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Author Topic: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism  (Read 79938 times)

TerryM

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Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1050 on: October 27, 2019, 02:29:21 PM »
FREE JULIAN ASSANGE


https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2019/10/26/span-o26.html


Perfidious Albion now obstructs Spanish investigation into CIA's spying on Julian!


If enough Brits & Ausies wrote to their MPs it might have an effect.
Terry



blumenkraft

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Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1051 on: October 27, 2019, 04:27:06 PM »
Extremely good!

The Alt-Right Playbook: How to Radicalize a Normie

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TerryM

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Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1052 on: October 29, 2019, 02:09:19 PM »
Max Blumenthal was picked up in a SWAT raid and held without access to a lawyer over the weekend.


https://thegrayzone.com/2019/10/28/this-charge-is-one-hundred-percent-false-grayzone-editor-max-blumenthal-arrested-months-after-reporting-on-venezuelan-opposition-violence/


Journalism, particularly by journalists that don't toe the government's line, is an increasingly dangerous occupation in the US of A.


Free Assange
Terry


Reginald

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Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1053 on: October 30, 2019, 03:09:55 AM »
I watched this the other day:

https://www.thebrainwashingofmydad.com/

It provides a nice history of the right's media efforts over the last century or so, and has a happy ending!

sidd

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Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1054 on: November 01, 2019, 08:56:16 PM »
Brilliant expose of the commoditization of language: Newspeak is here

"In poetry and other forms of literature, words acquire value based on the type of emotions, mental landscapes and history they evoke. For Google algorithm however, the value of a word fluctuates according to the power of the industry that uses and advertises it ... emotionless commodification of language has helped Google become one the most successful and wealthy companies in the world."

"I wanted to give language its agency back as human, emotive language, rather than as a training set, or as a vehicle for the flow of advertising capital around digital spaces, which is what it is increasingly becoming."

"linguistic capitalism occurs when the economic value of words – their exchange value – negates their value in their communicative, or aesthetic sense, with potential collateral effects on the wider discourse. :

"if words are now tied to an economic derivative value that is more and more distanced and decontextualized from its other – more liquid – values, then do they risk becoming subprime?"

"in Oceania, this control of language is overtly deployed as a means of controlling thought, whereas in linguistic capitalism, the political and social effects of this semantic determinism go largely unnoticed, or are somehow dismissed as a quirk, a glitch, or as an acceptable trade-off for the wider perceived benefits of Google’s systems."

" we are lulled into a sense that we have any control or agency by the aesthetics and ubiquity of technologies like Google, and more and more this has extreme political consequences. "

Read the whole interview with Dr. Thornton:

https://we-make-money-not-art.com/linguistic-capitalism/

In fact, read her dissertation:

https://pure.royalholloway.ac.uk/portal/files/33473592/THORNTON_THESIS_FINALFINAL.pdf

sidd


sidd

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Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1055 on: November 02, 2019, 12:59:24 AM »
Hasan interviews Chomsky at the intercept:

" they’re going after Trump not on his major crimes but because he went after a leading Democrat. Does that remind you of anything? Yes. Watergate. They didn’t go after Nixon on his major crimes. They were off the record. It was because he had attacked the Democratic party. "

"Is it the right thing to do? I mean, Trump is impeachable 100 times over. You know, he’s a major crook. There’s no doubt about it. Is it politically wise? I frankly doubt it."

"Bernie Sanders is a decent person. I like what he’s doing. To be quite frank, his major policies would not have surprised President Eisenhower very much. He’s a progressive, New Deal Democrat. Politics has shifted so far to the right during the neoliberal period that things that were sort of conventional and mainstream 50-60 years ago now sound radical. "

https://theintercept.com/2019/10/31/deconstructed-special-the-noam-chomsky-interview/

sidd


https://theintercept.com/2019/10/31/deconstructed-special-the-noam-chomsky-interview/

blumenkraft

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Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1056 on: November 02, 2019, 07:39:33 AM »
Why Republican/Democratic politics is bad >>




Why Bernie's politics is good >>

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blumenkraft

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Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1057 on: November 02, 2019, 08:13:56 AM »
Hasan interviews Chomsky at the intercept:

Great podcast, just listened to it. Thanks for sharing, Sidd.
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nanning

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Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1058 on: November 02, 2019, 08:23:53 AM »
Yes, thank you very much for your very interesting, important and high morality postings sidd, also in the economic inequality thread :)
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
   Simple: minimize your possessions and be free and kind    It's just a mindset.       Refugees welcome

sidd

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Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1059 on: November 05, 2019, 01:44:47 AM »
Johnstone on propaganda:

" framing more and more debates in terms of how the oligarchic empire should be sustained and supported, steering them away from debates about whether that empire should be permitted to exist at all."

"They get people debating whether they should elect a crook in a red hat or a crook in a blue hat, rather than whether or not they should be forced to elect crooks."

"They get people debating whether or not a group of protesters are sufficiently polite, rather than debating the thing those protesters are demonstrating against."

"They get people debating how many US troops should be in Syria, rather than whether that illegal invasion and occupation was ever legitimate in the first place."

"They get people debating how much government support the poor should be allowed to have, rather than whether the rich should be allowed to keep what they’ve stolen from the poor.
'
"They get people debating whether Fox or MSNBC is the real “fake news”, rather than whether the entirety of mainstream media is oligarchic propaganda."

"They get people shoving against each other in opposite directions, while they swiftly build a cage around us all."

https://caitlinjohnstone.com/2019/11/04/the-incredible-shrinking-overton-window/

sidd

nanning

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Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1060 on: November 05, 2019, 08:29:25 AM »
Thanks sidd for that gem.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
   Simple: minimize your possessions and be free and kind    It's just a mindset.       Refugees welcome

vox_mundi

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Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1061 on: November 06, 2019, 06:10:36 PM »
Group Says Misinformation On the Rise On Facebook
https://techxplore.com/news/2019-11-group-misinformation-facebook.html

... The group found that, collectively, fake stories were posted more than 2.3 million times and had an estimated 158.9 million views, along with 8.9 million likes, comments and shares. The false stories targeted both political parties, though Avaaz says the majority were against Democrats and liberals.

Avaaz said in the report that the findings are the "tip of the iceberg of disinformation" ahead of the 2020 elections.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

sidd

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Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1062 on: Today at 01:10:23 AM »
This post could go in several threads, but it fits here.

Graeber reviews Skidelsky at nyrb: economics is no longer fit for purpose

"beginning to look like a science designed to solve problems that no longer exist."

"We now live in a different economic universe than we did before the crash. Falling unemployment no longer drives up wages. Printing money does not cause inflation. Yet the language of public debate, and the wisdom conveyed in economic textbooks, remain almost entirely unchanged."

"There are plenty of magic money trees in Britain, as there are in any developed economy. They are called “banks.” "

"an astounding 85 percent of members of Parliament had no idea where money really came from (most appeared to be under the impression that it was produced by the Royal Mint). "

"The one thing it never seemed to occur to anyone to do was to get a job at a bank, and find out what actually happens when someone asks to borrow money. In 2014 a German economist named Richard Werner did exactly that, and discovered that, in fact, loan officers do not check their existing funds, reserves, or anything else. They simply create money out of thin air, or, as he preferred to put it, “fairy dust.”"

"demanding that the technocrats charged with running the system base all policy decisions on false assumptions about something as elementary as the nature of money becomes a little like demanding that architects proceed on the understanding that the square root of 47 is actually π."

"the Bank of England (the British equivalent of the Federal Reserve, whose economists are most free to speak their minds since they are not formally part of the government) rolled out an elaborate official report called “Money Creation in the Modern Economy,” replete with videos and animations, making the same point: existing economics textbooks, and particularly the reigning monetarist orthodoxy, are wrong. The heterodox economists are right. Private banks create money. Central banks like the Bank of England create money as well, but monetarists are entirely wrong to insist that their proper function is to control the money supply. In fact, central banks do not in any sense control the money supply"

"Central banks in Norway, Switzerland, and Germany quickly put out similar papers. Back in the UK, the immediate media response was simply silence. The Bank of England report has never, to my knowledge, been so much as mentioned on the BBC or any other TV news outlet. Newspaper columnists continued to write as if monetarism was self-evidently correct. Politicians continued to be grilled about where they would find the cash for social programs. It was as if a kind of entente cordiale had been established, in which the technocrats would be allowed to live in one theoretical universe, while politicians and news commentators would continue to exist in an entirely different one."

"it would be unwise to ignore the possibility that something historic is afoot."

"Accordingly, one of the most significant books to come out of the UK in recent years would have to be Robert Skidelsky’s Money and Government: The Past and Future of Economics. Ostensibly an attempt to answer the question of why mainstream economics rendered itself so useless in the years immediately before and after the crisis of 2008, it is really an attempt to retell the history of the economic discipline through a consideration of the two things—money and government—that most economists least like to talk about."

"Is money best conceived of as a physical commodity, a precious substance used to facilitate exchange, or is it better to see money primarily as a credit, a bookkeeping method or circulating IOU—in any case, a social arrangement? This is an argument that has been going on in some form for thousands of years. What we call “money” is always a mixture of both"

"According to Skidelsky, the pattern was to repeat itself again and again, in 1797, the 1840s, the 1890s, and, ultimately, the late 1970s and early 1980s, with Thatcher and Reagan’s (in each case brief) adoption of monetarism. Always we see the same sequence of events:

 (1) The government adopts hard-money policies as a matter of principle.
 (2) Disaster ensues.
 (3) The government quietly abandons hard-money policies.
 (4) The economy recovers.
 (5) Hard-money philosophy nonetheless becomes, or is reinforced as, simple universal common sense. "

"How was it possible to justify such a remarkable string of failures? Here a lot of the blame, according to Skidelsky, can be laid at the feet of the Scottish philosopher David Hume. "

"there’s absolutely no reason a modern state should fund itself primarily by appropriating a proportion of each citizen’s earnings. There are plenty of other ways to go about it. Many—such as land, wealth, commercial, or consumer taxes (any of which can be made more or less progressive)—are considerably more efficient, since creating a bureaucratic apparatus capable of monitoring citizens’ personal affairs to the degree required by an income tax system is itself enormously expensive. But this misses the real point: income tax is supposed to be intrusive and exasperating. It is meant to feel at least a little bit unfair. Like so much of classical liberalism (and contemporary neoliberalism), it is an ingenious political sleight of hand—an expansion of the bureaucratic state that also allows its leaders to pretend to advocate for small government."

“lunatic premises lead to mad conclusions”

"we were obliged to pretend that markets could not, by definition, be wrong"

 "There is a paradox here. On the one hand, the theory says that there is no point in trying to profit from speculation, because shares are always correctly priced and their movements cannot be predicted. But on the other hand, if investors did not try to profit, the market would not be efficient because there would be no self-correcting mechanism….

Secondly, if shares are always correctly priced, bubbles and crises cannot be generated by the market….

 This attitude leached into policy: “government officials, starting with [Federal Reserve Chairman] Alan Greenspan, were unwilling to burst the bubble precisely because they were unwilling to even judge that it was a bubble.” The EMH [Efficient Market Hypothesis]  made the identification of bubbles impossible because it ruled them out a priori. "

"After such a catastrophic embarrassment, orthodox economists fell back on their strong suit—academic politics and institutional power"

"If an “economy” is to be defined as the means by which a human population provides itself with its material needs, the British economy is increasingly dysfunctional. Frenetic efforts on the part of the British political class to change the subject (Brexit) can hardly go on forever. Eventually, real issues will have to be addressed."

https://www.nybooks.com/articles/2019/12/05/against-economics/

sidd