Support the Arctic Sea Ice Forum and Blog

Author Topic: Unsorted  (Read 24155 times)

kassy

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 760
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 275
  • Likes Given: 331
Re: Unsorted
« Reply #200 on: October 16, 2019, 10:36:50 AM »
Study Casts Doubt on One of Our Key Assumptions About The 'Powerhouse of The Cell'


But an important new study suggests they're actually more like the cutting edge battery packs inside Tesla's cars - with each fold inside the mitochondria providing power independently.

And that actually makes a lot of sense. The reason Tesla's become such a big name in electric cars and power storage is because their battery systems are capable of packing a whole lot of energy into a small space - while ensuring the failure of one part doesn't bring down the whole setup.

Now new research by American and German scientists suggests that nature may have thought up a similar system first.

...

To test the one mitochondrion/one battery model, the endocrinologist and his team used high resolution microscopy and staining techniques to observe the fine details of mitochondria inside several different types of human cell.

The staining also allowed them to determine how a voltage difference called the mitochondrial membrane potential varied along the meandering curtain of inner membrane.

If the whole membrane had the same potential, or if everything depolarised when a single cristae was damaged, a single mitochondrion could be considered to be acting as a unit. But that isn't what Shirihai and his team saw at all.

"What the images told us was that each of these cristae is electrically independent, functioning as an autonomous battery," says Shirihai.

"One cristae can get damaged and stop functioning while the others maintain their membrane potential."

https://www.sciencealert.com/tiny-power-units-inside-our-cells-act-more-like-an-electric-car-s-battery-than-we-thought
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

wdmn

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 346
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 62
  • Likes Given: 48
Re: Unsorted - Canadian Election 2019
« Reply #201 on: October 21, 2019, 09:33:03 PM »
Canadians are voting today.

Nationally there are four main parties (plus a party that only runs in the province of Quebec): the Liberals (who are currently in power), the Conservatives, the NDP (slightly left of centre), and the Green Party.

The Conservative Party wants to scrap the carbon tax that was just brought in this year by the Liberal Party (and has been praised highly by James Hansen). The Conservatives are also very pro-pipeline expansion, though the Liberal Party also intends to build at least one more pipeline (Trans-Mountain).

The Greens have two seats going into this election, and it was thought that this would be a big chance for them, however, the NDP seem to have been surging in the last couple of weeks.

There's been a lot of talk about vote splitting (as always); people are afraid of the conservatives getting in power and are being encouraged to vote Liberal. However, it looks like we might end up with a minority government, where no one party has enough seats to govern, thus forcing a coalition. In certain scenarios a coalition government could give the Green Party significant influence.

Results should start coming in in about 4 hours from now.

TerryM

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5225
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 407
  • Likes Given: 5
Re: Unsorted
« Reply #202 on: October 21, 2019, 10:04:38 PM »
I'm off to check off the Liberal box at the polls. Harpers reign is too fresh in my mind to take a chance on voting for any of the other party even though my own politics is much more closely aligned with the NDP's platform. Trudeau has been a huge disappointment, but the possibility of another Conservative government is as real as Cambridge Analitica flipping a few well chosen seats.


ABC - Anyone But Conservatives
Terry

nanning

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 879
  • 0Kg CO2, 35 KWh/wk,130L H2O/wk, No heating
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 135
  • Likes Given: 5783
Re: Unsorted
« Reply #203 on: October 22, 2019, 06:38:13 AM »
Why not vote for the greenest party Terry?
I don't know your GRN party's integrity but from wdmn's emissions projections graph, they are nicely ambitious. The rest aren't.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
   Simple: minimize your possessions and be free and kind    It's just a mindset.       Refugees welcome

wdmn

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 346
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 62
  • Likes Given: 48
Re: Unsorted
« Reply #204 on: October 22, 2019, 09:07:41 PM »
The results are final.

The Liberals were given a minority government. In order to pass legislation they will need the help of either the Conservatives, the Bloc Quebecois (a Quebec sovereignty party that is quite progressive on climate change), or the NDP.

The two main oil producing provinces (Alberta and Saskatchewan) only elected one non-conservative member of parliament between them.

In much of the rest of the country (especially the urban centres) it seems that many went the route of Terry and voted Liberal out of fear of vote splitting leading to a Conservative government. For many people this was connected to a fear of moving backwards on climate change action.

The Green Party increased their number of seats from 2 to 3, and doubled their percentage of the popular vote from the previous election. The First Past the Post system ensured that though they received only slightly fewer votes than the Bloc Quebecois, they won 1/10th of the seats.

We'll see how long this government lasts... but it seems that the federal carbon tax is safe for now. Will the Liberals be able to build their Trans Mountain pipeline?

TerryM

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5225
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 407
  • Likes Given: 5
Re: Unsorted
« Reply #205 on: October 22, 2019, 11:17:45 PM »
The results in Canada are encouraging.


Trudeau's appeasement of western energy interests cost him votes in the rest of the country, while not bringing him a single seat in the west. Who will push the pipeline forward now?


The Parties that the Liberals now need the cooperation of are all greener and further to the left, so I expect Trudeau to initiate programs more to my liking, and more to the liking of those, like I, who held their nose as they checked the Liberal candidate's box.


Trudeau's tough on Russia agenda didn't win him any votes in the west where Ukrainian Canadians voted for the Conservative Party. We'll see if our Canadian version of Cookie Lady Nuland, Chrystia Freeland, retains her position.


If Trudeau was taking a right wing  "hawkish" stance in hopes of luring former Harper voters to his camp, and if he was hoping that pushing a pipeline would gain him western acceptance, this election should have taught him that these policies have only alienated his base. I believe he's bright enough and flexible enough to return to the green, peaceable policies that won his first election.


At least I hope that these are the lessons learned.
Terry

vox_mundi

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1632
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 640
  • Likes Given: 113
Re: Unsorted
« Reply #206 on: November 06, 2019, 05:34:52 PM »
Researchers Find Connection Between Pathogen History and Degree of Moral Vitalism
https://phys.org/news/2019-11-pathogen-history-degree-moral-vitalism.html

An international team of researchers has found evidence that suggests the degree of moral vitalism—believing in forces of good and evil—in a given society may be related to its pathogen history.

Historians have known for some time that people from earlier times had a tendency to blame the devil or evil spirits for their misfortunes. There is also ample evidence of people blaming diseases on such spirits as well—the reaction by many to the Black Death in Europe is a prime example. In this new effort, the researchers wondered if attributing disease to such spirits might confer an evolutionary advantage.

The researchers looked at data from prior research efforts aimed at better understanding the role the evil eye and the devil have played in various cultures. To gain a better perspective on the data they obtained, they created models that compared the pathogen history of each with the degree of moral vitalism. They report that doing so revealed a pattern: societies that faced more diseases tended to exhibit higher moral vitalism.

In an additional study researchers found what they describe as a clear association in behavior patterns. Those study participants living in places where they were more likely to contract a serious disease tended to have a higher degree of moral vitalism—and they were more likely to engage in behaviors meant to protect themselves from such spirits.

The researchers conclude by suggesting that taken together, the data from the three studies suggests that there is a connection between pathogen history and level of moral vitalism. And they further suggest that it appears to confer an evolutionary advantage. Someone who believes the devil is responsible for making someone sick, for example, will likely take action to avoid being around that person, keeping them safe.


Ned Flanders speaks

Open Access: Brock Bastian et al. Explaining illness with evil: pathogen prevalence fosters moral vitalism, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2019)
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1632
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 640
  • Likes Given: 113
Re: Unsorted
« Reply #207 on: November 06, 2019, 06:23:33 PM »
Learning is Optimized When We Fail 15% of the Time
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-11-optimized.html

Educators and educational scholars have long recognized that there is something of a "sweet spot" when it comes to learning. That is, we learn best when we are challenged to grasp something just outside the bounds of our existing knowledge. When a challenge is too simple, we don't learn anything new; likewise, we don't enhance our knowledge when a challenge is so difficult that we fail entirely or give up.

So where does the sweet spot lie? According to the new study, to be published in the journal Nature Communications, it's when failure occurs 15% of the time. Put another way, it's when the right answer is given 85% of the time.

"These ideas that were out there in the education field—that there is this 'zone of proximal difficulty,' in which you ought to be maximizing your learning—we've put that on a mathematical footing," said UArizona assistant professor of psychology and cognitive science Robert Wilson, lead author of the study, titled "The Eighty Five Percent Rule for Optimal Learning."

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-12552-4
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1632
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 640
  • Likes Given: 113
Re: Unsorted
« Reply #208 on: November 08, 2019, 04:47:50 PM »
Microsoft HoloLens mimics STNG HoloDeck



Building the First Holographic Brain 'Atlas'
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-11-holographic-brain-atlas.html

A team of researchers, led by Case Western Reserve University scientists and technicians using the Microsoft HoloLens mixed reality platform, has created what is believed to be the first interactive holographic mapping system of the axonal pathways in the human brain.

"More than 100 clinicians have had a chance to beta test this so far and the excitement around the technology has been exceptional," McIntyre said, adding that the method is already dramatically advancing scientists' understanding of the complexities associated with certain, targeted brain surgeries.

The new research incorporates decades of valuable, but disconnected, neural data from dozens of sources and transforms them into a fully three-dimensional and interactive visualization. Users of the technology, including neural engineers, neuroanatomists, neurologists, and neurosurgeons, are able to see both the animated "atlas" of the brain via the HoloLens headset—and the axonal connections in front of them.


Computer; End program.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1632
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 640
  • Likes Given: 113
Re: Unsorted
« Reply #209 on: November 09, 2019, 06:30:52 PM »
'Orangutan Granted Legal 'Personhood' Settles Into New Florida Home
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/orangutan-granted-legal-personhood-settles-new-florida-home-n1079261

Judge Elena Liberatori's landmark ruling in 2015 declared that Sandra is legally not an animal, but a non-human person, thus entitled to some legal rights enjoyed by people, and better living conditions.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

vox_mundi

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1632
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 640
  • Likes Given: 113
Re: Unsorted
« Reply #210 on: Today at 12:37:42 AM »
Hell Yes, Weird Ice Disk Season Is Upon Us
https://earther.gizmodo.com/hell-yes-weird-ice-disk-season-is-upon-us-1839869456



Video emerged on Thursday of the first known swirly ice disk of the season. While smaller than the monstrous platter of ice that clogged Maine’s Presumpscot River last year, the new floating circle of ice spotted in Haynesville, Maine is still pretty cool.
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late