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magnamentis

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1700 on: October 13, 2015, 01:43:13 PM »
just want to thank you once in a while for those graphs, they make it very easy to get the bigger picture on one glance, very useful indeed  8)

Espen

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1701 on: October 14, 2015, 05:55:41 AM »
OJIS:

 6,234,911 km2(October 13, 2015)up 107,421 km2 from previous.
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1702 on: October 15, 2015, 05:58:41 AM »
IJIS:

6,410,743 km2(October 14, 2015)up 175,832 km2 from previous.
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1703 on: October 16, 2015, 06:50:07 PM »
IJIS:

6,588,058 km2(October 15, 2015)up 147,315 km2 from previous.
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1704 on: October 17, 2015, 11:08:03 AM »
IJIS:

6,800,955 km2(October 16, 2015)up 212,897 km2 from previous.
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Quantum

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1705 on: October 17, 2015, 08:57:27 PM »
The massive rise shouldn't be surprising given that the coastal Russian ice is starting to join with the main pack, expect some more huge rises over the next few days, we should get a 2nd period with large rises when something similar happens in the Beaufort (if they happen together we could see 300k+), and from then the rate of increases should drop significantly.

ra3000

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1706 on: October 17, 2015, 09:29:10 PM »
Well, but after Beaufort it comes Hudson, Greenland, Kara and Chukchi and Hudson refreezes fast so.. Just good for thought but the thing is that refreezing is going at aa rather well pace for now. By the way, I want to thank to Espen for his graphs. I follow it daily.

Espen

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1707 on: October 18, 2015, 09:15:05 AM »
IJIS

 7,043,581 km2(October 17, 2015)up 242,626 km2 from previous.
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jdallen

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1708 on: October 18, 2015, 09:40:31 PM »
IJIS

 7,043,581 km2(October 17, 2015)up 242,626 km2 from previous.
Wow!

Let me add, how is this happening with so much heat being imported into the arctic from lower latitudes, as is implied by what I've been seeing via Climate Reanalyzer?
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jdallen

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1709 on: October 18, 2015, 09:47:14 PM »
To my previous point, to be clear, I believe IJIS is reporting accurately.  I'm just astonished, and trying to understand the mechanics in play.  We've had years which had this much open water and didn't re-freeze with anything resembling the speed we are seeing.  Further, we haven't seen (IIRC) anti-cyclonic activity that would lend itself to dumping of significant amounts of heat out of the atmosphere.  If anything, there's more heat being imported, both as sensible heat and indirectly via imports of moisture from the remnants of cyclones.

To my point:
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seaicesailor

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1710 on: October 19, 2015, 12:35:38 AM »
To my previous point, to be clear, I believe IJIS is reporting accurately.  I'm just astonished, and trying to understand the mechanics in play.  We've had years which had this much open water and didn't re-freeze with anything resembling the speed we are seeing.  Further, we haven't seen (IIRC) anti-cyclonic activity that would lend itself to dumping of significant amounts of heat out of the atmosphere.  If anything, there's more heat being imported, both as sensible heat and indirectly via imports of moisture from the remnants of cyclones.

To my point:

The reds we see I think, just result of this massive fast refreezing anchoring temps much higher than it used to. The imported heat seems to be of lesser amount imo.

As to why so fast, I can only echo the speculation that ice debris kept ocean surface cool enough and acts as aggregate for new ice formation

Espen

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1711 on: October 19, 2015, 05:23:46 AM »
IJIS:

7,215,555 km2(October 18, 2015)up 171,974 km2 from previous.
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Zant

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1712 on: October 19, 2015, 05:51:40 AM »
Did I miss something?  Most of the years disappeared from the last 2 graphs , and 2015 is now third lowest?

jdallen

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1713 on: October 19, 2015, 06:10:30 AM »
To my previous point, to be clear, I believe IJIS is reporting accurately.  I'm just astonished, and trying to understand the mechanics in play.  We've had years which had this much open water and didn't re-freeze with anything resembling the speed we are seeing.  Further, we haven't seen (IIRC) anti-cyclonic activity that would lend itself to dumping of significant amounts of heat out of the atmosphere.  If anything, there's more heat being imported, both as sensible heat and indirectly via imports of moisture from the remnants of cyclones.

To my point:

The reds we see I think, just result of this massive fast refreezing anchoring temps much higher than it used to. The imported heat seems to be of lesser amount imo.

As to why so fast, I can only echo the speculation that ice debris kept ocean surface cool enough and acts as aggregate for new ice formation
We are 1.5 Million KM2 higher extent than we were at the same time in 2007, after having flirted (within 150,000KM2) with that year's low.

That's pretty astonishing, and my sensibility is pressed hard to believe there was "slush" ice distributed across that wide a region just waiting for temperatures to drop and form foci for re-crystallization.  It just seems too simple.  It requires too perfect a set of starting conditions. 

That's my sense of it at least.  I'm looking for other mechanics to explain what we're seeing.  I can't rule out your hypothesis, but I think its far from proven.
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DavidR

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1714 on: October 19, 2015, 08:28:58 AM »
To my previous point, to be clear, I believe IJIS is reporting accurately.  I'm just astonished, and trying to understand the mechanics in play.  We've had years which had this much open water and didn't re-freeze with anything resembling the speed we are seeing.  Further, we haven't seen (IIRC) anti-cyclonic activity that would lend itself to dumping of significant amounts of heat out of the atmosphere.  If anything, there's more heat being imported, both as sensible heat and indirectly via imports of moisture from the remnants of cyclones.

To my point:

The reds we see I think, just result of this massive fast refreezing anchoring temps much higher than it used to. The imported heat seems to be of lesser amount imo.

As to why so fast, I can only echo the speculation that ice debris kept ocean surface cool enough and acts as aggregate for new ice formation
We are 1.5 Million KM2 higher extent than we were at the same time in 2007, after having flirted (within 150,000KM2) with that year's low.

That's pretty astonishing, and my sensibility is pressed hard to believe there was "slush" ice distributed across that wide a region just waiting for temperatures to drop and form foci for re-crystallization.  It just seems too simple.  It requires too perfect a set of starting conditions. 

That's my sense of it at least.  I'm looking for other mechanics to explain what we're seeing.  I can't rule out your hypothesis, but I think its far from proven.

This may just be a variation in the weather. According to NSIDC extent, 2007  had no days with  increases above 150K before the 18th Oct but still had 12 for the month, 2012 had 13 for the month with 7 having occurred before 18th  just like this year.

The increase in 2012 from 12 - 17 Oct was more than 200K Km^2 greater than this year.  I  expect a lot  of short term variations in rates of change to  be nothing more than the variations expected as highs and lows more around the area.
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jdallen

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1715 on: October 19, 2015, 06:55:53 PM »
To my previous point, to be clear, I believe IJIS is reporting accurately.  I'm just astonished, and trying to understand the mechanics in play.  We've had years which had this much open water and didn't re-freeze with anything resembling the speed we are seeing.  Further, we haven't seen (IIRC) anti-cyclonic activity that would lend itself to dumping of significant amounts of heat out of the atmosphere.  If anything, there's more heat being imported, both as sensible heat and indirectly via imports of moisture from the remnants of cyclones.

To my point:

The reds we see I think, just result of this massive fast refreezing anchoring temps much higher than it used to. The imported heat seems to be of lesser amount imo.

As to why so fast, I can only echo the speculation that ice debris kept ocean surface cool enough and acts as aggregate for new ice formation
We are 1.5 Million KM2 higher extent than we were at the same time in 2007, after having flirted (within 150,000KM2) with that year's low.

That's pretty astonishing, and my sensibility is pressed hard to believe there was "slush" ice distributed across that wide a region just waiting for temperatures to drop and form foci for re-crystallization.  It just seems too simple.  It requires too perfect a set of starting conditions. 

That's my sense of it at least.  I'm looking for other mechanics to explain what we're seeing.  I can't rule out your hypothesis, but I think its far from proven.

This may just be a variation in the weather. According to NSIDC extent, 2007  had no days with  increases above 150K before the 18th Oct but still had 12 for the month, 2012 had 13 for the month with 7 having occurred before 18th  just like this year.

The increase in 2012 from 12 - 17 Oct was more than 200K Km^2 greater than this year.  I  expect a lot  of short term variations in rates of change to  be nothing more than the variations expected as highs and lows more around the area.
I'd be inclined to agree except for the fact temperatures are so high. The DMI graph shows north of 80 almost 10C warmer than normal.

The apparent similarity to 2012 is interesting, but 2012 started the refreeze with a whole lot more open water, at higher latitude.  I think we need to be cautious about deriving a lot from that.
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ktonine

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1716 on: October 20, 2015, 02:43:07 AM »
jdallen: "I'd be inclined to agree except for the fact temperatures are so high. The DMI graph shows north of 80 almost 10C warmer than normal."

It can be deceiving to look at arctic temperature anomalies - especially this time of year. The temperature on DMI is still 10 degrees below freezing.  Since energy is released when ice is formed, the DMI temps are confounded by the amount of freezing taking place; i.e., the more water that changes phase to ice the more energy is released to the atmosphere (and ocean).  So the arctic ocean is providing sensible heat to the atmosphere and also the latent heat of fusion as it freezes.

kingbum

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1717 on: October 20, 2015, 04:42:33 AM »
jdallen: "I'd be inclined to agree except for the fact temperatures are so high. The DMI graph shows north of 80 almost 10C warmer than normal."

It can be deceiving to look at arctic temperature anomalies - especially this time of year. The temperature on DMI is still 10 degrees below freezing.  Since energy is released when ice is formed, the DMI temps are confounded by the amount of freezing taking place; i.e., the more water that changes phase to ice the more energy is released to the atmosphere (and ocean).  So the arctic ocean is providing sensible heat to the atmosphere and also the latent heat of fusion as it freezes.

I can live with that explanation for now anyway...Its a sensible thought anyway as I look at the rate of this refreeze it is insane...Below freezing is below freezing whether it's by 10 degrees or 40 degrees...Lots of heat remain present due to the rapid refreeze that's sensible...my question is does the excess heat escape when the refreeze slows? That's what I will be watching for

jdallen

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1718 on: October 20, 2015, 09:16:15 AM »
jdallen: "I'd be inclined to agree except for the fact temperatures are so high. The DMI graph shows north of 80 almost 10C warmer than normal."

It can be deceiving to look at arctic temperature anomalies - especially this time of year. The temperature on DMI is still 10 degrees below freezing.  Since energy is released when ice is formed, the DMI temps are confounded by the amount of freezing taking place; i.e., the more water that changes phase to ice the more energy is released to the atmosphere (and ocean).  So the arctic ocean is providing sensible heat to the atmosphere and also the latent heat of fusion as it freezes.
Understood, but my skepticism is not based soley on those temperature anomalies - there's a lot of other factors which feed into it
- water temperatures (Sidebar: there's an upwelling of North Atlantic Drift near Svalbard that has SST's all they way up to 10C - within 300KM of the ice edge - unique but in keeping with SSTs which are considerably warmer than in the past - in fact above the freezing point of salt water)
- moisture inputs into the arctic from storms
-  snowfall and cloud cover...   

... It's an assemblage of things which I would expect *normally* would be feedbacks which would retard the refreeze, but obviously are not.   2011 and 2007 didn't refreeze anything like this fast.  2012 did, but started almost 1.5 Million KM2 lower in extent, and had more open water north of 80.  We know there's an awful lot more heat in the water than pre-2007, probably pre-2012.

Something is letting the phase change take place, and the heat has to be going somewhere.  *Where* is it going?  *How* is it getting there?  I just don't see it yet.
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Sleepy

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1719 on: October 20, 2015, 12:17:50 PM »
I don't know, but wouldn't it go straight up during strong El Ninos?
Look at nsidc and -81 to -84.  -82 & -83 shows a steeper refreeze and more ice than -81, then it drops the following years. Even the sea ice around Antarctica shows a similar behaviour now, as then.

A Swedish scientist once answered me on a blog, that the temperature contrasts should get higher from roughly 2km and upwards in the atmosphere in a warmer world, above the Arctic.
A comparison between temperatures/altitudes might reveal if that is the case now?

And now we do have a very strong El Nino, if the pattern from the early eighties repeats itself, the next two years will be interesting.

JayW

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1720 on: October 20, 2015, 01:20:59 PM »
jdallen: "I'd be inclined to agree except for the fact temperatures are so high. The DMI graph shows north of 80 almost 10C warmer than normal."

It can be deceiving to look at arctic temperature anomalies - especially this time of year. The temperature on DMI is still 10 degrees below freezing.  Since energy is released when ice is formed, the DMI temps are confounded by the amount of freezing taking place; i.e., the more water that changes phase to ice the more energy is released to the atmosphere (and ocean).  So the arctic ocean is providing sensible heat to the atmosphere and also the latent heat of fusion as it freezes.
Understood, but my skepticism is not based soley on those temperature anomalies - there's a lot of other factors which feed into it
- water temperatures (Sidebar: there's an upwelling of North Atlantic Drift near Svalbard that has SST's all they way up to 10C - within 300KM of the ice edge - unique but in keeping with SSTs which are considerably warmer than in the past - in fact above the freezing point of salt water)
- moisture inputs into the arctic from storms
-  snowfall and cloud cover...   

... It's an assemblage of things which I would expect *normally* would be feedbacks which would retard the refreeze, but obviously are not.   2011 and 2007 didn't refreeze anything like this fast.  2012 did, but started almost 1.5 Million KM2 lower in extent, and had more open water north of 80.  We know there's an awful lot more heat in the water than pre-2007, probably pre-2012.

Something is letting the phase change take place, and the heat has to be going somewhere.  *Where* is it going?  *How* is it getting there?  I just don't see it yet.

This is just a thought, but when waiting for the lakes to freeze over, light winds or even better, no wind is often required to get the surface to "skin over".  I have no idea if it's been calmer than *normal* in the arctic wind wise, but thought that light winds could be a possible explanation for a quicker refreeze.
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Espen

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1721 on: October 20, 2015, 07:25:36 PM »
IJIS:

7,323,512 km2(October 19, 2015)up 107,975 km2 from previous.
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ktonine

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1722 on: October 20, 2015, 11:34:42 PM »
jd - "... It's an assemblage of things which I would expect *normally* would be feedbacks which would retard the refreeze, but obviously are not.   2011 and 2007 didn't refreeze anything like this fast.  "

I can't figure out any rhyme or reason to the autumn refreeze either - though I did notice that the two most recent years that looked somewhat similar to 2015 were 2009 and 2006 ..... hmmmm .... and what happened on PIOMAS following those two autumns :)

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1723 on: October 21, 2015, 02:59:54 AM »
jdallen: "I'd be inclined to agree except for the fact temperatures are so high. The DMI graph shows north of 80 almost 10C warmer than normal."

It can be deceiving to look at arctic temperature anomalies - especially this time of year. The temperature on DMI is still 10 degrees below freezing.  Since energy is released when ice is formed, the DMI temps are confounded by the amount of freezing taking place; i.e., the more water that changes phase to ice the more energy is released to the atmosphere (and ocean).  So the arctic ocean is providing sensible heat to the atmosphere and also the latent heat of fusion as it freezes.
Understood, but my skepticism is not based soley on those temperature anomalies - there's a lot of other factors which feed into it
- water temperatures (Sidebar: there's an upwelling of North Atlantic Drift near Svalbard that has SST's all they way up to 10C - within 300KM of the ice edge - unique but in keeping with SSTs which are considerably warmer than in the past - in fact above the freezing point of salt water)
- moisture inputs into the arctic from storms
-  snowfall and cloud cover...   

... It's an assemblage of things which I would expect *normally* would be feedbacks which would retard the refreeze, but obviously are not.   2011 and 2007 didn't refreeze anything like this fast.  2012 did, but started almost 1.5 Million KM2 lower in extent, and had more open water north of 80.  We know there's an awful lot more heat in the water than pre-2007, probably pre-2012.

Something is letting the phase change take place, and the heat has to be going somewhere.  *Where* is it going?  *How* is it getting there?  I just don't see it yet.

This is just a thought, but when waiting for the lakes to freeze over, light winds or even better, no wind is often required to get the surface to "skin over".  I have no idea if it's been calmer than *normal* in the arctic wind wise, but thought that light winds could be a possible explanation for a quicker refreeze.

Having watched the great lakes the past few years and even rainy lake in Minnesota which isn't a small lake in itself either Jay is right about those winds...The lack of storminess maybe allowing nucleation near the surface combined with ice debris just waiting to refreeze I don't doubt that's part of it....It is warmer than usual however and that is a consequence of this rapid refreeze I think. So maybe once all this ice debris left over from August reconnects the refreezing should slow I think unless it remains calm. The lack of wind has always been critical to freshwater freezing on lakes

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1724 on: October 21, 2015, 07:26:12 PM »
IJIS:

7,363,764 km2(October 20, 2015)up 40,252 km2 from previous.
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1725 on: October 21, 2015, 09:20:16 PM »
Looks like the fast refreeze is slowing and I have to wonder where the heat is going, perhaps it's being transferred to the depths of the Arctic Ocean maybe?
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1726 on: October 22, 2015, 05:56:33 AM »
IJIS:

7,405,712 km2(October 21, 2015)up 41,948 km2 from previous.
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1727 on: October 22, 2015, 09:49:19 AM »
Looks like the fast refreeze is slowing and I have to wonder where the heat is going, perhaps it's being transferred to the depths of the Arctic Ocean maybe?
Fast refreeze is slowing quite probably because it is running out of sea surface close to -1.8C.

Where is the heat going... yah, I did ask that.  Still not sure.  Heat would not be going *into* the Ocean at this stage of things in all probability.  At the very least, the balance of exchange would still be net positive to atmosphere and from there, out of the system entirely.  The heat released to produce the ice... I'm not sure, but I'm beginning to think (and agree with other commentators) that it is heating the atmosphere.   While the water is "warm" at depth, exchanged heat could still exit to the atmosphere quickly enough to permit pan ice to form.

The trick may well still be (as was the case in 2014), not so much that ice is forming, as much as it is ice thickening sufficiently to resist the return of melt conditions in 2016.

I suspect that in spite of overturning heat from depth (see: various discussions and articles about turbulent flows at mid depths) that we still have a significant reservoir of heat being retained from the melt season, and re-capping the interferes with it being vented.  I don't think that will retard ice growth and thickening in specific however.  That particular problem I think will tie back to how much heat and moisture is imported from lower latitudes.  Reflective of that will be snowfall depths on the ice itself, which is another hindrance to ice formation.

Enough musing on my part; most all of what I've mentioned at this point is pure speculation.
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1728 on: October 23, 2015, 06:27:24 AM »
IJIS:

 7,535,180 km2(October 22, 2015)up 112,468 km2 from previous.
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1729 on: October 24, 2015, 09:49:20 AM »
IJIS:

7,682,510 km2(October 23, 2015)up 147,330 km2 from previous.
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1730 on: October 25, 2015, 12:38:50 PM »
IJIS:

7,841,460 km2(October 24, 2015)up 158,950 km2 from previous.

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1731 on: October 26, 2015, 05:22:33 AM »
IJIS:

7,909,226 km2(October 25, 2015)up 67,766 km2 from previous.
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1732 on: October 27, 2015, 05:53:45 AM »
IJIS:

7,967,525 km2(October 26, 2015)up 58,299 km2 from previous.
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1733 on: October 28, 2015, 05:22:58 AM »
IJIS:

8,019,058 km2(October 27, 2015)up 51,533 km2 from previous.
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1734 on: October 29, 2015, 05:27:45 AM »
IJIS:

8,091,177 km2(October 28, 2015)up 72,119 km2 from previous.
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1735 on: October 30, 2015, 06:15:15 AM »
IJIS:

8,210,513 km2(October 29, 2015)up 119,336 km2 from previous.
Have a ice day!

Unmex Chingon

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1736 on: October 30, 2015, 04:08:54 PM »
Did I miss something?  Most of the years disappeared from the last 2 graphs , and 2015 is now third lowest?
  Thanks Espen for the daily updates!  But where did the other years go?

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1737 on: October 30, 2015, 05:39:20 PM »
Did I miss something?  Most of the years disappeared from the last 2 graphs , and 2015 is now third lowest?
  Thanks Espen for the daily updates!  But where did the other years go?

Here it is:
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1738 on: October 30, 2015, 08:02:02 PM »
Did I miss something?  Most of the years disappeared from the last 2 graphs , and 2015 is now third lowest?
  Thanks Espen for the daily updates!  But where did the other years go?

Here it is:

Those sneaky ninja years going into hiding.
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1739 on: October 31, 2015, 11:09:57 AM »
IJIS:

8,339,701 km2(October 30, 2015)
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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1740 on: November 01, 2015, 11:14:36 AM »
IJIS:

8,505,723 km2(October 31, 2015)up 166,022 km2 from previous.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2015, 08:58:14 PM by Espen »
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Espen

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1741 on: November 02, 2015, 05:22:34 AM »
IJIS:

8,598,518 km2(November 1, 2015)up 92,795 km2 from previous.
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Espen

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1742 on: November 03, 2015, 05:50:25 AM »
IJIS:

8,634,401 km2(November 2, 2015)up 35,883 km2 from previous.
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Espen

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1743 on: November 04, 2015, 05:42:04 AM »
IJIS:

8,675,338 km2(November 3, 2015)up 40,937 km2 from previous.
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jdallen

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1744 on: November 04, 2015, 07:54:43 AM »
IJIS:

8,675,338 km2(November 3, 2015)up 40,937 km2 from previous.

 :o :o :o :o :o

The trend is now making a power dive at the 2007/2012 numbers.  This is just crazy.

(EDIT: BFTV's post for reference; the last few days have been 20-50K/day below the long term trend, and over 100K/day below 2011/2012.)

http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1112.msg65563.html#msg65563
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Peter Ellis

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1745 on: November 04, 2015, 10:12:55 AM »
A "power dive" from 2-3 days of below-average refreeze?  Take a step back and stop looking at stuff on less than a 5-day timescale.  Day to day wiggles are just noise.  Refreeze has been running almost exactly parallel to the 2000s average since the 18th of October.

magnamentis

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1746 on: November 04, 2015, 10:17:28 AM »
I understand your exitment, i as well was expecting that but to be honest quite a bit earlier. however i think the 2012 line is a bit overopti(pessi)mistic. let's look on the 2007 line first, while they usually get closer later on anyways.

magnamentis

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1747 on: November 04, 2015, 10:21:04 AM »
I understand your exitment, i as well was expecting that but to be honest quite a bit earlier. however i think the 2012 line is a bit overopti(pessi)mistic. let's look on the 2007 line first, while they usually get closer later on anyways.

no matter whether it's now or soon, this dive of the line will happen, the energy is in the surrounding ocean and sooner or later will take it's toll on the refreezing up-curve and it's not just a 2-3 days thingy, looking at the ocean temps of the remaining open waters makes it most probable that they will not drop by the necessary amount to freeze during the next few days or even weeks, hence the gap will close and it makes totally sense IMO

ra3000

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1748 on: November 04, 2015, 12:28:11 PM »
While Barents and Kara sea temperatures are much warmer than average and Chuckchi warmer than usual I see that Hudson & Baffin have been slightly but clearly and continuosly below normal, so a late & fast refreezing can be expected respectively. EES, Canadian Arctic and Beaufort will be totally frozen soon if they arent already. What I see about IJIS data is an slightly faster refreeze than average, in which we have sort of sporadic "mini-cycles" of 3-4 days below average (first day worsening, second the lowest refreeze , third staying about the same and fourth the "recovery" in daily extent increases.

BornFromTheVoid

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Re: IJIS
« Reply #1749 on: November 04, 2015, 01:16:23 PM »
IJIS:

8,675,338 km2(November 3, 2015)up 40,937 km2 from previous.

 :o :o :o :o :o

The trend is now making a power dive at the 2007/2012 numbers.  This is just crazy.

(EDIT: BFTV's post for reference; the last few days have been 20-50K/day below the long term trend, and over 100K/day below 2011/2012.)

http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1112.msg65563.html#msg65563

My own data uses the 5 day average, as do the NSIDC. Using that, the last 5 days (single day changes) have been 98.6k (69k), 81.8k (134k), 93.8k (165k), 116.2k (151k) and 129.2k (40k), averaged that's 104k/day (112k/day).

Some large day to day variations, but still well above the 81-10 average 82k/day (88k/day) and close to the average of the last 10 years of 114k/day (112k/day).
I recently joined the twitter thing, where I post more analysis, pics and animations: @Icy_Samuel