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ArcticMelt2

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #100 on: June 28, 2019, 09:14:26 AM »
Data on the number of eruptions since 1982.

https://geysertimes.org/geyser.php?id=steamboat

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #101 on: June 28, 2019, 12:22:05 PM »
Wait, what?

What's the context of this ArcticMelt? Do we know why this happens?

bluice

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #102 on: June 28, 2019, 12:45:37 PM »
Is that data really correct?

AFAIK Etna erupts at least once every year, Stromboli every 20 minutes...
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b_lumenkraft

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #103 on: June 28, 2019, 12:50:16 PM »
This data is for only one geyser called Steamboat. I too thought it's globally at first.

I have no idea if it's unusual for a geyser to become more active all of a sudden. I expect it to be a common thing, or am i wrong?

crandles

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #104 on: June 28, 2019, 01:01:12 PM »
ArcticMelt2 data on last page shows there was another spike 1963-1965 with 26 29 and 22, so it doesn't seem uncommon for this geyser. (with gaps between spikes at 18 & 36 years)

be cause

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #105 on: June 28, 2019, 01:36:25 PM »
maybe all the rain has primed the pump ? b.c.
2007 + 5 = 2012 + 4 = 2016 + 3 = 2019 ...

interstitial

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #106 on: June 28, 2019, 02:02:25 PM »
If a tree falls in the forest and no one is there to.....
If a geyser spouts in the wild and no one is there to see it.......
I thought there was some mention of it being somewhat remote and not all of the eruptions would have been noticed/recorded? I guess not I didn't see any mention.

bluice

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #107 on: June 28, 2019, 02:18:25 PM »
This data is for only one geyser called Steamboat. I too thought it's globally at first.

I have no idea if it's unusual for a geyser to become more active all of a sudden. I expect it to be a common thing, or am i wrong?
No you are spot on right with that. Geysers come and go and can sometimes get dormant or active for no specific reason. You throw a rock in one and it can change its behaviour for good.

I cannot comprehend why that graph was posted here.
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ArcticMelt2

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #108 on: June 28, 2019, 04:44:31 PM »
This data is for only one geyser called Steamboat. I too thought it's globally at first.

I have no idea if it's unusual for a geyser to become more active all of a sudden. I expect it to be a common thing, or am i wrong?
No you are spot on right with that. Geysers come and go and can sometimes get dormant or active for no specific reason. You throw a rock in one and it can change its behaviour for good.

I cannot comprehend why that graph was posted here.

Because it is a very important geyser. The largest geyser in the supervolcano zone with past catastrophic eruptions. Therefore, his study is extremely important.

ArcticMelt2

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #109 on: June 28, 2019, 04:46:00 PM »
Wait, what?

What's the context of this ArcticMelt? Do we know why this happens?

This may indicate an approach to the awakening of a supervolcano, which will produce catastrophic CO2 emissions (degassing the mantle and turning into Venus).

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #110 on: June 28, 2019, 07:36:10 PM »
What you write now, AM, is in contrast to what you quoted the USGS as saying:
Quote
But don't worry. Increased activity at a single geyser doesn't indicate any new threat from the Yellowstone caldera — the "supervolcano" hiding under the park — according to USGS.

"Geysers are supposed to erupt, and most are erratic, like Steamboat," the agency wrote.
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magnamentis

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #111 on: June 29, 2019, 12:14:54 AM »
Wait, what?

What's the context of this ArcticMelt? Do we know why this happens?

This may indicate an approach to the awakening of a supervolcano, which will produce catastrophic CO2 emissions (degassing the mantle and turning into Venus).

an eruption of that supervolcano will first of all cause the sunlight to be blocked for a long long time and cause kind of a winter analog to a nuclear winter if the term is know to you. i assume there is a correct term used by meteorologists as well as volcanologists but i don't know that term. i'm sure someone knows and helps me out here

however the erruption of a supervolcano will cool the planet significantly du lack of insolation and not heat the planet due to CO2.

examples exist in abundance that are quite well documented.

happens/happened BTW on smaller scales quite frequently, i.e. krakatoa, pinatubo etc.

ArcticMelt2

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #112 on: June 29, 2019, 06:44:55 AM »
an eruption of that supervolcano will first of all cause the sunlight to be blocked for a long long time and cause kind of a winter analog to a nuclear winter if the term is know to you. i assume there is a correct term used by meteorologists as well as volcanologists but i don't know that term. i'm sure someone knows and helps me out here

however the erruption of a supervolcano will cool the planet significantly du lack of insolation and not heat the planet due to CO2.

examples exist in abundance that are quite well documented.

happens/happened BTW on smaller scales quite frequently, i.e. krakatoa, pinatubo etc.

A volcanic winter will last very short - in the case of a couple of years. After that, temperatures will rise at a tremendous rate to enormous quantities.

We do not have documented examples of supervolcano eruptions. Therefore, we do not know how much the concentration of greenhouse gases will increase after the eruption of supervolcano.

sidd

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #113 on: June 29, 2019, 07:44:48 AM »
Re: "documented examples of supervolcano eruptions"

It is documented in the geology. For example,

http://all-geo.org/highlyallochthonous/2010/08/yellowstone-where-did-all-the-ash-go/

It would be quite naive to imagine that an yellowstone eruption that put a meter of ash in iowa would only have effect for a couple of years ...

There are many papers bout this. That said, i do not think that yellowstone will blow soon because of a fumarole going off unexpectedly. USGS has good monitoring, we would get a decade or so of warning.

Not that the results would be pleasant, regardless of warning.

sidd
 

ArcticMelt2

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #114 on: June 29, 2019, 07:54:05 AM »
Re: "documented examples of supervolcano eruptions"

It is documented in the geology. For example,

http://all-geo.org/highlyallochthonous/2010/08/yellowstone-where-did-all-the-ash-go/

These eruptions were at least 2 million years old, and the oldest ice cores are limited to a million years. Measuring greenhouse gas concentrations through marine precipitation is very inaccurate. In this regard, we have no data on how much greenhouse gases supervolcanoes emit.

ArcticMelt2

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #115 on: June 29, 2019, 08:09:50 AM »
In general, volcanoes even in a quiet state emit significant amounts of greenhouse gases:

https://skepticalscience.com/graphics.php?g=275



In this regard, the emission from supervolcano may well exceed all emissions from human civilization.

Interestingly, the last time Yellowstone erupted 600 thousand years ago. How much did he emit CO2 at the same time according to ice cores?

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #116 on: June 29, 2019, 08:26:30 AM »
Re: These eruptions were at least 2 million years old

If one had bothered to read the reference, it is to an eruption 600 (actually 640) Kyr ago. But it is clearly too difficult to actually read these boring things.

As for greenhouse gas emission one could look at EPICA ice core. But i am not aware of any discovery of Yellowstone signature there. I welcome correction.

A revised EPICA is at

https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/2014GL061957

open access.

There might be a blip at 640 Kyr. But i have not yet seen any connection to Yellowstone. I attach fig 2.

sidd
« Last Edit: June 29, 2019, 09:28:19 AM by sidd »

ArcticMelt2

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #117 on: June 29, 2019, 09:05:40 AM »
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vsc/file_mngr/file-154/Gerlach-2011-EOS_AGU.pdf

Quote
Supereruptions are extremely rare, with recurrence intervals of 100,000–200,000 years; none have occurred historically, the most recent examples being Indonesia’s Toba volcano, which erupted 74,000 years ago, and the United States’ Yellowstone caldera, which erupted 2 million years ago. Interestingly, these calculations strongly suggest that present-day annual anthropogenic CO2 emissions may exceed the CO2 output of one or more supereruptions every year.

Another thing is if the melting of glaciers destabilizes tectonic plates, and every year we will have a supereruptions.

sidd

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #118 on: June 29, 2019, 09:16:39 AM »
Re: every year we will have a supereruptions.

Wait, what ?  This is apocalypse prediction at it's finest. Every year ? How many supervolcanoes do you think exist on earth ? And how often are you suggesting they go off ?

I look forward to reading your papers in the geology journals.

sidd

ArcticMelt2

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #119 on: June 29, 2019, 09:28:44 AM »
Re: every year we will have a supereruptions.

Wait, what ?  This is apocalypse prediction at it's finest. Every year ? How many supervolcanoes do you think exist on earth ? And how often are you suggesting they go off ?

I look forward to reading your papers in the geology journals.

sidd

I understand your skepticism. But after all, people now emit carbon dioxide 100 times faster than the ocean for 10 thousand years:



We are changing the climate system of the planet faster than at any other time. In this regard, the glaciers collapse faster than in any other period of the geological history of the Earth. This is likely to cause destabilization of tectonic plates and frequent eruptions of supervolcanoes.

sidd

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #120 on: June 29, 2019, 10:19:23 AM »
Re: the glaciers collapse faster than in any other period of the geological history of the Earth

The geological history of earth is quite long, so a citation might be nice.

We dont really have that much ice right now. We have had snowball earth before, but there is little data on deglaciation after.

But more recently we have had the last deglaciation and the Eemian and Wisconsinian.  We have had a meter every twenty year for five hundred years of SLR from ice melt  in last deglaciation, look at MWP1A. We see no evidence of supervolcanoes popping every year then.

So colour me unconvinced.

sidd


oren

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #121 on: June 29, 2019, 12:18:52 PM »
AM2, you've gone from science to complete fantasy.

Archimid

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #122 on: June 29, 2019, 12:48:11 PM »
It seems terribly obvious to me that global warming, glacial melting and changes in the hydrologic cycles will increase volcanic activity. It hasn't shown up in the data because the warming and melting is barely beginning. The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence in this case.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

ArcticMelt2

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #123 on: June 29, 2019, 01:16:33 PM »
No fiction, only science.

Quote
Journal of Earth Science and Engineering 4 (2013) 1-53
Anthropogenic Earth-Change: We are on a Slippery Slope, Breaking New Ground and It’s Our Fault—A Multi-Disciplinary Review and New Unified Earth-System Hypothesis
C. Allen

Received: January 01, 2014 / Accepted: January 12, 2014 / Published: January 25, 2014

Abstract: Human activity could be changing the Earth’s foundations themselves, as we affect multiple systems interacting in feedback mechanisms changing the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, biosphere, and even the lithosphere (solid surface) and asthenosphere (deformable semi-molten rock layer beneath). Anthropogenic movement of ice, water and sediment alters viscosity and movement of the asthenosphere; this induces earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanism and rifting, and may induce plate-tectonic-change. These processes may account for the timing of unexplained contemporary Icelandic, New Zealand, Chilean, Japanese and Indonesian seismicity, volcanism and magma movement. Climate-change and sea-level rise are creating: slip-planes from differential water pore-pressures and/or weakening of previous fault-planes; sediment-change and altered hydrology and reservoir-mass, inducing isostasy and further change in pore-pressure. Loss of plant biomass and diversity alter hydrology, precipitation and transpiration, causing isostasy and further sediment- and climate-change. Increased ocean-mass, temperatures and acidity, reduced oceanic oxygenation, and increased transport of (organic) sediments elevate the production and destabilisation of gas-hydrates, causing slumps and tsunamis. Isostasy and altered viscosity of the asthenosphere increase seismicity, slope and faulting, which are the prime triggers for slumping and tsunamis.
Altered asthenosphere flows hasten subduction and rifting landward of subduction, enhancing volcanism. All of these processes predominantly coincide, temporally and spatially, in the coasts and continental margins, and the Pacific ring-of-fire, although response times and extents may vary from immediate to multi-millennial scales and from negligible to catastrophic. Contemporary Icelandic seismic and volcanic activity is explained by depleted magma reserves on the north-western side of the mid-ocean ridge as asthenosphere moves from the constructive boundary under deglaciating and rising Greenland.

Key words: Anthropogenic climate-change, volcanism, tectonism, vegetation-change, sedimentation, isostasy.

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #124 on: June 29, 2019, 03:20:30 PM »
I think this quote means that people emit each year more CO2 than what a supereruption does (and super eruptions don't occur every year - they occur about once every 100,000 years).

https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vsc/file_mngr/file-154/Gerlach-2011-EOS_AGU.pdf

Quote
Supereruptions are extremely rare, with recurrence intervals of 100,000–200,000 years; none have occurred historically, the most recent examples being Indonesia’s Toba volcano, which erupted 74,000 years ago, and the United States’ Yellowstone caldera, which erupted 2 million years ago. Interestingly, these calculations strongly suggest that present-day annual anthropogenic CO2 emissions may exceed the CO2 output of one or more supereruptions every year.

Another thing is if the melting of glaciers destabilizes tectonic plates, and every year we will have a supereruptions.
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magnamentis

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #125 on: June 29, 2019, 06:41:56 PM »
an eruption of that supervolcano will first of all cause the sunlight to be blocked for a long long time and cause kind of a winter analog to a nuclear winter if the term is know to you. i assume there is a correct term used by meteorologists as well as volcanologists but i don't know that term. i'm sure someone knows and helps me out here

however the erruption of a supervolcano will cool the planet significantly du lack of insolation and not heat the planet due to CO2.

examples exist in abundance that are quite well documented.

happens/happened BTW on smaller scales quite frequently, i.e. krakatoa, pinatubo etc.

A volcanic winter will last very short - in the case of a couple of years. After that, temperatures will rise at a tremendous rate to enormous quantities.

We do not have documented examples of supervolcano eruptions. Therefore, we do not know how much the concentration of greenhouse gases will increase after the eruption of supervolcano.

a) thanks for the term "volcanic winter" every day one can learn is a good day ;)

b) a few years is true but if that's "very short" is probably prone to the relation and opinions

c) warming after that depending on current state and conditions can be but does not have to.

after all we had trigger events in the past and once the earth became a white snowball and albedo shrinks to an extremely low level the system can switch it's state, we don't know that for sure.

last but not least, as mentioned above, with your second post i'm fine despite the uncertainty(ies) i mentioned. in your first post you forgot to mention the few years in between, hence we're
fine now, at least i am and hope you're fine too ;)
« Last Edit: June 29, 2019, 08:05:39 PM by magnamentis »

kassy

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #126 on: June 29, 2019, 07:11:00 PM »
All that Yellowstone stuff is local. Earthquake swarms come and go, geysers do stuff. Catastrophists love it and i like the BBC fake doc movie especially the ash fall joke.

Maybe we modify plate tectonics in the long run but all the effects are slow because these are geologic processes.

Show me a credible example of an immediate response time for a geologic process and i might be impressed or amazed.

 
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magnamentis

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #127 on: June 29, 2019, 08:09:30 PM »
All that Yellowstone stuff is local. Earthquake swarms come and go, geysers do stuff. Catastrophists love it and i like the BBC fake doc movie especially the ash fall joke.

Maybe we modify plate tectonics in the long run but all the effects are slow because these are geologic processes.

Show me a credible example of an immediate response time for a geologic process and i might be impressed or amazed.

sorry but then you should first read what a superplume is and that's a global event for sure.

after you follow the discussion here you should have been warned that there is more to it than just a few geysers. it's called a superplume or supervolcano. it erupted in the past around 600'000'000 years in between eruptions and is now overdue.

that's not fun, it's worse than the asteroid that extinct the dinosaurs, way worse but what do i write here, google is your friend.

BTW interesting how many deniers are in this forum, even though they don't deny global worming, many here deny many other things that should be as common knowledge as the global warming and it's reasons and developments.

kassy

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #128 on: June 29, 2019, 08:42:19 PM »
I was a mod an a global events forum for ages. It was a US based forum and one of the recurrent themes was stuff happening in Yellowstone. The ground goes up, the ground goes down, some quake swarms a bad tempered geyser. They do some stuff but it does not mean much on a large scale.

Yes seismically active regions will have some seismic activity not related to superplumes doing anything. The ground there must be weaker because of the history but that does not mean that the superplume returns any time soon.

And the claim related to global warming is meh (as is the local bolding procedure).
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #129 on: June 29, 2019, 09:28:52 PM »
Quote
[Yellowstone supervolcano eruption] is now overdue.
From the USGS:
Quote
in the past 2.1 million years with a recurrence interval of about 600,000 to 800,000 years.
...
scientists have identified at least 27 different rhyolite lava flows that erupted after the most recent caldera eruptions, about 640,000 years ago, from vents inside the caldera. The most recent was about 70,000 years ago. Many of these eruptions were separated in time by several tens of thousands of years. Because the evidence of earlier eruptions may have been either buried or destroyed, we do not really know how often the volcano has actually erupted.
So if there is a honest-to-god eruption during our life time, it will likely be a little one, not 'the big one'.

More from the USGS:
Quote
probably 15 to 20 caldera-forming eruptions have occurred along the hotspot as it left a trail from western Idaho to Yellowstone within the past 16.5 million years.
So 16.5 million years divided by 20 gives an average of one significant set of events per 825,000 years.  (If you prefer to believe only 15 significant set of events, that's one per 1,100,000 years.)
"Overdue" is a book from a library with a stamp that declares when the book was due.  For most other things, it's just statistics.  Don't forget the 3rd joke here.

For an example on geological 'timeliness':
Quote
The world's most famous geyser, Old Faithful in Yellowstone, currently erupts around 20 times a day. These eruptions are predicted with a 90 percent confidence rate, within a 10 minute variation, based on the duration and height of the previous eruption.

Old Faithful was once called “Eternity’s Timepiece” because of the regularity of its eruptions. However, this geyser has never erupted at exact hourly intervals as many believe. People also speak of the average time between eruptions. This is misleading. The mathematical average between eruptions of Old Faithful is currently 74 minutes, but it doesn’t like to act average! Intervals can range from 60-110 minutes.
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sidd

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #130 on: June 29, 2019, 10:32:07 PM »
The obvious problem is that there were zero supervolcanoes going off during MWP1A, where ice melt was huge. Note the term supervolcanes. There are very few of these. By contrast there are many regular volcanoes and they go off all the time.

Until a theory that predicts supervolcano eruptions during rapid deglaciation can explain why MWP1A had none i will not take it seriously. Or for that matter, why no supervolcanoes during the final stage of Eemian, 120Kyr ago ?

As regards the paper by Allen, it is comically bad. He fits exponential trends to data that barely show a linear trend to start with. As might be expected the confidence measures are horribly low. So it is no surprise that we see that it has garnered exactly zero citations.

Here is a much better paper on ice melt and icequakes by Roosli et al., doi: 10.3189/2014JoG13J210 and open access. Needless to say, no supervolcanoes predicted.

sidd

kassy

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #131 on: June 29, 2019, 10:51:01 PM »
Which is logical since they are special local occasions and what sets them apart is interesting but it is not related to global warming.
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sidd

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #132 on: June 29, 2019, 11:48:19 PM »
Re:  they are special local occasions

If this in reply to my post, MWP1A and Eemian were most definitely global.

sidd

magnamentis

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #133 on: June 30, 2019, 03:10:32 AM »
incredibe how people can discuss and tear apart simple facts and do a lot of blabla around it.

a superplume is not a common volcano and the impact is not local but global, proven and common knowledge.

further this is the volcano thread and what i say refers to superplumes/supervolcanoes like there has been one in sibiria long ago and there is one in the U.S. of A. that is under the yellowstone national park. i did not say there is a relation to global warming but once such a supervolcanoe explodes global warming will be halted due to volcanic winter and how long that can last and what will be the exact feedback depends on how much of the planet will freeze white under the cloud and dust cover.

further there are certain patterns and regularities for them to go off, it's not all and only statistics. the heartbeat of most of those supervolcanoes are well analyzed and clearly and thoroughly documented (scientifically of course) and yellowstone for one is overdue based on documented past breakouts.

either way i'm out of here, just wanted to provide something to consider but won't take further part in fruitless discussions as long as some participants don't even verify or falsify a statement but continue to stick stubbornly to wrong assumptions.

Rod

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #134 on: June 30, 2019, 03:43:10 AM »

either way i'm out of here, just wanted to provide something to consider but won't take further part in fruitless discussions as long as some participants don't even verify or falsify a statement but continue to stick stubbornly to wrong assumptions.

I think you misinterpreted the comments mag.  This is a very important and not well studied subject.  Different people have different opinions, but they are all just opinions. 

Please keep contributing.  I like your common sense approach.  I also respect what others have to say based upon what they have learned. 

It is never good for the conversation when someone says F**k this I’m out.  Keep posting.  We all went to hear what you have to say.   

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #135 on: June 30, 2019, 04:55:41 AM »
...
yellowstone for one is overdue based on documented past breakouts.
...
No it is not, even if you say it is!  Read what the USGS says - they are the scientists most in the know.  I gave the link to the USGS publication I quoted in that post. 

Alas, Magnamentis, when you write babble, it detracts from your posts where you do demonstrate authority.
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kassy

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #136 on: June 30, 2019, 06:31:16 PM »
a superplume is not a common volcano and the impact is not local but global

That is not the point, the point is that they are not triggered by anything we do as claimed by AM2. They run on their on geologic timescales. They are point sources and not very frequent in time. They have some effect when they happen and then that fade.

That is why they don´t show up in the historical record like sidd states. I should have typed supervolcanoes instead of they in my comment.



Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

ArcticMelt2

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #137 on: June 30, 2019, 07:37:03 PM »
Re:  they are special local occasions

If this in reply to my post, MWP1A and Eemian were most definitely global.

sidd

You again do not take into account the speed of modern climate change.
Now the concentration of greenhouse gases is growing 100 times faster than during natural glacial cycles.
During the glacial cycles, the ocean rise rate did not exceed 1 cm per year. In the current warming, this rate will be 100 times greater - up to a meter per year.

You can imagine how the load on tectonic plates will increase at such a rate of climate change.

sidd

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #138 on: June 30, 2019, 10:42:00 PM »
Re: During the glacial cycles, the ocean rise rate did not exceed 1 cm per year.

During MWP1A, SLR was 5 cm/yr. This went on for 500yr. Even Hansen does not project 1m/yr.

So, I should believe projections of 1m/yr because ...?

sidd
« Last Edit: June 30, 2019, 10:49:16 PM by sidd »

ArcticMelt2

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #139 on: June 30, 2019, 11:11:14 PM »
So, I should believe projections of 1m/yr because ...?

Because the only thing from which we can definitely know is the average rate of change in the concentration of greenhouse gases in past glacial periods and in our time.

Everything else is very vague (especially the size of climate sensitivity and feedback).

In this regard, I have little doubt in the estimates that the current ice sheets collapse in 100-200 years.

Most likely, scientists calling conservative estimates of ocean level growth of one cm per year simply do not want to sow panic.

sidd

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #140 on: July 01, 2019, 06:12:19 AM »
It is quite simple to calculate what it takes to produce SLR of 1m/yr. Bear in mind that this would entirely deglaciate GIS in 6 yr, WAIS in four and all of AIS in under a century.

I) Begin with the radiative imbalance of the order of 1watt/m^2 or about 1e22 J.yr
If all that went into ice melt (far from it in real life) that would be about 6 cm/yr or about the same as MWP1A
So to get 1myr you would need
a) radiative imbalance of 16 watt/m^2 or around 1e23 J/yr
b) all of it going into ice melt

II)  other source of heat of that magnitude in the system is the ocean. So if you can get aroung 1e23 J/yr outta the ocean and put it in the ice sheet you might manage. Sy by boiling the ocean and putting hot water deluge as rain on the ice sheets

III) or you could alternatively create a supervolcano under one of the icesheets, or something like the Siberian or Deccan traps under them

Color me entirely unconvinced. "Everything else is very vague" might be true if you dont know any physics. Or havent read any of the literature.

And if you will not do arithmetic, you are doomed to talk nonsense. What do they teach in schools nowadays ? Clearly not nearly enuf.

sidd

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #141 on: July 03, 2019, 09:28:34 PM »
Stromboli volcano just erupted
(via Reddit)


Rod

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #142 on: July 05, 2019, 01:21:24 AM »
Worldview image of the volcano Raikoke spewing ash into the Pacific.

The volcano's first eruption since 1924.

Looks like it will have an impact on the Arctic.


bbr2314

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #143 on: July 05, 2019, 01:36:09 AM »
I saw an alarmist story on an asteroid in the Express and looked up this year's possible problems.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006_QV89

The above is actually a very high number, with European scientists estimating a 1 in 7300 chance of impact (1 in 9100 other estimate).

I couldn't find an asteroid thread so I figured this was probably the next best fit. An exceedingly unlikely event, but we will apparently have a better idea of trajectory by the end of this month, so something to keep an eye on. The body is only 100 feet wide but that would still make quite a bang if it did end up impacting. 

oren

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #144 on: July 05, 2019, 09:24:06 AM »
I think this would fit better under the Astronomical News thread, at least until impact...

kassy

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #145 on: July 05, 2019, 03:39:29 PM »
I agree and i would like to add that after impact it would still in no way qualify as a volcano.  ;)
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

bbr2314

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #146 on: July 05, 2019, 03:42:25 PM »
I agree and i would like to add that after impact it would still in no way qualify as a volcano.  ;)
I didn't know there was an astronomical thread! In any case it is barely worth discussing just an interesting 1/8000ish chance of something benignly terrible.

Tor Bejnar

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #147 on: July 05, 2019, 06:06:53 PM »
Arctic ice is healthy for children and other living things.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #148 on: August 24, 2019, 01:55:48 AM »
For years, scientists have tried to pinpoint which volcano caused a spell of global cooling in the 6th century A.D. They've finally found the culprit.

Colossal volcano behind 'mystery' global cooling finally found
The eruption devastated local Maya settlements and caused crop failures around the world.
Quote
The ices of Greenland and Antarctica bear the fingerprints of a monster: a gigantic volcanic eruption in 539 or 540 A.D. that killed tens of thousands and helped trigger one of the worst periods of global cooling in the last 2,000 years. Now, after years of searching, a team of scientists has finally tracked down the source of the eruption.

The team’s work, published in Quaternary Science Reviews, lays out new evidence that ties the natural disaster to Ilopango, a now-dormant volcano in El Salvador. Researchers estimate that in its sixth-century eruption, Ilopango expelled the equivalent of 10.5 cubic miles of dense rock, making it one of the biggest volcanic events on Earth in the last 7,000 years. The blast was more than a hundred times bigger than the 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption and several times larger than the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo. It dealt the local Maya settlements a blow that forever altered their trajectory.

“This is the largest eruption in Central America that human beings have ever witnessed,” says lead study author Robert Dull, a geologist at California Lutheran University. “The importance of the event is even greater, both how the Maya overcame it and how it impacted what happened next.”

The new work helps solve a longtime geologic mystery. Historical accounts that date to 536 describe a dark fog that dimmed the sun and ushered in a wave of crop deaths. Until recently, scholars were open to the idea that these clouds were the remains of an asteroid or comet. But modern data confirms that the event was volcanic—and that it was two volcanoes up to four years apart, not just one. ...
https://relay.nationalgeographic.com/proxy/distribution/public/amp/science/2019/08/colossal-volcano-behind-mystery-global-cooling-found
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

vox_mundi

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Re: Volcanoes
« Reply #149 on: August 25, 2019, 06:32:04 PM »
A Giant Pumice Raft Floating in the Pacific Could Help Heal Australia's Great Barrier Reef https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2019/08/25/asia/pumice-stone-underwater-volcano-great-barrier-reef-intl/index.html

A pumice "raft" the size of Manhattan is drifting towards Australia, bringing along with it new marine life that could help with the recovery of the Great Barrier Reef's corals, half of which have been killed in recent years as a result of climate change.

The massive floating sheet of volcanic rock was first spotted by sailors on August 9, days after an underwater volcano is believed to have erupted near the Pacific Island of Tonga, according to NASA Earth Observatory



Days later, Australian sailors heading towards Vanatu on the ROAM catamaran said they encountered volcanic rocks "made up of pumice stones from marble to basketball size such that water was not visible."

"It was quite eerie, actually," Larissa said. "The whole ocean was matte -- we couldn't see the water reflection of the moon."

"The rocks were kind of closing in around us, so we couldn't see our trail or our wake at all. We could just see the edge where it went back to regular water -- shiny water -- at night," Michael added, saying they could see the rock from every direction.

"It was a bit of a mystery, we didn't know how deep it was, if we were sailing over a volcano that was active at that moment. It looked almost like there was more coming up, bubbling up from underneath," said Larissa.

« Last Edit: August 25, 2019, 07:20:46 PM by vox_mundi »
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