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Sigmetnow

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Andes Glaciers
« on: May 06, 2018, 12:44:49 AM »
In 1941, Lake Palcacocha spewed a glacial lake outburst flood that destroyed the city of Huaraz, Peru.  Today, fueled by tourism, Huaraz has grown into the second largest city in the central Peruvian Andes—its population has quadrupled.  And the volume of the lake is now 34 times greater than it was in 1941 — a ticking time bomb of 4.5 billion gallons of water.

Beneath a Melting Glacier, a Peruvian Town Prepares For the Worst
https://earther.com/beneath-a-melting-glacier-a-peruvian-town-prepares-for-1825713749
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Martin Gisser

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2018, 03:37:20 AM »
Well, heck, somehow human overpopulation has to be killed off. Better flood than war, pestilence, or starvation. When will they ever learn? When will they ever learn...

magnamentis

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2018, 08:49:35 PM »
Well, heck, somehow human overpopulation has to be killed off. Better flood than war, pestilence, or starvation. When will they ever learn? When will they ever learn...

good question, the answer is never before extinction. how comes i see it that way, because of history while extinction in the past was local, tribes, kingdoms etc. and now that we're globalised it will perhaps be global but at least more widely spread so to say ;)

however, thinking about things like that i know exactly why i'm a huge fan of science fiction or space exploration, it's the only chance we have, latest once the red giant will swallow us in about 4 billion years LOL

Susan Anderson

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2018, 08:35:57 PM »
Well, heck, somehow human overpopulation has to be killed off. Better flood than war, pestilence, or starvation. When will they ever learn? When will they ever learn...

good question, the answer is never before extinction. how comes i see it that way, because of history while extinction in the past was local, tribes, kingdoms etc. and now that we're globalised it will perhaps be global but at least more widely spread so to say ;)

however, thinking about things like that i know exactly why i'm a huge fan of science fiction or space exploration, it's the only chance we have, latest once the red giant will swallow us in about 4 billion years LOL

Trouble is the environmental and financial cost of going to Mars (or anywhere else) is astronomical and impractical, while the cost of fixing things here is only unaffordable because a staggering fraction of earth's apex predators haven't learned how to think reflect, and act as a community for mutual benefit.

ReverendMilkbone

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2018, 07:41:42 PM »

kassy

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Re: Andes Glaciers
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2019, 10:55:47 AM »
South America’s Glaciers May Have a Bigger Problem Than Climate Change

Casassa is standing at the foot of a glacier, 4,200 meters (13,800 feet) above sea level. The sky over the Andes is a deep blue, but something is not right: It’s July—mid-winter in South America—and yet it’s mild for the time of year, above 0 degrees Centigrade. He takes off his orange ski jacket and walks on the bare rock.

“This should all be covered by snow this time of year,” he says, pointing to Olivares Alfa, one of the largest glaciers in central Chile, just a few meters away. “There used to be one single glacier system covering this whole valley; now it’s pulled back so much that it’s divided into four or five smaller glaciers.”

Chile has one of the world’s largest reserves of fresh water outside the north and south poles, but the abundant glaciers that are the source of that precious commodity are melting fast. That’s not just an ecological disaster in the making, it’s rapidly becoming an economic and political dilemma for the government of Latin America’s richest nation.

 
A toxic cocktail of rising temperatures, the driest nine-year period on record and human activity, including mining, is proving lethal for the ice of Chile’s central region. Built up over thousands of years, the ice mass is now retreating one meter per year on average.

...

An academic paper from 2010 found that a third of all rock glaciers in central Chile had been directly impacted by mining activities such as road building, drilling platforms and depositing waste on top of the ice. In addition, dust from trucks and explosions in pits as well as vibrations from heavy machinery accelerate the melting. Mining itself is water intensive since it’s needed in each step to produce copper, with usage forecast to rise.


https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/south-america-s-glaciers-may-have-a-bigger-problem-than-climate-change-1.1301277
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