (20) 9808-9813; first published April 22, 2019 https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1816020116

"Significance
We find that global warming has very likely exacerbated global economic inequality, including ∼25% increase in population-weighted between-country inequality over the past half century. This increase results from the impact of warming on annual economic growth, which over the course of decades has accumulated robust and substantial declines in economic output in hotter, poorer countries—and increases in many cooler, wealthier countries—relative to a world without anthropogenic warming. Thus, the global warming caused by fossil fuel use has likely exacerbated the economic inequality associated with historical disparities in energy consumption. Our results suggest that low-carbon energy sources have the potential to provide a substantial secondary development benefit, in addition to the primary benefits of increased energy access."

Abstract
Understanding the causes of economic inequality is critical for achieving equitable economic development. To investigate whether global warming has affected the recent evolution of inequality, we combine counterfactual historical temperature trajectories from a suite of global climate models with extensively replicated empirical evidence of the relationship between historical temperature fluctuations and economic growth. Together, these allow us to generate probabilistic country-level estimates of the influence of anthropogenic climate forcing on historical economic output. We find very high likelihood that anthropogenic climate forcing has increased economic inequality between countries. For example, per capita gross domestic product (GDP) has been reduced 17–31% at the poorest four deciles of the population-weighted country-level per capita GDP distribution, yielding a ratio between the top and bottom deciles that is 25% larger than in a world without global warming. As a result, although between-country inequality has decreased over the past half century, there is ∼90% likelihood that global warming has slowed that decrease. The primary driver is the parabolic relationship between temperature and economic growth, with warming increasing growth in cool countries and decreasing growth in warm countries. Although there is uncertainty in whether historical warming has benefited some temperate, rich countries, for most poor countries there is >90% likelihood that per capita GDP is lower today than if global warming had not occurred. Thus, our results show that, in addition to not sharing equally in the direct benefits of fossil fuel use, many poor countries have been significantly harmed by the warming arising from wealthy countries’ energy consumption."

"The impact of historical warming on economic inequality is of particular concern (2). There is growing evidence that poorer countries or individuals are more negatively affected by a changing climate, either because they lack the resources for climate protection (3) or because they tend to reside in warmer regions where additional warming would be detrimental to both productivity and health."

"Recent research has identified pathways by which changes in climate can affect the fundamental building blocks of economic production (11, 12). Empirical work has included sector-specific analyses of agriculture, labor productivity, and human health (12), as well as analyses of aggregate indicators such as gross domestic product (GDP) (4, 13)."

"Here, we build on past work linking economic growth and fluctuations in temperature (4, 14) to quantify the impact of historical anthropogenic climate forcing on the global distribution of country-level per capita GDP (Materials and Methods and Fig. 1). We use the Historical and Natural climate model simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) (20) to quantify the temperature trajectory of different countries in the absence of anthropogenic forcing. We then combine these counterfactual country-level temperature trajectories with empirically derived nonlinear temperature–GDP response functions to calculate the counterfactual per capita GDP of individual countries over the past half century. Finally, we use those counterfactual country-level economic trajectories to calculate the impact of historical anthropogenic forcing on population-weighted country-level economic inequality, accounting for both uncertainty in the relationship between temperature and economic growth and uncertainty in the climate response to historical forcing."

More within the open access paper....




































sidd

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #354 on: June 24, 2019, 09:47:32 PM »
Chicago: The city with broad shoulders, where rich,white people live 30 years longer than poor, black people.

"In predominantly white Streeterville, Chicagoans can expect to live to 90. In Englewood, where the population is virtually all black, life expectancy is just 60."

"The median income in Streeterville is nearly $100,000 a year, according to the US census. In Englewood, smack dab in the center of Chicago’s Southside, it’s a quarter of that. "

“Irreversible brain damage just because of where you live, and you’re too poor to go anywhere else? It’s not fair. You’re cheating kids,”

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/jun/23/chicago-latest-news-life-expectancy-rich-poor-inequality

sidd

vox_mundi

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #355 on: June 25, 2019, 06:07:26 PM »
‘Climate Apartheid’: UN Expert Says Human Rights May Not Survive
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/jun/25/climate-apartheid-united-nations-expert-says-human-rights-may-not-survive-crisis
 

The world is increasingly at risk of “climate apartheid”, where the rich pay to escape heat and hunger caused by the escalating climate crisis while the rest of the world suffers, a report from a UN human rights expert has said.

Philip Alston, UN special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, said the impacts of global heating are likely to undermine not only basic rights to life, water, food, and housing for hundreds of millions of people, but also democracy and the rule of law... “Human rights might not survive the coming upheaval.”


Climate change threatens to undo the last 50 years of progress in development, global health, and poverty reduction,” Alston said. “It could push more than 120 million more people into poverty by 2030 and will have the most severe impact in poor countries, regions, and the places poor people live and work.”

Even the unrealistic best-case scenario of 1.5°C of warming by 2100 will see extreme temperatures in many regions and leave disadvantaged populations with food insecurity, lost incomes, and worse health. Many will have to choose between starvation and migration.

Quote
... “We risk a ‘climate apartheid’ scenario where the wealthy pay to escape overheating, hunger, and conflict while the rest of the world is left to suffer.”

... The report also condemns Donald Trump for “actively silencing” climate science, and criticises the Brazilian president, Jair Bolsonaro, for promising to open up the Amazon rainforest to mining. But Alston said there were also some positive developments, including legal cases against states and fossil fuel companies, the activism of Greta Thunberg and the worldwide school strikes, and Extinction Rebellion.

“When Hurricane Sandy wreaked havoc on New York in 2012, stranding low-income and vulnerable New Yorkers without access to power and healthcare, the Goldman Sachs headquarters was protected by tens of thousands of its own sandbags and power from its generator.”

https://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=24735&LangID=E
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #356 on: June 25, 2019, 06:21:14 PM »
He should look at American or European concentration camps. He might fund with surprise that human rights may already have died.

Or perhaps a look at the things happening in the Mediterranean sea? Or asked the dude who was prosecuted for leaving water in the desert so people wouldn't die of thirst.

Or, or, or...

Human rights available for Arians on this planet.

sidd

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #357 on: June 26, 2019, 09:03:46 AM »

TerryM

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #358 on: June 26, 2019, 11:43:15 AM »
Kill the poor: they don't deserve health care, right ?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/the-clinic-of-last-resort/2019/06/22/2833c8a0-92cc-11e9-aadb-74e6b2b46f6a_story.html

sidd

The poor have their place.
If we didn't have the poor to despise, we might begin despising each other!  :(
Terry

nanning

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #359 on: June 26, 2019, 12:11:06 PM »
I am poor by choice. I don't belong to 'we'. I understand that 'we' are the problem. My conscience is clear.
You were sarcastic, right Terry?
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly"

kassy

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #360 on: June 26, 2019, 03:21:50 PM »
Of course he is.

An interesting observation is that 'we' are not poor. I guess this is true for ASIF averaged.
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

nanning

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #361 on: June 26, 2019, 04:16:44 PM »
Completely agree kassy, a correct and significant observation I think.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly"

magnamentis

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #362 on: June 26, 2019, 05:05:52 PM »
the real wealth and the only wealth that can make and keep us "content" "happy" you name it, is inside us and modesty plays a big part in it.

we can like or wish many things, the question is whether we believe that we "need" them or if we think on a "nice to have" basis.

"Neediness" as well as the urge to impress the rest of the world (and harvest envy) are main ingredients to make humans unhappy/discontent and join and get trapped in the sickening
"Hamster Wheel"

sidd

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #363 on: June 26, 2019, 07:47:31 PM »
Gogol once wrote a book about profiting off dead souls. Here is a late stage capitalism, more macabre version:

"doctors told her that Archie, the man she had been married to for almost five decades, wouldn't make it."

"had never planned a funeral before"

"a bill of over $7,000"

"The cost of Archie's cremation — $3,295 — was more than twice the amount charged elsewhere in Jacksonville by the company"

"most funeral businesses have websites, most omit prices from the sites"

"NPR reporters also found it difficult to get prices"

"federal regulators routinely find the homes violating a law that requires price disclosures"

"Archie didn't have hardly very much life insurance — maybe 5,000 — and I had, you know, a little bit of money in the bank, and it took everything"

"It took me as a longtime lawyer and a professional consumer advocate literally an eight-hour day just to get a solid list of what funeral services were offered by nearby funeral establishments and how much they cost."

"federal regulators shopping undercover have found about 1 in 4 funeral homes break the rule and fail to disclose price information"

https://www.npr.org/2017/02/07/504020003/a-funeral-may-cost-you-thousands-less-just-by-crossing-the-street
https://www.npr.org/2017/02/08/504031472/despite-decades-old-law-funeral-prices-are-still-unclear

sidd

SteveMDFP

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #364 on: June 26, 2019, 08:24:45 PM »
Gogol once wrote a book about profiting off dead souls. Here is a late stage capitalism, more macabre version:

"doctors told her that Archie, the man she had been married to for almost five decades, wouldn't make it."

"had never planned a funeral before"

"a bill of over $7,000"

"The cost of Archie's cremation — $3,295 — was more than twice the amount charged elsewhere in Jacksonville by the company"
The funeral business is an abomination.

A better way, from my experience, is to arrange to "donate the body to science."  Details vary by state in the US.  Here, arrangements must be made by the deceased while still competent to do so (in advance, of course).

Typically, the body will be picked up, used for teaching and/or research and/or organ donation, then the remainder of the remains are cremated and either delivered to the family or interred at a specific, dedicated cemetery site.  Usually zero cost.  The family can hold a memorial service of their choice, if desired.  A good restaurant or bar might be nice, and far more affordable.

sidd

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #365 on: June 26, 2019, 09:22:07 PM »
Re: donate bodies to science

In Ohio, bodies are piling up so fast, they are being stored in refrigerated trailers. Ohio State Med center is routinely turning down donation applications.

Opioids. The gift that will keep on giving.

sidd

sidd

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #366 on: June 26, 2019, 09:23:18 PM »
An appropriate song for the topic:



sidd

TerryM

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #367 on: June 27, 2019, 02:38:38 AM »
Of course he is.

Thanks Kassy
I've been away for some time and didn't consider that to some I'm a totally new voice. One that really should have used the sarc/ tag.
Sorry for the confusion nanning, my bad. :-[


Quote
An interesting observation is that 'we' are not poor. I guess this is true for ASIF averaged.


I doubt that any of us would qualify as "poor" on a world wide basis, though few of us could afford even a modest home in Vancouver, San Francisco or Hong Kong.  ???


Terry


nanning

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #368 on: June 27, 2019, 03:43:49 AM »
Quote
I doubt that any of us would qualify as "poor" on a world wide basis

Not to make it an important point but sorry Terry, I disagree with this.
I think I am not only not in the world's 10% richest, as most on this forum will likely be, but I think I am in the world's 10% poorest (I could be wrong). Not by daily budget because that must be indexed; e.g. food over here is much more expensive than in a poor country. I have hardly any possessions, just like most teenagers, and since recent moving from Amsterdam to a rural town my bankaccount is -ve and it'll take years to get +ve again. If my old fridge breaks down I cannot replace it. Without work (>50yo? then no jobs) I feel trapped in the benefits system, which luckily in the Netherlands is not as bad as e.g. in the UK, the 'hostile environment'. I live very basic and frugal, no wealth, no affluence. I don't need more.

Some relevant articles about western poor people suicides (I am not suicidal btw):
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/sep/21/fit-for-work-assessment-was-trigger-for-suicide-coroner-says
https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/may/13/suicides-of-benefit-claimants-reveal-dwp-flaws-says-inquiry
https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/dec/03/aggressive-debt-collectors-raise-risk-of-suicide
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-08-mass-layoffs-linked-teen-suicide.html
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly"

sidd

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #369 on: June 27, 2019, 07:06:22 AM »
Re: bottom 10%

1) by income: you make less than 480 USD/yr

https://ourworldindata.org/global-economic-inequality

2) by wealth: this is weird. The poorest are in India, USA (?!), Bangladesh,Pakistan,Nigeria

" if you’re looking for the poorest 10% of the world’s population, you’ll find 16.4% of them in India, and another 4.4% in Bangladesh. Pakistan has 2.6% of the world’s bottom 10%, while Nigeria has 3.9%.

But there’s one unlikely country which has a whopping 7.5% of the poorest of the poor — second only to India. That country? The United States."

"if you add up the net worth of the world’s bottom decile, it comes to minus a trillion dollars. The poorest people in the world, using the Credit Suisse methodology, aren’t in India or Pakistan or Bangladesh: they’re people like Jérôme Kerviel, who has a negative net worth of something in the region of $6 billion."

"if you take the bottom 30% of the world’s population — the poorest 2 billion people in the world — their total aggregate net worth is not low, it’s not zero, it’s negative. "

http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2014/04/04/stop-adding-up-the-wealth-of-the-poor/

the 2018 report from credit suisse (he talks about 2013)  is at

https://www.credit-suisse.com/media/assets/corporate/docs/about-us/research/publications/global-wealth-databook-2018.pdf

The numbers are similar.

sidd
« Last Edit: June 27, 2019, 07:48:54 AM by sidd »

nanning

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #370 on: June 27, 2019, 08:28:48 AM »
Thanks sidd, a shocking economic inequality contrast in the USA. Wow. Going by the federal policy, it is never enough, rich people 'deserve' a lower tax.Voilà

From the reuters article:
Quote
The answer is that it comes from a pair of tables in Credit Suisse’s 2013 Global Wealth Databook. First of all, you have to find the total wealth in the world, which you can find at the bottom of the fourth column on page 89: it’s $241 trillion.
AHAA,  241.000.000.000.000 dollarrrs (ca. $32000 per Earth capita, to wit = -12x my personal 'wealth')

Nice to 'know' how much wealth (affluence) our hamster wheel produced for the rich since the age of enlightenment. The results of our total labour. 'We' should better stop with this hamster wheel, what's the point?
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly"

nanning

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #371 on: June 29, 2019, 11:23:57 AM »
Hypothesis:

These overlapping terms:
    Taking more than you need,
    Affluence,
    Wealth,
    Accumulation of objects,

all start with trade & markets.  These make it possible to have the concept of 'rich' and ownership. This leads to social stratification, leading to social hierarchy and inheritance. Here the concept of 'poor' is born. And winners & losers, profit, economic inequality.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly"

Ranman99

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #372 on: June 29, 2019, 11:31:56 AM »
I thought it all started during the early days of agriculture (and domestication) when a few would begin to store "lock up" the food.
Randy Fitton

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #373 on: June 29, 2019, 11:54:24 AM »
Hypothesis:

What are markets without currency?

It's not markets what you are interested in i think. You want to look into currency.

johnm33

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #374 on: June 29, 2019, 01:13:17 PM »
nanning, you may be interested in what Ellen Brown has to say, her blog https://ellenbrown.com/

nanning

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #375 on: June 29, 2019, 03:49:24 PM »
I should have added the context, sorry.

I agree with you Ranman99, concerning the culture we are in. We are civilisation (ahem). I meant another situation.

The hypothesis is about peaceful nature tribes that came in contact with the kind of trade I mean: The trade of the expanding mediterranean tribes. So I mean a period after the mediterranean tribes invented agriculture and settled. Say, for example, the Germanic peaceful nature tribes, 2000BC-0BC.

@b_lumenkraft The currency will be whatever the expanding tribes use. First skins, clothes, ropes? I think initially is wasn't tokens or money because those Germanic tribes had no use for it at first. I don't know many details, but later on came tokens, money and the rest of my hypothesis.
Thank you all for engaging.

I'll read your link johnm33, thanks.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly"

TerryM

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #376 on: July 01, 2019, 02:43:51 PM »
I should have added the context, sorry.

I agree with you Ranman99, concerning the culture we are in. We are civilisation (ahem). I meant another situation.

The hypothesis is about peaceful nature tribes that came in contact with the kind of trade I mean: The trade of the expanding mediterranean tribes. So I mean a period after the mediterranean tribes invented agriculture and settled. Say, for example, the Germanic peaceful nature tribes, 2000BC-0BC.

@b_lumenkraft The currency will be whatever the expanding tribes use. First skins, clothes, ropes? I think initially is wasn't tokens or money because those Germanic tribes had no use for it at first. I don't know many details, but later on came tokens, money and the rest of my hypothesis.
Thank you all for engaging.

I'll read your link johnm33, thanks.
Earliest currency/coinage that I'm aware of were the copper sheets in the form of a bull hide used by Sumerian traders ~2250 BC Each sheet was apparently equal in value to a bull hide.
Much later the Hudson Bay Co. priced trade items in beaver pelts, although I don't believe that they invented a coinage with large flat tails. 8)
Terry

kassy

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #377 on: July 01, 2019, 03:12:28 PM »
Hypothesis:

These overlapping terms:
    Taking more than you need,
    Affluence,
    Wealth,
    Accumulation of objects,

all start with trade & markets.  These make it possible to have the concept of 'rich' and ownership. This leads to social stratification, leading to social hierarchy and inheritance. Here the concept of 'poor' is born. And winners & losers, profit, economic inequality.

Taking more than you need, Affluence and Wealth are all varieties of Accumulation of objects.

Today some hunter gatherers in Africa still shame the hunter who brings the big catch.
The important divide is a nomadic lifestyle vs a sedentary one. Accumulating stuff is less interesting if you have to carry it all (this is also why you play guitar and not piano by campfires).

The start of agriculture was the start of people settling in places and then Accumulation of objects became possible. Of course as soon as you have more then you need there will be trade and markets and specialization of labor.

 
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

nanning

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #378 on: July 01, 2019, 05:42:07 PM »
Great post kassy, thank you.
What do you think would be the effects of the expansion of those settlement cultures on the nomadic nature tribes of northern europe? How/when would their culture be changed to have rich people; status; social stratification through the trade, or other, contact?
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly"

kassy

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #379 on: July 02, 2019, 12:13:34 AM »
In the end the ´farmer peoples´ settled everywhere. You can still see this pattern playing out in some places. You settle and then worry about property rights while nomads don´t.

This is all before written history and nomadic tribes leave scant evidence so we will never know the details.

And it is slightly more complicated because the horse was the first way to project power. There was a book which made a connection between horse culture and the indo-european languages. There are many replacement events in the genetic history of europe. A lot more went on then market places but for the details read up on ancient archeology and population genetics.

Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

nanning

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #380 on: July 02, 2019, 05:29:03 AM »
Thanks again kassy. It is now clear to me that this (his)story is more complicated than I thought. Too bad we can't know the cultures of the old nomadic tribes.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly"

TerryM

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #381 on: July 02, 2019, 04:50:08 PM »
More recent examples might be found in North America where nomadic and agricultural tribes interacted with trading, property acquiring "civilized" Europeans.
"Guns, Germs and Steel" by Diamond provides an excellent introduction to the subject.
Terry

nanning

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #382 on: July 02, 2019, 06:08:24 PM »
Thanks Terry :)
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly"

sidd

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #383 on: July 05, 2019, 08:43:00 AM »
You can't make this up: Hampton billionaires against First Nation dispossessed over billboards

"outraged that the Shinnecock Nation has decided to erect two blazing 60-foot electronic billboards on their tiny patch of sovereign lands at the gateway to the Hamptons"

"advertising income from the billboards will generate income for the Nation that will help pay for health and dental clinics as well as a community daycare facility"

"rich Hamptons landowners are condemning the signs as an eyesore"

“The town is appalled by what is going on. I mean we are outraged”

"... 62,000-square foot home owned by junk bond king Ira Rennert. David Koch of Koch Industries lives along Southampton’s Meadow Lane, dubbed Billionaire Lane by Forbes. "

"700 Shinnecock tribal members residing on an 800-acre reservation in the Hamptons live below the federal poverty level ... "

https://truthout.org/articles/wealthy-hampton-homeowners-are-trying-to-suppress-tribal-sovereignty/

"Indeed I tremble for my country when reflect that God is just: that his justice cannot sleep for ever"
-- Jefferson

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sidd

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #384 on: July 06, 2019, 05:28:57 AM »
France and the Gilet Jaunes: blindness of the elites

A sympathetic review of the work of Edouard Loius in the point magazine by Stetler.

“I think we’ve all been rediscovering some fundamental values: we want to be able to eat well, to house ourselves, to work decently. We want to make politics about concrete things.”

"Our prudishness towards these needs has long fascinated and enraged Édouard Louis. In 2013, he was a young transplant from working-class Picardy studying among the philosopher-kings of Paris’s ultra-elite École Normale Supérieure."

“For a long time, I thought that politics was the word for a scourge. A scourge that came down upon the poor, on the little people like we said in my family, generation after generation…”

"I did not speak the same language as my classmates with whom I “debated,” who for the large part were children of the bourgeoisie ... I saw too well to what point what they were saying were merely words without any connection to lived experience, because this was in all actuality the case for them ... I saw only too clearly to what point the bourgeoisie sucked the life out of politics ... "

"one must really never have known misery to be able to think that a bit of graffiti on a historical monument is worse than the inability to afford healthcare, to pay for housing, to feed oneself or one’s family."

"The French elite’s long attempt to roll back the French welfare state and weaken labor laws in pursuit of higher profit margins is spelling hardship and misery for swaths of the population. The entanglement of abstractions that they hide behind to wage an economic civil war has ushered in a crisis in public morality—we’re losing contact with the vital reality of politics. Reversing the erosion of democratic life, Louis urges, requires an emancipatory, radical moral politics."

"this book of a man whose life has been stolen from his own hands."

"He writes of his father as a potentially free-spirited, hopeful and decent man that he never knew, cut down by the destruction and violence of working-class life."

" “The history of your body stands as an accusation against political history,” Louis writes in the text’s concluding chapter, where he lists and denounces the political figures and policies responsible for participating in the decimation of his father’s health. In 2006, Jacques Chirac’s government removed a series of medications from the list of government subsidies: “because you’d had to spend your days lying flat since your accident, and because you had bad nutrition, digestive problems were a constant for you. Buying medicine to relieve them became more and more difficult. Jacques Chirac and Xavier Bertrand destroyed your intestines.” "

“If you didn’t take the jobs they offered—or rather, forced on you—you would lose your right to welfare. … Nicolas Sarkozy and Martin Hirsch were breaking your back.”

"the French elite has committed a moral crime, and it’s time they be punished."

"Guilluy’s telling of the irremediable rupture between peripheral and elite France, which has now become a ready narrative relayed by media and politicians alike. The peripheral France thesis, and the rapaciousness with which it has been recycled ad nauseum in the press, has the advantage of reducing the popular rejection of the elite to a tale of solely cultural resentment. Macron’s government has eagerly exploited this opening, delivering mea culpas to a damaged French national identity and the supposedly conservative nature of the masses. "

". The failure of us moderns to make strong moral claims, to declare some activities and comportments fundamentally good and others fundamentally evil, is the mental makeup that leads directly to Emmanuel Macron. Our modern malaise is that we live under the “realm of lesser evil,” unwilling to assert a positive conception of the good life as we hide behind a meek tolerance that empties public life of a necessary moral content."

 “a social movement is precisely the moment when the possibility that those who are suffering might no longer say: ‘I’m suffering because of immigration and because of my neighbor who relies on welfare,’ but rather ‘I’m suffering because of those who govern. I’m suffering because of the weight of the system, because of Emmanuel Macron and Edouard Philippe.’ Social movements are moments to subvert language, a moment where our old languages can finally give way. This is what’s happening today.”

"If we look at politics as the government of some living people by other living people, as well as the existence of individuals within communities not of their choosing, then politics is what separates some populations, whose lives are supported, nurtured, protected, from other populations, who are exposed to death, to persecution, to murder."

"We need to re-appropriate the language of moral condemnation from its abuse in the hands of a sham populism. Common decency can be reduced to a caricature of old-fashioned, pre-1960s morality—and rammed down people’s throats until they ignore all the real evil-doers in this world. It can also be built from the ground up, out of the concrete needs and lived experiences of actual people in 2019. Louis’s faith in this common decency is a welcome sign."

Read the whole thing:

https://thepointmag.com/2019/criticism/the-good-populist-edouard-louis

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sidd

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #385 on: July 06, 2019, 05:40:22 AM »
Zucman et al. on inequality:

"The key difference between Europe and many other parts of the world (including Russia and
the United States) is that wealth inequality is significantly lower in Europe today than it was
a century ago. While wealth inequality appears to have returned to its level of a century ago
in both the United States and Russia, European countries have a more developed patrimonial
middle class which did not exist on the eve of World War 1. The high share of wealth owned by
the middle-class is largely the product of a number of policies adopted in the post-World War
II decades, including nationalizations, rent control, and tax policies which led to a historical
compression of wealth inequality during the mixed-economy regime of the 1950s, 1960s and
1970s."

"At the global level, wealth is highly concentrated: the top 10% owns more than 70% of
the total wealth in China, Europe, and the United States combined; the bottom 50% owns less
than 2%; and the middle 40% (which could be described as the global wealth middle-class) owns
less than 30%. Wealth concentration would probably be even higher if Latin America, Africa,
and the rest of Asia were included in the analysis, as most people in these regions would be in the
poorer parts of the distribution. Wealth is substantially more concentrated than income. This
result comes from both tails of the distribution. In most countries the share of wealth owned by
the bottom 50% is close to 0% (while the share of income earned by the bottom 50% is usually
around 15%–25%). That is, on aggregate, total assets for the bottom 50% are typically about
as large as total debts. At the top end by contrast, the wealthiest individuals own fortunes that
are very large compared to average wealth (within country, the average wealth of the top 0.1%
is typically 100 to 200 times larger than average wealth in the entire population today)."

"Zucman (2013, 2014) estimates that 8% of the world’s household financial
wealth—the equivalent of 10% of world GDP—is held offshore, or $5.6 trillion on the eve of the
world financial crisis in 2007. A similar estimate is obtained by Pellegrini et al. (2016). This
order of magnitude is at the low-end of the scale of available estimates. The OECD calculates
that households owned a total of $5 to $7 trillion offshore in 2007 (Owens, 2007); based on
interviews with wealth managers, the Boston Consulting Group (2008) finds $7.3 trillion that
same year; Cap Gemini and Merrill Lynch (2002) have a $8.5 trillion estimate for 2002; Palan,
Murphy, and Chavagneux (2010) write that “the global rich held in 2007 approximately $12
trillion of their wealth in tax havens;” and Henry (2012) finds $21 to $32 trillion as of 2010. One
limitation of Zucman’s (2013) methodology is that it only captures financial wealth, disregarding
valuables, works of art, real estate, and other non-financial assets, which may explain part of
the gap with other studies."

https://gabriel-zucman.eu/files/AJZ2017.pdf

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oren

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #386 on: July 07, 2019, 02:29:34 PM »
 
In the end the ´farmer peoples´ settled everywhere. You can still see this pattern playing out in some places. You settle and then worry about property rights while nomads don´t.

This is all before written history and nomadic tribes leave scant evidence so we will never know the details.

And it is slightly more complicated because the horse was the first way to project power. There was a book which made a connection between horse culture and the indo-european languages. There are many replacement events in the genetic history of europe. A lot more went on then market places but for the details read up on ancient archeology and population genetics.
I think the book you mention may be "The Horse, The Wheel, and Language", which I've read recently.  One of the things that surprised me was that economic equality actually proliferated among the herders, as it is far easier to accumulate a herd than profit from your own agriculture. Especially as the lucky herder will grow bigger while the unlucky herder will lose his animals to sickness and other calamities.

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #387 on: July 07, 2019, 05:45:00 PM »
Yes that is the one.

The herders still move all the time so that limits stuff they want to gather. And giving away a small part of a big herd to a fellow herder in need is also insurance for when the luck turns.



 
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #388 on: July 22, 2019, 11:32:57 PM »
Death by inequality:  Hall at buzzfeed on death sentences at 26

"he was no longer eligible for coverage under his parents’ health insurance ... found himself needing medication to live that he could not afford."

"these young adults are rationing, stockpiling, and turning to the black market for the medication they need to stay alive "

"Smith died of DKA in 2017, one month after turning 26 and being kicked off his mother’s insurance. He couldn’t afford insulin and had been rationing what little he had left."

"Marotta still regularly rations insulin. She regularly buys only one of the two types she needs, because she can’t afford the copays "

" ... rationing is literally just because I don’t have the $20 to pick it up today,"

" ... need to pay for multiple expensive supplies to help control their disease. Patients who can’t afford them cut corners by not regularly testing their blood sugar levels, relying instead on their body’s response to determine how much insulin they need. They also reuse one-time-use medical supplies, such as lancets that prick fingers to test blood sugar and needles to inject insulin, despite the risk of infection."

"a used needle that bent and broke off inside his body "

“Obviously it sucks”

https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/ellievhall/turning-26-type-1-diabetes

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TerryM

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #389 on: July 23, 2019, 02:26:17 AM »
The most infuriating thing about the above may be that insulin's discoverers gave insulin to the world for the payment of $1.00 each.
Terry

blumenkraft

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #390 on: July 28, 2019, 07:56:03 PM »
Debunk: The Neoliberal Education Myth

“You are not entitled to your opinion. You are entitled to your informed opinion. No one is entitled to be ignorant.”

SteveMDFP

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Re: Economic Inequality
« Reply #391 on: August 04, 2019, 02:08:58 AM »

Interesting short video about extreme wealth:

How to Spend a Fortune