Support the Arctic Sea Ice Forum and Blog

Author Topic: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism  (Read 125810 times)

blumenkraft

  • Guest
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1150 on: May 21, 2020, 11:22:15 AM »
Spot on!

CNN Host Whines About Mean Trump Supporters As The Economy Implodes


sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1151 on: June 03, 2020, 06:27:00 AM »
Cornell West at guardian: a boot on the neck

"The increasing militarization of US society is inseparable from its imperial policies"

"The four catastrophes Martin Luther King Jr warned us about – militarism ...  poverty ... materialism ... and racism ... have laid bare the organised hatred, greed and corruption in the country"

"The weakness of the labor movement and the present difficulty of the radical left to unite around a nonviolent revolutionary project of democratic sharing and redistribution of power, wealth and respect are signs of a society unable to regenerate the best of its past and present."

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/jun/01/george-floyd-protests-cornel-west-american-democracy

sidd

Florifulgurator

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 378
  • Virtual world alter ego / अवतार of Martin Gisser
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 173
  • Likes Given: 121
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1152 on: June 15, 2020, 12:50:58 AM »
959 views... This video explains why I'm such a fan of Masha Gessen. She wrote a book about Grigori Perelman and one about Vladimir Putin without talking to either during doing the work (45:38 ff.). She would have been more excited to get a phone call from Perelman over meeting Putin later. One of the greatest journalists and polit psychopathologists of our times.

Google image search on my avatar image gives "wood". In fact it is the lower part of David Hilbert's tombstone.

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4357
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2471
  • Likes Given: 334
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1153 on: June 17, 2020, 11:43:29 PM »
Voice of America's Appointment of Trump Ally Sparks Purge Fears
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jun/17/voice-of-america-agency-purge-trump-ally-michael-pack

Quote
... "Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past."

George Orwell - 1984

Democrats have warned the new Trump-appointed head of the US global media agency, which oversees Voice of America (VOA) and other broadcasters, is planning a purge of career officials that could spell the end of its editorial independence.

... Earlier this month, Trump persuaded Republican senators to confirm Michael Pack, a conservative film-maker and associate of the rightwing ideologue Stephen Bannon, as the new head of the US Agency for Global Media (USAGM), even though Pack is currently under criminal investigation for allegedly diverting $1.6m in funds from a charity organisation he runs to his private film company, Manifold Productions.

... Trump appears to have been outraged that although VOA is funded by the federal government, he had not been able to control its output. The agency was set up in 1942 to counter Nazi propaganda and played a prominent role, alongside its sister-organisation, Radio Free Europe, in the cold war. After friction with the Nixon administration about what VOA was allowed to broadcast about Watergate, a charter was drawn up in 1976 intended to guarantee it remained “accurate, objective and comprehensive”.

The administration has accused the broadcaster of favouring Beijing in its coverage of the coronavirus pandemic, but the accusation was found to be groundless by independent media watchdog. Last week, the publication of internal messages from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, showed the health agency had been instructed to blacklist the VOA and not respond to its inquiries. The VOA covered the story on the “press freedom” section of its website.

https://www.voanews.com/press-freedom/cdc-media-guidance-blacklists-voa-interview-requests

In his Tuesday night statement warning of an imminent purge of career broadcasters, Engel said: “Mr Pack should immediately reverse course and allow the nonpartisan public servants who run USAGM to keep doing their jobs. And Mr Pack needs to understand that USAGM is not the ministry of information.”



Quote
... “What can you do, thought Winston, against the lunatic who is more intelligent than yourself; who gives your arguments a fair hearing and simply persists in his lunacy?”

George Orwell - 1984
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1154 on: June 18, 2020, 12:54:26 AM »
One media site i like to keep an eye on is "Watching America"

http://watchingamerica.com/

sidd

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4357
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2471
  • Likes Given: 334
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1155 on: June 18, 2020, 02:54:04 AM »
Another one is "The Smirking Chimp"

http://smirkingchimp.com/
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1156 on: July 03, 2020, 07:42:48 AM »
Wealth, Power and Plague: Russell and Parker at the conversation

"another less often remarked consequence of the Black Death was the rise of wealthy entrepreneurs and business-government links. Although the Black Death caused short-term losses for Europe’s largest companies, in the long term, they concentrated their assets and gained a greater share of the market and influence with governments. This has strong parallels with the current situation in many countries across the world. "

"The trend of the post-Black Death 14th and 15th centuries was a concentration of resources – capital, skills, and infrastructure – into the hands of a small number of corporations."

"The trend of the post-Black Death 14th and 15th centuries was a concentration of resources – capital, skills, and infrastructure – into the hands of a small number of corporations."

"When Italian mega-companies re-emerged in the late 14th and 15th centuries, they also benefited from the crown’s ever-growing reliance upon merchant companies. The Medici family, who eventually came to rule Florence, are the most striking example."

"In 2016, of the largest 100 economic entities, 31 were countries and 69 were companies. Walmart was larger than the economy of Spain, Toyota larger than India."

" thanks to coronavirus, the state has come rolling back in again like a tsunami. Spending on a level which was mocked as “magic money tree” economics only a few months ago has been aimed at national health systems, addressed the problem of homelessness, provided universal basic income for millions of people, and offered loan guarantees or direct payments to a host of businesses. "

"Ideas about balancing the budget appear to, for now, be history, with entire industries now being reliant on treasury bailouts. Politicians the world over have suddenly become interventionist"

"Less often remarked is the astonishing restriction on personal freedoms."

"states around the world have effectively restricted movement for the vast majority of people and are using the police and armed forces to prevent assembly in public and private spaces ... A medieval king would have been impressed with this level of authoritarianism."

"The state’s power is now being exercised in ways that haven’t been seen since the second world war, and there has been widespread public support. "

"the COVID-19 crisis questions this small is good, big is bad dichotomy in some very fundamental ways. Large scale organising has appeared to be necessary to deal with the huge range of issues that the virus has thrown up, and the states that appear to have been most successful are those which have adopted the most interventionist forms of surveillance and control. "

"The long-term result of the Black Death was the strengthening of the power of big business and the state. The same processes are happening much more rapidly during the coronavirus lockdown"

https://theconversation.com/how-pandemics-past-and-present-fuel-the-rise-of-mega-corporations-137732

sidd

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1157 on: July 08, 2020, 07:06:51 AM »
A motley crew at Harper's decry suppression of speech:

"resistance must not be allowed to harden into its own brand of dogma or coercion"

"an intolerance of opposing views, a vogue for public shaming and ostracism, and the tendency to dissolve complex policy issues in a blinding moral certainty. "

"calls for swift and severe retribution in response to perceived transgressions of speech and thought."

"Editors are fired for running controversial pieces; books are withdrawn for alleged inauthenticity; journalists are barred from writing on certain topics; professors are investigated for quoting works of literature in class; a researcher is fired for circulating a peer-reviewed academic study"

"the result has been to steadily narrow the boundaries of what can be said without the threat of reprisal. We are already paying the price"

"The restriction of debate, whether by a repressive government or an intolerant society, invariably hurts those who lack power ... The way to defeat bad ideas is by exposure, argument, and persuasion, not by trying to silence or wish them away. We refuse any false choice between justice and freedom, which cannot exist without each other. "

https://harpers.org/a-letter-on-justice-and-open-debate/

The list of signatories is ... interesting.

sidd

blumenkraft

  • Guest
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1158 on: July 08, 2020, 09:50:01 AM »
Sometimes, it's healthy for your media competency to also listen to how young people see the world. Get your brain unwashed here:

Talking with YouTuber Josephine Mathias - Free Speech, SJWs, Conservatism & More


sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1159 on: July 10, 2020, 09:37:28 AM »
we live in interesting times: national review editors defend yglesias at vox

"they’re going to make us defend Matthew @#$%&!ing Yglesias."

"the weaponization of victim status by vindictive, sophomoric busybodies who cannot bear the fact that someone else sees the world in a different way."

"These are dark times. More important, these are stupid times, and Matt Yglesias has contributed more than his share to that. But to treat his signature on a letter endorsing an open culture as a threat is, incredibly enough, more absurd than anything we can remember Yglesias himself having written."

https://www.nationalreview.com/2020/07/its-come-to-this-we-must-defend-matt-yglesias/

I don't often link to the national review for many reasons, but this almost onion level.

sidd

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1160 on: July 11, 2020, 03:19:31 AM »
Jogalekar on slippery slopes: "losing the war of ideas"

" my disillusionment has grown steadily over time "

"Cotton is a sitting United States senator after all, so as an elected public official his views needed to be known, not because they were right but because they were relevant"

"allow their readers to get out of their echo chambers and take a stroll in a foreign country,"

" fired for tweeting a study by a black professor at Princeton that said that non-violent protests are more effective than violent ones"

"Trump ... asked a journalist that if it was Lee today, would it be Jefferson or Washington next? I of course dismissed Trump’s remark as racist and ignorant ... now I am horrified that liberals are providing him with ample ammunition by validating his words."

" liberals are punishing someone who says that the world has at large become a better place because we have embraced liberal values. Again, this feels like we have stepped into a surreal mirror universe."

"a job for an incompetent and yet obsessive Orwellian bureaucrat or a member of the NKVD during Stalin’s show trials"

"If we went from Milo Yiannopoulos to Steven Pinker in three years, it simply does not feel paranoid to think that we could get to a very troubling place in three more years."

" This also puts in a dim light the objection that there cannot be speech without consequences ... if the results include getting fired or booted out from professional organizations for almost anything you say, these “consequences” are almost as draconian as government oppression "

" if you want to call yourself a liberal, act liberal."

http://wavefunction.fieldofscience.com/2020/07/on-free-speech-crossing-rubicon-and.html

sidd

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1161 on: August 12, 2020, 08:04:47 AM »
Latour, in translation by Howles (i cannot find the original french yet): Economy as format

"It would certainly be a shame to lose too quickly all the benefit of what Covid-19 has revealed to be essential.  ... there is at least one thing that everyone has been able to grasp: something is wrong with the economy. First of all, of course, because it seems that it can be suspended in one fell swoop; it no longer has the appearance of an irreversible movement that can neither slow down, nor by any means stop, without risk of catastrophe. Next, because all those in lockdown have noticed that class relations, which were solemnly declared to have been abrogated, have become as visible as they were in the time of Dickens or Proudhon"

"we are now saying that something is wrong in the way the economy defines the world."

"in certain recent societies, a concerted work of formatting has tried (without ever completely succeeding) to reduce and simplify these relations, to extract from them certain types of passion, affect, know-how, technique and invention, and to ignore all the others."

"The doubt that has been introduced during this hiatus is too profound; it has insinuated itself too widely"

"By himself, nobody becomes a detached individual, able to calculate a self-serving agenda and to enter into competition with everyone else in search of profit. These highlighted words identify properties that truly exist in the world, but only because they were first extracted, maintained, connected and assured by the immense assistance of accounting tools, title deeds, business schools and scholarly algorithms. Homo oeconomicus is just like a strain of bacteria cultivated in a petri-dish: it exists, but there is nothing natural, native or spontaneous about him. Alleviate the conditions, and see how it is emancipated"

"If the experience of the pandemic has any meaning, it’s to reveal the speed with which the notion of productivity has come to depend on accounting tools. Yes, it’s true, you can’t calculate the productivity of teachers, nurses, housewives very accurately. What conclusion do we draw from this? That they are unproductive? That they deserve to be paid less and kept at the bottom of the ladder? Or that it doesn’t matter, because this is not the issue? Whatever name you give to their “production”, it is both indispensable and incalculable; well, let others grapple with this contradiction; it simply means that these activities belong to a type of action that is non-economizable. The realisation by everybody that this resistance to countability is of “no importance” casts doubt on all other operations of economization. This is where the economic grip on the conditions of life breaks away from what it describes"

"A hiatus of just two months is all it took to achieve what numerous studies by sociologists of markets and anthropologists of finance would never have achieved: a widely-shared realization that the economy holds in place only as long as the institution that performs it – and not a day longer."

"This is the turning-point; this is the doubt; this is the point of no return: not what and how to produce, but is “producing” a good way of connecting to the world?"

"we have ended up questioning the value and politics of life – what makes it possible, what sustains it, what makes it liveable and just."

"we began to see proliferate in full view the work of these “forgotten people” [petites gens], who we noticed, more and more every day, were indispensable – here was a return to the question of class relations, clearly racialized. There was also the return of hard geopolitical relations and of inequalities between countries, made visible (this has also been one of the enduring lessons) product by product, value chain by value chain, migration route by migration route. As a third stage, employment hierarchies have been shaken up: we began to notice a thousand qualities in less well-paid, less well-regarded jobs, the ones demanding care, attention and multiple precautions."

"even fathers working remotely noticed that to teach arithmetic to their children required a thousand qualities of patience and obstinacy, the importance of which they had never suspected."

"The formatting provided by economization, just as was the case for asepsis, had precisely as its goal to multiply preventative measures in order to limit the number of beings to be taken into account, in every sense of the word. It sought to prevent proliferation, to obtain pure cultures, to simplify the grounds for action, which was the only way to make microbes or humans knowable, calculable and manageable."

"Without this other crisis, the pandemic would probably have been addressed as a serious public health challenge, but not as an existential question: people in lockdown would have been cautious about infection, but would not have set about discussing whether it was really useful to produce aeroplanes, to continue cruising on giant ships that look like container vessels, or to expect Argentina to provide the soya required for Breton pigs. The new climactic regime, when superimposed upon the health crisis, casts such fundamental doubt upon the whole question of production that it took only two months of lockdown for the issue to be reinvigorated."

"If the health crisis has reminded us of the role of these forgotten jobs [petits métiers], if it has given new significance to the caring professions, if it made class relations more visible, it has also gradually reminded us of the importance of those other participants in our ways of life, first microbes, and then, one thing leading to another, all that is needed to maintain in good condition an economy we had hitherto supposed constituted the totality of experience and that would recover. Even the most obtuse reporter, who continues to contrast those who care about the climate with those who simply wish to “restock the fridge”, can no longer ignore the fact that there is nothing in the fridge that does not depend on the climate – not to mention the countless microorganisms associated with the fermentation of cheese, yoghurt and beer."

"[Graeber] the idea of the labour theory of value was self-evident in the nineteenth-century, before disappearing under the neoliberal barrage of the twentieth, a century that was so forgetful of the conditions of life"

"the world that is now appearing in the full light of day, absolutely refusing to accept the status of “mere resource” granted to it condescendingly by the standard definition of the economy and breaking through all the preventative measures that should have keep it distanced."

"Underneath the capitalists are the workers, and underneath the workers are living things!"

"where we thought we should have an Economic Recovery, instead we will probably have to learn to exit from the Economy, that simplified summary of forms of life."

Read the whole thing, and let me know if you find the original french, please.

www.bruno-latour.fr/sites/default/files/downloads/P-205-ECONOMISATION-AOC-GB_1.pdf

sidd

Neven

  • Administrator
  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 7758
    • View Profile
    • Arctic Sea Ice Blog
  • Liked: 1134
  • Likes Given: 526
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1162 on: August 12, 2020, 10:31:43 AM »
sidd, thank you so much for posting this. I've posted it in the Lessons from COVID-19 thread, as it fits in even better there. Absolutely top-notch, as well as the translation.
Il faut comparer, comparer, comparer, et cultiver notre jardin

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1163 on: August 12, 2020, 09:06:08 PM »
Latour is usually worth reading. I do wish i could find the french version tho, even the best translation must make uncomfortable choices. Altho french/english is one of the easier language pairs to translate.

The whole article is good, one of the passages that remained with me is:

"By himself, nobody becomes a detached individual, able to calculate a self-serving agenda and to enter into competition with everyone else in search of profit. These highlighted words identify properties that truly exist in the world, but only because they were first extracted, maintained, connected and assured by the immense assistance of accounting tools, title deeds, business schools and scholarly algorithms. Homo oeconomicus is just like a strain of bacteria cultivated in a petri-dish: it exists, but there is nothing natural, native or spontaneous about him. Alleviate the conditions, and see how it is emancipated"

Indeed.

sidd

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1164 on: August 16, 2020, 09:04:08 AM »
Reed and Michaels at commondreams: racism and inequality in the USA

"not only will a focus on the effort to eliminate racial disparities not take us in the direction of a more equal society, it isn't even the best way of eliminating racial disparities themselves."

"extant racism isn't what principally produces our inequality and anti-racism won't eliminate it. And because racism is not the principal source of inequality today, anti-racism functions more as a misdirection that justifies inequality than a strategy for eliminating it."

"Two plausible but false beliefs: that racial disparities can in fact be eliminated by anti-racism and that, if they could be, their elimination would make the U.S. a more equal society"

" The lack of progress in overcoming the white/black wealth gap has been a function of the increase in the rich/poor wealth gap."

"The top 10% of white people have 75% of white wealth; the top 20% have virtually all of it. And the same is true for black wealth. The top 10% of black households hold 75% of black wealth."

"the overall racial wealth disparity is driven almost entirely by the disparity between the wealthiest 10 percent of white people and the wealthiest 10 percent of black people."

"when you tell the 80 percent of white people who have less than 15 percent of white wealth that the basic inequality in the U.S. is between black and white, they know you are wrong. More tellingly, if you say the same thing to the 80 percent of black people in the same position, they also know you're wrong.  It's not white people who have white wealth; it's the top ten percent of whites, plus some Blacks and Asians. The wealth gap among all but the wealthiest blacks and whites is dwarfed by the class gap, the difference between the wealthiest and everyone else across the board."

"Trying to solve the problem of racial disparity thus has nothing to do with producing economic equality; rather, it replaces the goal of equality with the goal of proportional inequality."

"Complaints about disproportionality are neoliberal math. They tell us that the increasing wealth of the one percent would be okay if only there were more black, brown, and LGBTQIA+ billionaires."

"all the rich people eager to embark on a course of moral purification that will make them less racist but with no interest whatsoever in a politics that would make them less rich."

"not a more just society, just a differently unjust one. That's the trouble with disparity."

https://www.commondreams.org/views/2020/08/15/trouble-disparity

sidd

The Walrus

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 780
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 106
  • Likes Given: 62
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1165 on: August 16, 2020, 01:42:22 PM »
Very enlightening Sidd

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1166 on: August 18, 2020, 01:16:02 AM »
Hartman-Caverly dives into QAnon: the librarian's dilemma

" Conspiracy  theorists  pose  a  danger  to  themselves  and  others  when  those  ideas  migrate  from  their  digital  margins  into  social  and  broadcast media, thereby polluting public discourse.[10] In Sunstein and Vermeule’s view,  open  democratic  societies  buttressed  by  a  free  and  independent  press  are  antithetical to the conditions that harbor conspiracies; therefore, conspiracy the-ories about such societies must be false on their face, warranting no further con-sideration.[11] There’s just one problem. Sunstein and Vermeule are wrong.[12]"

"Participants in the QAnon Storm conspiracy community engage with a broad range  of  information  sources,  using  sophisticated  techniques  to  synthesize  and  communicate  their  findings.  "

"Anons  also  debate  the  quality  of  sources  referenced  and  validity  of  interpre-tations  proposed;  posts  are  excluded  or  removed  from  the  notables  archive  when  deemed deficient in supporting evidence or logic. They review, critique, build upon"

"he  anons  have  established  a  virtual  community  of  practice  around  shared  information behaviors, standards, and values, encompassing a research library, an identity  management  mechanism,  and  a  format  for  publishing  findings  utilizing  open  source  tools,  open  access  information,  and  uncompensated  crowdsourced  research labor. What makes them conspiracy theorists is not their crippled epistemologies, but their differential hermeneutics."

"Conspiracy theories emerge from the interplay between two key ingredients: secrecy  and  power—the  same  two  ingredients  that  comprise  the  modern  bu-reaucratic state.[19] Since the crystallization of covert intelligence operations in the United States during and after World War II, the size and scope of the bureaucracy of secrecy have ballooned and burrowed into nearly every dynamic of daily life.20Steeped as we are in this ubiquitous, anonymous bureaucracy, the seemingly supernatural forces of secrecy and power infuse our lived experiences; we exist in a state of suspended disbelief regarding the inverse relationship between privacy—our exercise of personal secrecy—and state power."

"Mainstream  coverage  surrounding  conservative  allegations  of  social  media  censorship  is  often  skeptical,  depicting  the  concerns  as  paranoid;  or  smug,  concluding that banning techniques are valid and deserved given the private companies’ terms of service agreements.[33] A lternative media provide a very different picture."

"online censorship techniques deployed by private social media companies independent of government efforts are supported by a majority of Democratic-leaning respondents, as well as nearly half of conservatives."

"n  1967,  foreign  media  carried  out  a  CI A  directive  to  vilify  Warren  Commission  skeptics  as  Soviet  propagandists—and this is the origin story for our modern usage of the term conspiracy theorist"

"A close reading of the coverage reveals what these commentators find note-worthy about the conspiracy, how they choose to frame those observations, and, from an insider perspective, what they choose to omit. The discourse aligns closely with that of the New York Times’s treatment of conspiracy theories dating back to the fateful 1967 directive from the CIA."

"With  nothing  more  than  the  Socratic  method,  Q  marshalled  millions  to  participate  in  a  massive-scale  distributed  civic  research  project"

"the  anons  have  collectively  researched  and documented a sprawling web of people, places, and events on interconnect-ed themes ranging from international corruption schemes to human trafficking, composing open source proofs. I watched as they organized a Resources Library of  free  research  tools  featuring  familiar  sites  like  OpenSecrets.org  for  delving  into  campaign  finance  disclosures,  the  SEC’s  EDGA R  database  and  Hoovers.com for researching corporate structures and activities, the Global Incident Map for monitoring natural and manmade disasters, and even the Library of Congress for access to back issues of the Federal Register. They organized a sequential series of  general  discussion  threads  and  opened  dedicated  topical  research  boards  as  the  need  arose,  developed  a  reproducible  method  for  nominating  and  selecting  notable posts to be archived, peer-reviewed and built upon each other’s investi-gations, and shared online sites for validating and communicating their findings, including reverse image lookups, mapping tools, and data visualization sites."

"nons  found  that  it  is  one  thing  to  be  lied  to, and another thing entirely to be lied about. "

"a nearly universal distrust  of  corporate  news.  On  this  the  anons  are  more  normative  than  they  might otherwise seem. Public polling data reveals a resurgence of the credibility gap that characterized the dynamic between government policy, journalism, and  public  perception  in  the  1960s  and  1970s.[54]  Strong  majorities  across  the  political spectrum view the media as biased. (Perhaps this is one thing we can all agree on.)"

"These same propaganda initiatives that the CI A once kept secret are now the public policy of all three branches of government, established first by executive or-der, then enabling statute, and recently upheld in federal court"

"A 2011 executive order established the Integrated Strategic Counterterrorism Communications Initiative to coordinate the activities of the Counterterrorism Center of the CI A and other executive branch agencies, including the dissemination of propaganda ostensibly targeting terrorists and extremists  abroad.[71]  Shortly  thereafter,  the  National  Defense  Authorization  Act  (NDAA) for fiscal year 2013 contained a version of the Smith-Mundt Modernization Act lifting the Cold War–era ban on domestic distribution of state-sponsored propaganda intended for foreign audiences.[72] In early 2016, a new executive order superseded the Integrated Strategic Counterterrorism Communications Initiative with  the  development  of  the  Integrated  Global  Engagement  Center,[73]  outlining  the  development  of  evidence-based  countermessaging  programs  for  international audiences (which, under Smith-Mundt modernization, could also be broadcast within  the  US),  and  establishing  networks  of  nongovernmental  partners  to  “disseminate messaging products to foreign audiences abroad."

"NDAA 2017 broadens the center’s focus again to include countering “non-state propaganda efforts aimed at undermining US national security interests” with “fact-based narratives.”[76]  It  also  creates  an  Information  Access  Fund  to  provide  grants  to  a  broad range of institutions, including “civil society groups, media content provid-ers, nongovernmental organizations, federally funded research and development centers, private companies, or academic institutions” for the purposes of supporting local independent media outside of the US, collecting examples of propaganda directed  at  US  audiences,  analyzing  and  reporting  on  tactics  of  disinformation  and  propaganda,  and  to  counter  foreign  efforts  to  influence  US  policy  or  social  or political stability through the manipulation of information.[77] Most recently, a federal judge issued a 2018 ruling that protects the CIA’s ability to selectively disclose information to individual journalists but redact the same information from the public record when responding to FOI A requests."

"“Fake news” is so often framed as an issue of public trust in the media that we fail to consider whether the public might have a point."

"Permeating the firewalls of our libraries’ resource-sharing networks is a fragile epistemological ecosystem—polluted from above, by surveillance and propaganda from multinational state intelligence agencies and corporate influence brokers; from  alongside,  by  social  surveillance  and  mutual  disciplining  into  ideological  identity groups self-policed for wrongthink; and from below, by sousveillance and memetic  psyops  from  a  decentralized  network  of  digital  minutemen  and  chaos  mongers.  "

"Given  the  defining  characteristic  of  gray  propaganda  as  a  strategic  distribution of truth tainted with lies, I am newly cautious to dismiss facts simply on the basis that they are enmeshed in fictions. By extension, the more ad hominem attacks  I  see  elected  officials  and  establishment  media  lob  at  upstart  self-declared  citizen  journalists,  the  more  curious  I  am  as  to  the  establishment’s  motivation.  "

"We can no more anticipate where a disruptive truth will come from than we can identify the truisms we currently accept as fact that will be subject to future correction"

"The domain of information is a battleground of asymmetric warfare.[85] Allegiance  is  a  strategic  liability,  today’s  allies  are  tomorrows  spies,  the  ubiquity  of  the  network  compromises  all  safe  zones,  and  multilateral  cooperation  flouting  national laws means there are no rules.[86] Citizens are targets as well as operatives. "

"The mind-set of a conspiracy theorist is a positive adaptation to a hostile bureaucracy  and  weaponized  information  environment;  an  indigenous  knowledge  of industrial states. Skepticism toward consensus views, suspicion of official narratives, discomfort with conformity, openness to alternative theories, an ability to articulate a null hypothesis followed by inductive pursuit of the fact pattern wherever it leads, can all serve as self-defense tactics for a disinformation campaign."

"At  our  best,  librarians  are  the  medics  of  information  war,  rescuing  and  sustaining the truth without regard for ideological loyalty. But how often have I been an unwitting propagandist instead?"

https://pennstate.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/truth-always-wins-dispatches-from-the-information-war

https://pennstate.pure.elsevier.com/files/75862603/HartmanCaverly_LibsPromReflDial_Ch9TruthAlwaysWins.pdf

sidd


sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1167 on: August 18, 2020, 07:12:13 AM »
hipcrimevocab on elections in futility: the market is protected from democracy

"politicians have been signed up to this kind of pro-market way of thinking about the economy"

"a back-to-the-future retread of Classical English Liberalism, or laissez-faire, which was the prevailing economic philosophy up until the Gilded Age"

"democracy without democracy. Its the trappings of democracy without any possibility of a popular majority really bringing about a change to the market system."

"that’s why people don’t bother voting—because it doesn’t really change anything. This is by design!"

"all we are left to fight over is meaningless “culture war” issues: transgender bathrooms, abortion, guns, gay marriage, drug use, racist jokes, cancel culture, and other such idiotic bullshit. Our leaders are okay with us fighting over this stuff, because it doesn’t affect their wealth or their bottom line. They can go on strip mining society to increase their wealth with impunity."

"When you are powerless to change the economic conditions you live under, “values” are the only thing left to vote on. Thus you get the rise of so-called “values voters.” "

[Andrew Yang]: "you’re with this person in Ohio and you’re like, ‘Hey get out and vote!’ They look at you, and they’re like, ‘this does not fucking matter to me at all.’ Like, my vote does not matter. And they have in many cases decades of experience telling them just that. "

"The voters that Yang talked to during his presidential campaign told him, in essence, My vote does not fucking matter. They know this is true, because the market is insulated from democracy. And Yang can’t really dispute this. From the standpoint of the voters, its totally rational not to vote. After all, they’ve reliably gone out and voted year after year after year. If they’re old enough, they’ve lived through the switch from Democratic control to Republican control back to Democratic control, back to Republican control, and what’s changed for them, really? Nothing! As Joe Biden assured wealthy donors: Nothing will fundamentally change."

" the Danes—then you’re perfectly willing to hand over fifty percent of your income and let them provide public goods. If you’re the United States or the United Kingdom, there’s pretty good reasons for not believing that these people know what the hell they’re doing, and you don’t want to hand them that chunk of change. "

"Polanyi argued that an attempt to create a “pure” market society separate from politics would lead to “the destruction of society.” People would not tolerate being subjected to the whims of the market—of watching their livelihoods be destroyed, of watching their businesses go under, of watching people be priced out of their homes"

There is much more. Read the whole thing:

http://hipcrimevocab.com/2020/08/10/neoliberal-democracy-and-the-futility-of-elections/#comment-893

sidd

nanning

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2401
  • 0Kg CO₂, 37 KWh/wk,125L H₂O/wk, No offspring
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 304
  • Likes Given: 20397
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1168 on: August 18, 2020, 09:19:58 AM »
Re: conspiracy theories

But conspiracies do exist. In an era of disinformation, fake news, normalized lying, anti-science, anti-truth, mass manipulation, advanced a.i., high surveillance, "1984", "The Matrix" etc. it is difficult to know under what system or threat you are because most media, most politicians and very rich people cannot be trusted on their words and motives. This is when one tries to see patterns, operating systems and dogmas in the information one gets/researches.

In my experience, the danger is that humans see patterns where there are no patterns because of bias or no complete context (scope, all variables). It is very important for truth finding (finding a conspiracy) to use calibration and the scientific method. Create as many possible patterns (hypotheses) as you learn more and more with feedback. So new info contradicts a hypothesis?-> check info, remove hypothesis. New info supports a hypothesis?-> check info, strengthen that hypothesis. All the time analysing and testing and - very important - doubt, doubt, doubt, check, recheck, search for correlations and associations and check those too and then doubt.
Without a correct classification system you will never see (unbiased) clear patterns.

To add: Pattern finding in politics/finance/economics is extremely hard because of the chaotic non-rational nature of those fields. Psychology and psychiatry knowledge should be used because most people high up are insane and kaput humans.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1169 on: September 06, 2020, 07:27:31 AM »
Dore moderates a heavyweight panel: Walker, Chomsky, Ellsberg on Assange

Chomsky is not long for this wolrd. One hour. watch the whole thing.



sidd

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1170 on: September 17, 2020, 07:09:43 AM »
Nolan at antiwar: unbelievable

"can you believe our president? The congress? How about the MSM?"

" Truth, today, is manufactured in the bowels of the corporations. Some call it the deep state."

"Now, if you’re not an idiot savant, you’ll have to take the word of others, like the guys down at the CIA. But the CIA lied us through Vietnam, to the tune 55,000 lives. For good measure, they lied us through Central America, Chile and all kinds of places. "

"So, who are you supposed to believe? "

"The propaganda machine had become an inescapable bubble. "

"But why don’t they listen to CNN? ... That’s an easy one. They don’t believe CNN. "

https://www.antiwar.com/blog/2020/09/15/trouble-in-tuscaloosa/

sidd

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4357
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2471
  • Likes Given: 334
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1171 on: September 17, 2020, 03:24:34 PM »
Increase in alcohol-industry funded research is a cause for concern, study suggests
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-09-alcohol-industry-funded.html

The alcohol industry is increasingly funding academic research into the impacts of alcohol consumption—with some studies making claims about the health benefits of alcohol, new research suggests.

The study found that since 2009, there has been a 56% increase in research funded by alcohol companies or affiliated organisations.

The scale of alcohol industry sponsorship of scientific research raises concerns over the potential for bias, conflicts of interest and selective reporting of outcomes, the researchers say.

... Many of these studies make claims about the protective cardiovascular effects of alcohol and suggest that substance abuse problems are down to individual choices rather than industry behaviours."

The research team from the University of York found just under 13,500 studies are directly or indirectly funded by the alcohol industry.

"Our study identified a worrying trend—While there has been a steep decline in the alcohol industry conducting its own research on health at the same time there has been an increase in the alcohol industry funding such research, by providing financial support to researchers or via alcohol related organisations.

"This allows alcohol companies to exploit a 'transparency loophole' as many people assume these organisations are charities and don't realise the connection to the industry.

... "It is well known that by sponsoring research pharmaceutical and tobacco companies successfully conspired to subvert the scientific evidence-base in order to influence policy for decades and so, while more research is needed, the scale, nature and breadth of the alcohol industry's influence on scientific research provides cause for concern.

The researchers believe that the level of alcohol industry involvement in research they uncovered is likely to be just the tip of the iceberg.

Su Golder et al, Declared funding and authorship by alcohol industry actors in the scientific literature: a bibliometric study, European Journal of Public Health (2020)
https://academic.oup.com/eurpub/advance-article/doi/10.1093/eurpub/ckaa172/5906182
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Tom_Mazanec

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 3906
  • Earth will survive AGW...but will Homo sapiens?
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 640
  • Likes Given: 377
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1172 on: September 23, 2020, 12:05:14 PM »
The Social Dilemma
https://www.thecatholicthing.org/2020/09/23/the-social-dilemma/
Quote
The problem, if you have friends on either side of such debates, as I do, is you regularly hear them dismissing the favored news source of the other side.  What seems impossible to convince either group of is that their news source is just as biased as the other side’s and that the people who go to the other news source are often doing so with the same desire to get “the truth.”
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1173 on: September 24, 2020, 11:33:17 PM »
Cook at antiwar attacks media silence on Assange:

"Assange faces 175 years in a US super-max prison on the basis of claims by Donald Trump’s administration that his exposure of US war crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan amounts to “espionage”."

"Publishing evidence of state crimes, as Assange’s WikiLeaks organisation has done, is covered by both free speech and public interest defences. Publishing evidence furnished by whistleblowers is at the heart of any journalism that aspires to hold power to account and in check. "

"ultimately the Obama administration abandoned the idea of issuing an indictment against Assange. There was simply no way to charge him without also putting journalists at the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Guardian on trial too."

"one might have imagined that the entire media – from rightwing to liberal-left outlets – would be up in arms about Assange’s current predicament ... They have remained all but silent ... the media have taken no more than a cursory interest in the events of the extradition hearing itself"

"Most troubling of all, the media have not reported the fact that during the hearing lawyers for the US have abandoned the implausible premise of their main argument that Assange’s work did not constitute journalism. Now they appear to accept that Assange did indeed do journalism, and that other journalists could suffer his fate. What was once implicit has become explicit, as Assange warned"

"It is in reality a media elite, a corporate media, owned by and answerable to billionaire owners – or in the case of the BBC, ultimately to the state – whose interests it really serves."

"the primary role of the corporate media – aside from its roles in selling us advertising and keeping us pacified through entertainment and consumerism – is to serve as an arena in which rival centres of power within the establishment fight for their narrow interests, settling scores with each other, reinforcing narratives that benefit them, and spreading disinformation against their competitors."

"From the outset, the work of Assange and WikiLeaks threatened to disrupt the cosy relationship between the media elite and the political elite. "

" worse than the potential rupture between the media elite and the political elite, the WikiLeaks model implied an imminent redundancy for the corporate media. In publishing WikiLeaks’ revelations, the corporate media feared it was being reduced to the role of a platform – one that could be discarded later – for the publication of truths sourced elsewhere."

"The undeclared role of the corporate media, dependent on corporate owners and corporate advertising, is to serve as gatekeeper, deciding which truths should be revealed in the “public interest” "

"The corporate media’s other possible response was to get behind the political elite’s efforts to destroy WikiLeaks. Once WikiLeaks and Assange were disabled, there could be a return to media business as usual. Outlets would once again chase tidbits of information from the corridors of power, getting “exclusives” from the power centres they were allied with."

"What is in the newspaper is not a reflection of the values of the people in that institution, it is a reflection of the market demand."

"That market demand, in turn, is shaped not by moral values but by economic forces – forces that need a media elite, just as they do a political elite, to shore up an ideological worldview that keeps those elites in power."

"the institutions of the Guardian and the New York Times will shed no more tears than Donald Trump and Joe Biden if Assange ends up spending the rest of his life behind bars."

https://original.antiwar.com/cook/2020/09/23/the-guardian-is-silent-about-the-us-using-the-paper-to-jail-assange/

sidd


vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4357
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2471
  • Likes Given: 334
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1174 on: September 25, 2020, 01:36:43 AM »
Trump cuts aid for pro-democracy groups in Belarus, Hong Kong and Iran
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/sep/24/trump-open-technology-fund-hong-kong-belarus-iran

Open Technology Fund, which helped activists evade state surveillance and sidestep web censorship, sees $20m grant pulled

The Trump administration has stopped vital technical assistance to pro-democracy groups in Belarus, Hong Kong and Iran, which had helped activists evade state surveillance and sidestep internet censorship.

The Open Technology Fund (OTF) has had to stop all its operations in Belarus, and many of its activities supporting civil society in Hong Kong and Iran, because a congressionally-mandated grant of nearly $20m has been withheld by a new Trump appointee, Michael Pack.

The OTF is a small non-profit organisation which develops technologies for evading cyber-surveillance and for circumventing internet and radio blackouts imposed by authoritarian regimes. It provides daily help to pro-democracy movements in installing and maintaining them, with the aim of staying at least one step ahead of the state.

The chair of the OTF board, Karen Kornbluh, said the end of funding from the US Agency for Global Media (USAGM), which Pack has been running since June, would mean that activists living under repressive regimes were at increased risk

... “We have these agencies and we’re kneecapping them,” said Kornbluh, a former US ambassador and now director of the digital innovation and democracy initiative at the German Marshall Fund of the United States.

... Pack had agreed over a month ago to appear before the House foreign affairs committee on Thursday, but canceled with a few days notice and then ignored a committee subpoena to attend.

Since taking over USAGM in June, Pack – an ally of rightwing ideologue and former Trump adviser, Stephen Bannon – purged all the top management and boards of the broadcasters under its control, froze spending, and elevated the profile of pro-administration comment in relation to news.

Kornbluh and former USAGM officials testifying before the foreign affairs committee described a climate of chaos and creeping authoritarianism at the agency that was sapping the credibility of VOA, RFE/RL and other US broadcasters, with consequences for US national security.

They also said Pack was endangering journalists by refusing to renew the visas for foreign journalists working for VOA, leading to their deportation, potentially to countries where they could be at risk.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Hefaistos

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 724
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 76
  • Likes Given: 515
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1175 on: September 25, 2020, 06:56:26 AM »
You can follow the trial of Assange at Craig Murray's blog.
He has EXTENSIVE coverage, as he reports directly from the proceedings.

https://www.craigmurray.org.uk/

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4357
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2471
  • Likes Given: 334
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1176 on: September 26, 2020, 11:12:09 PM »
Judge Rules Tucker Carlson Is Not a Credible Source of News
https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2020/09/judge-rules-fox-news-tucker-carlson-not-source-of-news-defamation-suit-mcdougal-trump.html

... Do Fox News viewers think Tucker Carlson tells them the truth? Are they, in fact, reasonable? The federal judge, Mary Kay Vyskocil, who herself was appointed to the federal bench by Trump nine months ago, dismissed the case, citing Carlson’s First Amendment protections. That is, Vyskocil bought the argument Fox News was pushing that Carlson is, first and foremost, not a provider of “the news” as we know it, or “facts” as we commonly understand them, and his audience knows this. They’re apparently in on the gag.

Fox News doesn’t label Carlson’s speech parody because that’s embarrassing for a company with the word news in its name to admit; it’s not factual journalism because that implies some responsibility for the credibility of the information that you spew. Instead, Fox News lawyers claim, Carlson is not “stating actual facts” but simply engaging in “non-literal commentary.” I couldn’t have described Carlson or Fox News better myself.

From Vyskocil’s opinion:

...In the context of “Tucker Carlson Tonight,” the Court finds that Mr. Carlson’s invocation of “extortion” against Ms. McDougal is nonactionable hyperbole, intended to frame the debate in the guest commentator segment that followed Mr. Carlson’s soliloquy. As Defendant notes, Mr. Carlson himself aims to “challenge political correctness and media bias.” This “general tenor” of the show should then inform a viewer that he is not “stating actual facts” about the topics he discusses and is instead engaging in “exaggeration” and “non-literal commentary.” … Given Mr. Carlson’s reputation, any reasonable viewer ‘arrives with an appropriate amount of skepticism’ …

In other words, “any reasonable viewer” doesn’t actually believe what Tucker Carlson is saying to be true. It is therefore unreasonable to take what Tucker Carlson says as truth. Good note, judge.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4357
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2471
  • Likes Given: 334
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1177 on: September 29, 2020, 05:30:24 PM »
Fox News Uses 'Hate' Five Times More Often than Competitors, Study Finds
https://www.theguardian.com/media/2020/sep/29/fox-news-uses-hate-five-times-more-often-than-competitors-study-finds
https://theconversation.com/fox-news-uses-the-word-hate-much-more-than-msnbc-or-cnn-145983

Study finds Fox’s usage of the word has increased over time, with a notable spike around the time that Trump’s presidency began

https://cdn.theconversation.com/static_files/files/1255/Hate_on_Fox_News_draft_report_9-28-20.pdf

“Fox usually pairs certain words alongside ‘hate’. The most notable was ‘they’ – as in, ‘they hate’. Fox used this phrase 101 times between January and May. MSNBC used it just five times.”

... “We found Fox’s usage of ‘they hate’ has increased over time,” they wrote, “with a clear spike around the polarising 2016 Trump-Clinton election. But Fox’s use of ‘hate’ really took off when Trump’s presidency began. Beginning in January 2017, the mean usage of ‘they hate’ on the network doubled.”

The study found that when Fox News says “they hate”, it most often means “Democrats, liberals, political elites and the media”.

“As for the object of all this hatred, Sean Hannity, Tucker Carlson and other Fox hosts most often name Trump. Anchors also identify their audience – ‘you’, ‘Christians’ and ‘us’ – as the target of animosity … these language patterns construct a coherent but potentially dangerous narrative about the world.”

https://www.theatlantic.com/culture/archive/2020/09/fox-news-trump-language-stelter-hoax/616309/

In one famous example this summer, Carlson called Tammy Duckworth, a Democratic senator from Illinois who lost her legs when her helicopter was shot down in Iraq, “a deeply silly and unimpressive person” and “a coward” who “hates the country”.

The study did not only consider uses of “hate” by Fox News hosts, citing remarks by House minority leader Kevin McCarthy to Hannity on 13 February: “Democrats … don’t just hate the president, they hate you, they hate me, they hate the viewers. They hate everything about us.”

The authors pointed to Pew Research findings which say Republicans are likely to see Democrats as immoral or unpatriotic, and to trust Fox News more than other outlets.

The professors said such division “bodes badly for its handling of what seems likely to be a chaotic, divisive presidential election. In pitting its viewers against the rest of the country, Fox News works against potential solutions to the the very crises it covers.”
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1178 on: October 05, 2020, 07:42:53 AM »
History of evolution of the media in the USA over the last 30 years by taibbi:



worth watching.

sidd

Tom_Mazanec

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 3906
  • Earth will survive AGW...but will Homo sapiens?
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 640
  • Likes Given: 377
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1179 on: October 14, 2020, 11:46:28 PM »
Climate change is responsible for half of the Great Barrier Reef being lost, study warns
https://www.foxnews.com/science/climate-change-is-responsible-for-half-of-the-great-barrier-reef-being-lost-study-warns
Quote
The research shows that the Great Barrier Reef's size is no longer able to protect it from the ravages of warmer ocean temperatures, the experts said.

"We used to think the Great Barrier Reef is protected by its sheer size – but our results show that even the world's largest and relatively well-protected reef system is increasingly compromised and in decline," Hughes said.

The article finishes up with
Quote
Skeptics have largely dismissed fears over man’s impact on global warming, saying climate change has been going on since the beginning of time. They also claim the dangers of a warming planet are being wildly exaggerated and question the impact that fossil fuels have had on climate change.
but the rest of the article could have been printed in the Guardian. Is this normal for Fox News?
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Sebastian Jones

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 426
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 107
  • Likes Given: 98
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1180 on: October 15, 2020, 06:22:49 AM »
Climate change is responsible for half of the Great Barrier Reef being lost, study warns
https://www.foxnews.com/science/climate-change-is-responsible-for-half-of-the-great-barrier-reef-being-lost-study-warns
(SNIP)
...... the rest of the article could have been printed in the Guardian. Is this normal for Fox News?


Hmmm. Not abnormal. Fox is divided between Opinion, which tends to be seriously right wing and often unhinged, and hard news, staffed by people that take journalism seriously.

Tom_Mazanec

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 3906
  • Earth will survive AGW...but will Homo sapiens?
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 640
  • Likes Given: 377
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1181 on: October 15, 2020, 05:37:53 PM »
Former Republican congressman says Murdoch's media outlets fuelling 'climate rejectionism'
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/oct/14/former-republican-congressman-says-murdochs-media-outlets-fuelling-climate-rejectionism
Quote
Bob Inglis tells Australian thinktank that Fox News and Wall Street Journal are holding back progress on climate
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1182 on: October 15, 2020, 09:17:58 PM »
Facebook, Twitter suppress Hunter Biden expose at nypost:

Suppressed stories at:
https://nypost.com/2020/10/14/email-reveals-how-hunter-biden-introduced-ukrainian-biz-man-to-dad/
https://nypost.com/2020/10/15/emails-reveal-how-hunter-biden-tried-to-cash-in-big-with-chinese-firm/

"In an unprecedented step against a major news publication, Twitter blocked users from posting links to the Post story or photos from the unconfirmed report"

"Facebook, meanwhile, placed restrictions on linking to the article"

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/oct/14/facebook-twitter-new-york-post-hunter-biden

"Twitter locked the personal account of White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Wednesday after she shared a New York Post story"

https://www.dailywire.com/news/twitter-locks-out-wh-press-secretary-for-sharing-ny-post-story

" Trump’s reelection campaign complained Thursday that Twitter had briefly locked its account"

"three hours after Hahn’s initial tweet, the Trump campaign posted a message saying that access to its account had been reinstated"

https://www.politico.com/news/2020/10/15/trump-campaign-twitter-suspended-429579

sidd

« Last Edit: October 15, 2020, 09:42:43 PM by sidd »

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0

ritter

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 550
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 8
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1184 on: October 30, 2020, 04:28:46 PM »
Greenwald resigns from the intercept over Biden story suppression:

https://greenwald.substack.com/p/my-resignation-from-the-intercept
https://greenwald.substack.com/p/article-on-joe-and-hunter-biden-censored
https://greenwald.substack.com/p/emails-with-intercept-editors-showing

sidd

I think there's more to the "Hunter Laptop" story than we're being told. Yet.

The timing smells of a political hit for the election, but the information leaking out of the laptop is pretty damning for the Biden family. Too bad no credible journalists are covering it. It would suck to elect Biden only to discover he's as crooked as Trump.

Oh well, my vote for Biden went in a couple of weeks ago.

Florifulgurator

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 378
  • Virtual world alter ego / अवतार of Martin Gisser
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 173
  • Likes Given: 121
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1185 on: October 30, 2020, 05:37:47 PM »
Good riddance!
Greenwald has jumped the shark often enough.

Krugman 2016:
Quote
In other words, focus on the facts. America and the world can’t afford another election tipped by innuendo.
https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/05/opinion/hillary-clinton-gets-gored.html
Google image search on my avatar image gives "wood". In fact it is the lower part of David Hilbert's tombstone.

The Walrus

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 780
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 106
  • Likes Given: 62
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1186 on: October 30, 2020, 07:33:38 PM »
Sounds like someone is trying really hard to ensure a Biden victory.  I wonder what will happen afterward, when the truth gets out.

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1187 on: October 31, 2020, 04:09:59 AM »

Florifulgurator

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 378
  • Virtual world alter ego / अवतार of Martin Gisser
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 173
  • Likes Given: 121
Google image search on my avatar image gives "wood". In fact it is the lower part of David Hilbert's tombstone.

The Walrus

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 780
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 106
  • Likes Given: 62
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1189 on: November 01, 2020, 04:07:05 PM »
It doesn’t get any better than this:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.freep.com/amp/6102179002

pikaia

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 334
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 69
  • Likes Given: 38
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1190 on: November 03, 2020, 11:55:30 AM »
Why is Trump so popular? I think Sam Harris may have hit the nail on the head with his theory.

https://samharris.org/podcasts/224-key-trumps-appeal/

Tom_Mazanec

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 3906
  • Earth will survive AGW...but will Homo sapiens?
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 640
  • Likes Given: 377
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1191 on: November 03, 2020, 12:39:39 PM »
pikaia, the podcast may be correct for some Trump voters, but not for all, and probably not for a majority.
If this was why I voted for Trump in the 2016 election, then why did I vote for Kasich in the 2016 Primary?
What percentage of the votes did Trump get in the early primaries?
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

Florifulgurator

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 378
  • Virtual world alter ego / अवतार of Martin Gisser
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 173
  • Likes Given: 121
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1192 on: November 03, 2020, 03:55:56 PM »
Why is Trump so popular? I think Sam Harris may have hit the nail on the head with his theory.

https://samharris.org/podcasts/224-key-trumps-appeal/
Reminds of the theory why GWB got elected and not Al Gore: Joe Sixpack from Flyover Country could identify more with the stupid GWB. -- But who would want to have a beer with Trump?
Google image search on my avatar image gives "wood". In fact it is the lower part of David Hilbert's tombstone.

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5718
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 796
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1193 on: November 03, 2020, 09:51:16 PM »
Spellberg at cabinet on the death of  dream sharing protocols in the west

"many of the world’s cultures—especially outside of the modern West—have developed elaborate protocols by which dreams can be shared. "

"what happens to a culture, like our own, that doesn’t practice dream sharing ... ?"

" dream sharing is a protocol for regular renegotiation of what might be termed the social contract of sensuous imagining, the set of images and emotions and unseen realities that govern, even more than abstract ideas, 
an individual’s relationship to society and to 
the cosmos."

"In the Palestinian Talmud, for instance, it’s made quite clear that when it comes to prophetic dreams, what causes the fulfillment of a prophecy is not the dream itself (or its originator, God), but rather the interpretation of the dream. If a rabbi interprets a dream as foretelling the death of the dreamer and then the dreamer dies, then it’s the rabbi’s fault that he’s died"

"Cicero writes that the dream-obsessed people of Telmessos blamed the interpreters, and not the dreamer, if a dream prediction turned out to be false; it wasn’t the dream itself that was wrong—such a phrase would have made no sense to the dreamers of Telmessos—it was the interpretation that had failed."

"there are many cultures where recounting and interpreting is not the paradigm for dream sharing at all. Instead, dreams are understood to be sites of action; not texts but places, not a coded language but a part of reality. "

"It may be that a key task—hunting, for example—is accomplished in dreams before it can be accomplished in waking life. Or it may be, as among the Wayuu of Colombia and Venezuela, that the trajectory of a dream is altered by being retold in waking life, with the expectation that the next night, the dream itself will change, and, as a result, the person’s waking life will too."

"the generalizations of anthropologists inevitably fail to capture the reality of a community in which myths and songs and ideas are created, negotiated, and modified by individuals, each with a distinctive cast of mind, some of them especially prodigious and brilliant dreamers."

"In many Australian cultures, dreams provide an essential point of connection. Conception occurs when a soul crosses over from one realm to the other in dreams; death doesn’t truly occur until a person is sighted one last time in a dream; dreams produce insights about where to hunt, or they answer a question about lineage; sometimes they give birth to new songs and new rituals; they often provide a stage on which dreamers can glimpse the eternal and world-creating movements of their individual ancestors, whose inner essence their own bodies contain."

" the events of dreams and the events of waking life are required to be somehow in accord. "

"Dream life and waking life do not exist in a hermeneutic relation to one another—instead, they are interpenetrable and complementary planes of existence. Acting in one has an effect in the other—which in turn has an effect again in the first, and on and on in a continuous cycle.
"

" In order to cross trails with an animal in the bush, the hunter had first to make contact with the sun’s path across the sky.”[10] Animals had to be taken (or give themselves up) in dreams before they could be killed in waking life; indeed, the real hunt took place in dreams, and the waking hunt was only its fulfillment or realization. The details constituting this system of dream-knowing were in every instance intimately tied to the practical skills required to survive on the ecological knife-edge that is the boreal forest. "

"A nomadic culture cannot afford to express itself in huge numbers of material artifacts. But a system of dreams and visions, a network of images, a world-picture mapping and ordering the perceivable world, imparted through language, retained in the imagination—this can be carried easily, with no added burden to the back (though presumably the weight on mind and memory is prodigious and requires great training to bear). For a nomadic community, a cosmology and its dream manifestations are as a portable Chartres, a weightless Louvre, a repository of knowledge, history, and advice, of injunctions to change your life or keep it as it is, all expressed in sensuous, globalizing form. This vast place is entered every night and taken along every morning in the mind, and it is both an image of possibility and a theater of action."

"Dreams are instances where the imagination unfurls its full power over us, its capacity to situate us within an entire cosmos. Dreams show how the imagination mediates between perception and action, how it takes our experience of reality and directly transmutes it into a set of possible feelings, desires, and behaviors. And dreams are instances in which these powers of the imagination can be later contemplated, while waking, at a distance. To discuss dreams, tweak them, act them out, try to alter them and manipulate them in waking life—this is an attempt to achieve distance from the imagination’s world-picture so as to study and refine it.
"

"before going to bed, the Ongees narrated to one another their dreams from the night before, and their experiences of the day that had just ended, especially their time spent in the forest hunting and gathering food. But in doing so, they would negotiate the content of their dreams, modifying it so that everyone’s dream accounts might be gradually aligned with one another ... The indigenous explanation for this extraordinary process, Pandya reports, is as follows. During dreaming, the inner self leaves the outer self (the body) and travels the island in order to recuperate the bits of being that a person has lost during the day. These bits of being are most commonly manifest as stray smells, marooned on bushes and trees by the body during its daytime passage around the island. As the inner self collects these smells in the dream, it retraces the path of the body, collecting and consolidating important memories and making observations. The harvest of this inner being is then woven, over the sleeping “body external,” into a spider web that holds in place all the smells, dreams, and memories of previous nights and days, and so allows them to be used in the coming day. When the entire community talks through their dreams before sleeping, then the individual webs are woven together into a single web over the whole community. "

"The Ongees have produced a protocol by which dreams can come to be shared. It permits the negotiation and analysis of the unseen world, its transmission into the public sphere. In doing so, it allows a negotiation of what the society holds in common: not, again, its ideas or customs, per se, but rather the images, scenarios, and pathways by which the days and hours might be divided up and made meaningful. Here is a dream-world that seems to bypass the philosophers’ anxieties. How can they be certain that what they describe and hear is really what they dreamt? the philosophers might ask. To this the Ongees respond by flouting the distinction between representation and reality so flagrantly it seems, at least to this distant outsider, that they do so with self-awareness. The dream exists not as some sealed-off thing that language tries and fails to reach; on the contrary, the transformations that language and discourse effect upon the dream come to be a part of its essence. This helps explain why this dream reporting has to take place in the evening, and not in the mornings. The process is intended for future dreams and future waking: to harmonize previous experiences is not to rewrite history; it’s to build a more coherent future. For one can imagine that a process like this carried out over generations would in fact make the participants’ dreams ever more aligned with one another.
"

"This dream-sharing process, according to Pandya, is now in the past. It declined when the Indian government began moving Ongees onto a coconut plantation, preventing them from sleeping in circles and instead setting their daily schedules to an industrial rhythm of work and sleep ... To do good forest work like hunt, we need to discuss dreams of the forest. We do not dream forests anymore! We are forgetting to work in the forest because we are reminded to get up and work in the plantation! We now dream only of the coconut plantation. We do not have any tonki ti megegatebeh [a session of dream discussions and singing] just a few small “meeting-ey.” "

"the dream-work makes the waking work possible. The dream-world sets the template for behavior in the waking world, defines the parameters within which humans can act. But this does not involve a loss of agency in the waking world. It does not involve a surrender of waking life to the vagaries of the dream, precisely because that dream-world is being self-consciously and deliberately negotiated.
"

"The quarantining of dreams within metaphysics is in fact peculiar to Nietzsche’s milieu, to the worldview of Western philosophy in the phase when it began to call itself modern. Nietzsche understood that for human beings, the perceptual world is not enough; we need another world alongside it to explore the full range of our possible actions and reactions."

"To have abandoned dream sharing, or to restrict it only to the most private settings, as in the therapist’s office, or to think that sharing imaginary perceptions is solely the province of fiction, or the purview of half-mad poets—these are not the signs of a culture that has overthrown the tyranny of the superstitious imagination. They are rather markers of a society that has sunk into stupefaction before the immense power of its own world-dream, by which I mean that human picture of reality that is inextricable from the parameters of human action. These are the signs of a society unable to change or guide that dream with any precision or accuracy"

Read the whole thing:

http://www.cabinetmagazine.org/issues/67/spellberg1.php

sidd



vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 4357
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2471
  • Likes Given: 334
Re: The Media: Examples of Good AND Bad Journalism
« Reply #1194 on: November 10, 2020, 01:47:51 PM »
Goebbels would be proud ...

Analysis of Trump's Tweets Reveals Systematic Diversion of the Media
https://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2020/november/trump-twitter.html
https://phys.org/news/2020-11-analysis-trump-tweets-reveals-systematic.html

President Donald Trump's controversial use of social media is widely known and theories abound about its ulterior motives. New research published today in Nature Communications claims to provide the first evidence-based analysis demonstrating the US President's Twitter account has been routinely deployed to divert attention away from a topic potentially harmful to his reputation, in turn suppressing negative related media coverage.

The international study, led by the University of Bristol in the UK, tested two hypotheses: whether an increase in harmful media coverage was followed by increased diversionary Twitter activity, and if such diversion successfully reduced subsequent media coverage of the harmful topic.

... "Our analysis presents empirical evidence consistent with the theory that whenever the media report something threatening or politically uncomfortable for President Trump, his account increasingly tweets about unrelated topics representing his political strengths. This systematic diversion of attention away from a topic potentially damaging to him was shown to significantly reduce negative media coverage the next day."

The study focused on Trump's first two years in office, scrutinising the Robert Mueller investigation into potential collusion with Russia in the 2016 Presidential Election, as this was politically harmful to the President. The team analysed content relating to Russia and the Mueller investigation in two of the country's most politically neutral media outlets, New York Times (NYT) and ABC World News Tonight (ABC). The team also selected a set of keywords judged to play to Trump's preferred topics at the time, which were hypothesized to be likely to appear in diversionary tweets. The keywords related to "jobs", "China", and "immigration"; topics representing the president's supposed political strengths.

... In support of their hypotheses, the team found that every five additional ABC headlines relating to the Mueller investigation was associated with one more mention of a keyword in Trump's tweets. In turn, two additional mentions of one of the keywords in a Trump tweet was associated with roughly one less mention of the Mueller investigation in the following day's NYT.

Such a pattern did not emerge with placebo topics that presented no threat to the President, for instance Brexit or other non-political issues such as football or gardening.

The research also conducted an expanded analysis considering the President's entire Twitter vocabulary as a potential source of diversion, which confirmed the generality of the researchers' conclusions. Specifically, the analysis identified nearly 90 pairs of words that were more likely to appear in tweets when Russia-Mueller coverage increased, and that suppressed media coverage the next day. Those word pairs largely represented the President's political strengths, focusing again in particular on the economy.

... we hope these results serve as a helpful reminder to the media that they have the power to set the news agenda, focusing on the topics they deem most important, while perhaps not paying so much attention to the Twitter-sphere."

Stephan Lewandowsky, Michael Jetter, Ullrich Ecker, Using the president's tweets to understand political diversion in the age of social media, Nature Communications, 2020.
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-19644-6
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late