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Rod

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #150 on: July 12, 2019, 05:09:18 PM »
Early arrival of spring disrupts the mutualism between plants and pollinators

Quote
Global warming has affected the phenology of diverse organisms, such as the timing of plant flowering and leafing, animal hibernation and migration. This is particularly so in cold ecosystems, increasing the risk of disturbing mutual relationships between living organisms. It could also affect the relationship between plants and insects that carry pollen, but few studies have been conducted and the subject remains largely unknown.

The researchers examined Corydailis ambigua growing in cold-temperature forests in Hokkaido in northern Japan, and bumblebees, which collect nectar from the flowers. Usually the bloom of the flowers and emergence of the bumblebees are in sync.

They monitored the plant and insect for 19 years in a natural forest of Hokkaido, recording the timing of snowmelt, flowering and emergence of bumblebees as well as the seed-set rate. In this way, they were able to observe how the snowmelt timing and ambient temperatures affect the local phenology.

Long-term monitoring revealed that snowmelt timing dictates when Corydailis ambigua flowers. The earlier the snowmelt, the earlier the flowering. The researchers also found that bumblebees, which hibernate underground during winter, become active when soil temperatures reach 6 C. When the snowmelt is early, flowering tends to occur before the bees emerge, creating a mismatch. The wider the mismatch, the lower the seed-set rate due to insufficient pollination.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-07/hu-eao071219.php


vox_mundi

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #151 on: July 12, 2019, 06:25:03 PM »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

petm

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #152 on: July 13, 2019, 12:47:12 AM »
Long-term monitoring revealed that snowmelt timing dictates when Corydailis ambigua flowers. The earlier the snowmelt, the earlier the flowering. The researchers also found that bumblebees, which hibernate underground during winter, become active when soil temperatures reach 6 C. When the snowmelt is early, flowering tends to occur before the bees emerge, creating a mismatch.

This requires evolution. Plants that flower later will become more likely to be pollinated, passing on the alleles causing earlier pollination. Bumblebees that become active earlier will gather more pollen, similarly resulting in selection.

At the current rates of environmental change, is there sufficient time (generations of these species) for evolution to save this and other systems? It's becoming increasingly unlikely.

This should be the top argument for action, regardless of arbitrary temperature thresholds. The more GWGs we pump into the atmosphere, the greater the chance of complete ecosystem collapse.

But frankly those in power don't give a s**t.

kassy

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #153 on: July 20, 2019, 10:47:41 AM »
Russia alarmed by large fall in bee populations

Large areas of central and southern Russia have seen a major decline in their bee populations in recent months.

The head of the Russian beekeepers' union, Arnold Butov, said 20 regions had reported mass bee deaths.

The affected regions include Bryansk and Kursk, south of Moscow, and Saratov and Ulyanovsk on the Volga River.

Mr Butov, quoted by Russian media, said the crisis might mean 20% less honey being harvested. Some officials blamed poorly regulated pesticide use.

Yulia Melano, at the rural inspection service Rosselkhoznadzor, complained that her agency had lost most of its powers to control pesticide use since 2011.

Russia produces about 100,000 tonnes of honey annually. Mr Butov said the union's members were collecting data on bee losses, so that by 1 August a detailed report could be submitted to the Russian government.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-49047402
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Pmt111500

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #154 on: July 20, 2019, 02:16:10 PM »
Russia alarmed by large fall in bee populations

Large areas of central and southern Russia have seen a major decline in their bee populations in recent months.

<Cliip>

Yulia Melano, at the rural inspection service Rosselkhoznadzor, complained that her agency had lost most of its powers to control pesticide use since 2011.
<Clip>
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-49047402

And an article from 2013 apparently claims otherwise
https://windowstorussia.com/russian-bees-save-world.html

It looks like this is not going to happen.
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Tor Bejnar

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #155 on: July 20, 2019, 06:02:45 PM »
From two recent posts:
Quote
[U.S.] States Get Approval to Use Bee-Killing Pesticide
https://www.rawstory.com/2019/07/usda-indefinitely-suspends-honey-bee-tracking-survey-as-states-get-approval-to-use-bee-killing-pesticide/
Quote
Large areas of central and southern Russia have seen a major decline in their bee populations in recent months.
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-49047402
Now, where did all those American bee-killing pesticides get sprayed???  :o
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nanning

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #156 on: July 20, 2019, 06:04:15 PM »
<clip>
It looks like this is not going to happen.
With "this" I assume you mean the 2013 article?
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Rod

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #157 on: July 29, 2019, 04:53:14 AM »
I live in the Midwest.  I specifically plant native wildflowers for the birds and insects. 

My anecdotal observations agree 100% with this article.  The monarch butterflies are nothing like they used to be.  Even my kids mentioned it the other day. 

I do have milkweed growing in my yard and a few monarchs, but it is nothing like it was even ten years ago.  Unfortunately, milkweed is a hard plant to cultivate and you can’t buy it at garden stores.  I dug up a few plants along the road about 15 years ago and planted them in my yard.  It is an annual so it spreads by seed and never pops up where you want it to.  Most people who want pretty manicured lawns and gardens will never propagate something like wild milkweed because it is really hard to control where it decides to sprout up each year. 

The herbicides around the farms have all but wiped it out in the wild.  After I read this article I drove around on gravel roads out in the country and could not find a single milkweed plant anywhere.   

It is sad what we are losing.  Monarchs are beautiful, but they are so specialized (between needing milkweed for larva and wintering in a small area in Mexico) that I am worried they are not going to be around much longer. 

Link to the full article:

https://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2019/07/22/Scientists-scramble-to-learn-why-monarch-butterflies-are-dying-so-quickly/6961563481223/

vox_mundi

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #158 on: August 01, 2019, 05:32:45 PM »
Continuing Slaughter: Mass Bee Deaths Sting Russian Beekeepers
https://phys.org/news/2019-08-mass-bee-deaths-russian-beekeepers.html



... Rubtsov, who keeps a large honeybee farm on the edge of a small village in the Tula region south of Moscow, is one of hundreds of beekeepers across Russia to report mass bee deaths that have robbed them of their livelihood.

Eighty-two bee colonies—almost the entire farm—have died since early July, and the survivors will unlikely make it through the winter, he said.

That is over three million dead bees and Rubtsov estimated his losses at 1.6 million rubles ($25,000).

All the bees in the vicinity have met the same fate.

People around Bobrovka are certain that the culprit is a local company growing rapeseed, a cash crop with yellow flowers used for cooking oil, cattle feed, and biofuel, that treated its fields with insecticides on July 4.

Viktor Morozov, another beekeeper who kept hives in a nearby forest, filmed empty pesticide containers lying on the ground alongside the rapeseed fields, but said the workers denied using a strong insecticide that contains fipronil.

A lab in Moscow eventually confirmed the presence on the rapeseed plants of fipronil, which is legal in Russia provided certain precautions are taken but banned in the EU.

... "Flowering rapeseed is a big attraction for the bees, so it was like an ambush," said Rubtsov.

Russia's agriculture watchdog confirmed the bee deaths were caused by uncontrolled use of insecticides and acknowledged that their use is not being monitored closely.

"The volumes of pesticides being used and their quality aren't checked by the government," spokeswoman Yulia Melano told Russian news agencies.

Not only is use of pesticides not monitored, she noted, but nobody coordinates between beekeepers and farmers about their use.


Studies have shown that the neurotoxin fipronil, along with so-called neonicotinoid substances used in other pesticides, can cause bee colonies to collapse and harm other insects such as butterflies, as well as worms and fish.

The EU banned the use of fipronil and most neonicotinoids on outdoor crops in 2017 and 2018, respectively.

Russians are bitter that Europe makes environmentally-friendly biodiesel from Russian rapeseed grown with pesticides that the EU has banned for use at home.

Quote
"... The pesticides banned in Europe have all been dumped here in Russia"

Rapeseed cultivation has doubled in Russia over the past decade with most of the processed oil exported abroad.[/b]

... Brandorf believes that following the loss of their hives many beekeepers will simply quit, as with no government support, the profession is becoming unprofitable.

"It's becoming easier to just close bee farms," she said.

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

nanning

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #159 on: August 02, 2019, 05:58:47 AM »
They're not insects but I put this best here I think.

I am worried about the spiders. It looks like a large loss of populations since a couple of years. You'd say with the loss of flying insects, one would expect a serious decline, but what I expect is adding to the pressure are predators that get creative in finding other foodsources. Predators such as birds and especially bats. Can someone confirm this? I haven't found articles on this in a quick search.

Personal emotional:
Please please come back, insects spiders fish birds mammals frogs! I miss you! Where has the living nature of my youth gone? And I'm only 53. I see some strange signs from trees as well. Aaargh.
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TerryM

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #160 on: August 02, 2019, 10:19:06 AM »
Good news for a change!


I saw 2 apparently healthy Monarch Butterflys today. The first I've seen in years.


Locally here in Southern Ontario there used to be millions of them every year. A decade ago a local conservation site counted 14 over a week long count & everyone assumed that this was the end of an era.


A relative in Indiana reports that she too has seen Monarchs this last week.


Is it too much to hope?
Terry

DrTskoul

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #161 on: August 02, 2019, 12:20:54 PM »
I am trying to save as much milkweed in my yard as I can for that reason...

be cause

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #162 on: August 02, 2019, 12:57:19 PM »
I'm having to control some weeds .. by scythe and hand .. yesterday I pulled a benweed/ragwort . The insects that followed it to my compost heap have persuaded me to leave the rest ; it was like a funeral procession .. b.c.
2007 + 5 = 2012 + 4 = 2016 + 3 = 2019 ...

DrTskoul

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #163 on: August 02, 2019, 01:02:31 PM »
I'm having to control some weeds .. by scythe and hand .. yesterday I pulled a benweed/ragwort . The insects that followed it to my compost heap have persuaded me to leave the rest ; it was like a funeral procession .. b.c.

Ragwort and mugwort are the worst. I do not like invasive weeds ..all work done by hand. No herbicides. I have a frog pond after all as a safe heaven for the local amphibian population. 

Gray-Wolf

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #164 on: August 02, 2019, 01:07:31 PM »
On a more positive note we , here in the UK, are in a bit of a 'Painted Lady' invasion!

Numbers were up in spring/early summer in the parts of Europe they come from so we are in a 'decadal' spike in numbers

My buddleia is earning its nickname this summer!!!
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nanning

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #165 on: August 02, 2019, 07:40:00 PM »
On a more positive note we , here in the UK, are in a bit of a 'Painted Lady' invasion!

Numbers were up in spring/early summer in the parts of Europe they come from so we are in a 'decadal' spike in numbers

My buddleia is earning its nickname this summer!!!
What a coincidence. This morning a painted lady (distelvlinder, Vanessa cardui) sat sometime on my windowsill and I have taken a nice photo.
This is in the North of the Netherlands.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly"

be cause

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #166 on: August 04, 2019, 06:22:18 PM »
while thinking about painted ladies yesterday one landed beside me .. 5 years since I last played host to a few . In 2009 I watched thousands arrive in NE Donegal from Scotland  .. on 31st May .. b.c.
2007 + 5 = 2012 + 4 = 2016 + 3 = 2019 ...

Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #167 on: August 13, 2019, 03:39:15 AM »
Bolsonaro approves 290 new pesticide products.
Also, 1,942 registered pesticides were quickly reevaluated, with the number considered extremely toxic dropped from 702 to just 43.
https://news.mongabay.com/2019/08/bolsonaro-administration-approves-290-new-pesticide-products-for-use/
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TerryM

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #168 on: August 13, 2019, 03:56:10 AM »
Strictly anecdotal, but two friends complained bitterly about the swarms of mosquitoes that ruined their summer vacation in Prince Edward Island.


Locally (So. Ontario) there's no change, but for an unusual number of "tent caterpillars" seen from the road.
Terry

nanning

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #169 on: August 13, 2019, 06:42:42 AM »
Interesting animals: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tent_caterpillar

In '94 I had a nice drive with a friend in his jagV12convertible  :-X over the blue ridge mountains and saw many trees covered in these 'tent's'. I thought they were normal for North America. This was in may/june.
Terry, you write that it's unusual. Is that because of the timing? Since it's already mid august?
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #170 on: August 13, 2019, 01:12:37 PM »
Anecdotal but when I was a kid highway driving would spatter your windshield with bugs. Now there are hardly any.
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gerontocrat

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #171 on: August 13, 2019, 01:44:20 PM »
Interesting animals: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tent_caterpillar

In '94 I had a nice drive with a friend in his jagV12convertible  :-X over the blue ridge mountains and saw many trees covered in these 'tent's'. I thought they were normal for North America. This was in may/june.
Terry, you write that it's unusual. Is that because of the timing? Since it's already mid august?
It looks very late to me for caterpillars of any description.

Quote
https://www.manitoulin.ca/predicting-the-forest-tent-caterpillar-population-in-2019/
The forest tent caterpillar is a common and natural insect herbivore across central and southern Canada. Its preferred hosts are aspen poplar, birch, maple and ash. In most years, populations remain low and small clusters are found widely dispersed in forests with rapid increases in populations usually prevented by the actions of parasitic wasps and flies.

However, for poorly understood reasons, the numbers start to increase dramatically every 10-12 years and host trees are heavily defoliated. Fortunately, healthy trees are usually not harmed during such outbreaks and produce new leaves about two weeks after the defoliation.

Caterpillars hatch in early spring and start feeding on newly flushed leaves. They grow rapidly in the next five to seven weeks becoming full grown by mid-June.
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TerryM

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #172 on: August 13, 2019, 02:15:28 PM »
As kids (teens) we built small fires under affected trees, sawed off the branch carefully & incinerated the bugs that were thought of as tree killers.
Good to learn they don't actually do much harm to healthy trees.


I haven't seen these amounts since 2004 when I returned to Canada - actually I've seen very few since my return. Perhaps it is a natural cycle that I'm winessing.
Terry


Sebastian Jones

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #173 on: August 13, 2019, 06:47:55 PM »
Bolsonaro approves 290 new pesticide products.
Also, 1,942 registered pesticides were quickly reevaluated, with the number considered extremely toxic dropped from 702 to just 43.
https://news.mongabay.com/2019/08/bolsonaro-administration-approves-290-new-pesticide-products-for-use/
I think it is important to bear in mind that ALL pesticides are toxic. The reason is because they are literally designed to be toxic, so that they can kill things.

It is difficult to imagine that the liberal spraying of poisons all around the world could happen without actually killing a whole lot of organisms, and stupid to think that only the organism that has been condemned to death will be killed and naive to think that there will not be unintended consequences from removing a species from the biosphere.

vox_mundi

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #174 on: August 14, 2019, 12:38:12 AM »
Goodbye Monarchs? Protection Changes Imperil Butterflies
https://m.phys.org/news/2019-08-goodbye-monarchs-imperil-butterflies.html

The Trump administration's new order weakening the Endangered Species Act could well make things worse for the monarch, one of more than 1 million species that are struggling around the globe.

With its count falling 99% to the low tens of thousands in the western United States last year, the monarch is now under government consideration for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. But if the Trump administration's latest action survives threatened legal challenges, there will be sweeping changes to how the government provides protections, and which creatures receive them.

Administration officials say the changes, expected to go into effect next month, will reduce regulation while still protecting animals and plants. But conservation advocates and Democratic lawmakers say the overhaul will force more to extinction, delaying and denying protections.

The administration will for the first time reserve the option to estimate and publicize the financial cost of saving a species in advance of any decision on whether to do so. Monarchs compete for habitat with soybean and corn farmers, whose crops are valued in the low tens of billions of dollars annually. For mountain caribou, sage grouse, the Humboldt marten in California's old-growth redwoods and other creatures, it's logging, oil and gas development, ranching, and other industry driving struggling species out of their ranges.

Another coming change will end across-the-board protections for creatures newly listed as threatened. Conservation groups say that will leave them unprotected for months or years, as officials, conservationists and industries and landowners hash out each species' survival plan, case by case.

The rule also will limit consideration of threats facing a species to the "foreseeable" future, which conservation groups say allows the administration to ignore the growing harm of global warming. Along with farming, climate change is one of the main drivers of the monarch's threatened extinction, disrupting an annual 3,000-mile migration synched to springtime and the blossoming of wildflowers. In 2002, a single wet storm followed by a freeze killed an estimated 450 million monarchs in their winter home in Mexico, piling wings inches deep on a forest floor.

A decision on whether the monarch will be listed as threatened is expected by December 2020.

--------------------


So long, it's been good to know ya
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

nanning

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #175 on: August 14, 2019, 07:32:54 AM »
Quote
the financial cost of saving a species
>:( :'(

We are a species. What is the financial cost of saving us? Can we afford it?
How would Rachel Carson have described this?
Sorry for the off-topic
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TerryM

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #176 on: August 14, 2019, 08:33:27 AM »
Quote
the financial cost of saving a species
 >:( :'(

We are a species. What is the financial cost of saving us? Can we afford it?
How would Rachel Carson have described this?
Sorry for the off-topic
Perhaps we could bid up some of our personal favorites?
I'll give you 3 black rhino herds and 7 Tazmanian devils for 10,000 monarchs butterflies.
Terry

nanning

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Re: Decline in insect populations
« Reply #177 on: August 14, 2019, 09:02:17 AM »
That's not fair Terry. I give you 10000 and you only give me 10 back. Oh, you wrote "herds". Anyway they are far too expensive.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly"