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Author Topic: What's new in the Arctic ?  (Read 135143 times)

nanning

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #400 on: August 26, 2019, 07:42:25 AM »
@oren
You mean something's going to happen to Santa? That IS serious  ::)
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Jim Hunt

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #401 on: August 26, 2019, 11:38:56 AM »
Santa Claus maintains the sign.  (duh!)  ::)

Here's the evidence:
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vox_mundi

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #402 on: August 29, 2019, 02:36:15 AM »
Russia Discovers 5 Arctic Islands as Glaciers Melt
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/08/28/russia-discovers-five-islands-climate-change-melts-arctic-ice/amp/
https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2019/08/28/russia-discovers-5-arctic-islands-as-glaciers-melt-a67051

The Russian military has officially confirmed the discovery of five new Arctic islands which have emerged as climate change accelerates glacial melting.

Ranging in size from 900 to 54,500 square metres, the five tiny islands are located in the cove of Vize off the northeastern shore of Novaya Zemlya, which divides the Barents and Kara seas in the Arctic ocean, a defence ministry statement said.

The islands were previously concealed under the Nansen glacier, also known as the Vylka, which is part of Europe's largest ice cap covering much of Novaya Zemlya's northern island.

The retreat of Arctic ice amid rising air and ocean temperatures has been unveiling unknown landforms. In 2015-18, the hydrographic service observed more than 30 islands, capes and bays near Novaya Zemlya and Franz Josef Land for the first time through satellite monitoring. More are expected to be found.

A US study last year concluded that the ice loss by glaciers on Franz Josef Land had doubled between 2011 and 2015.
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kassy

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #403 on: September 17, 2019, 01:04:49 PM »
Turning the Arctic brown

Despite this, from a scientific point of view, much of the Arctic is unexplored and unknown. One thing we know for certain is that for approximately 35 years it has seen increasing growth of vegetation — a process known as ‘Arctic greening’. However, now it looks as though some of it might actually be turning brown.

When satellites in space detect plants on Earth they measure the ‘greenness index’, in other words, how green the ground cover of plants is. How lush the foliage on the ground appears from space can represent a number of aspects down on earth, from plant growth to leaf area. But if areas of the Arctic are browning, it may indicate something else as well: plant death.

The plant death can be a result of extreme weather events, which are becoming more frequent in the Arctic as the climate warms. A sudden period of warmth in the middle of winter tricks the plants into thinking it’s spring, so they burst bud early and lose their cold hardiness, leaving them unprepared for a return to normal cold winter temperatures. The plant die-back that follows the events of this ‘extreme winter warming’ also appear to be significantly reducing the ability of Arctic ecosystems to help combat climate change.

https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/news/nr/arctic-browning-1.864694
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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #404 on: September 17, 2019, 01:46:05 PM »
Strange that would be a new thing. You can always have a warm snap.
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kassy

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #405 on: September 23, 2019, 02:16:25 PM »
Modeling of physical mechanisms for ice mass loss from marine and marine-terminating glaciers is a complex matter; which consensus climate model not yet adequately address, as illustrated by the linked reference which studied observations of marine-terminating glaciers in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago to find that atmospheric forcing has dominated the observed image mass loss.  To me the difficulties in modeling marine and marine-terminating glacial ice mass loss represents a significant risk to society with continued global warming.

Alison J. Cook et al. (13 Mar 2019), "Atmospheric forcing of rapid marine-terminating glacier retreat in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago", Science Advances, Vol. 5, no. 3, eaau8507, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aau8507

https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/5/3/eaau8507.full

Abstract: "The Canadian Arctic Archipelago contains >300 glaciers that terminate in the ocean, but little is known about changes in their frontal positions in response to recent changes in the ocean-climate system. Here, we examine changes in glacier frontal positions since the 1950s and investigate the relative influence of oceanic temperature versus atmospheric temperature. Over 94% of glaciers retreated between 1958 and 2015, with a region-wide trend of gradual retreat before ~2000, followed by a fivefold increase in retreat rates up to 2015. Retreat patterns show no correlation with changes in subsurface ocean temperatures, in clear contrast to the dominance of ocean forcing in western Greenland and elsewhere. Rather, significant correlations with surface melt indicate that increased atmospheric temperature has been the primary driver of the acceleration in marine-terminating glacier frontal retreat in this region."

Extract: "It is now widely acknowledged that ocean temperature increase has been the dominant driver of glacier retreat in other polar regions in recent years, particularly along the western Antarctic Peninsula, around the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, and in western Greenland. In contrast, we show that, in the CAA, the substantial rise in atmospheric temperature in the 21st century has outweighed any regional impact of changing ocean temperature on marine-terminating glacier frontal behavior. It follows that ocean temperature cannot be assumed to be the primary driver of marine-terminating glacier retreat in all polar regions and that studies of local processes are needed to understand the impacts of climate change on glacier behavior."

Bolding mine. I think this is possibly an interesting detail about the region.
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vox_mundi

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #406 on: September 24, 2019, 12:26:51 AM »
Walrus - 1; Russian Navy - nil

Walrus Attacks Russian Navy, Sinking Inflatable Boat
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2019/09/walruses-attack-russian-navy-sinking-inflatable-boat/

Last week, a Russian Navy rescue tug—the Altai from the Northern Fleet—dispatched a rigid inflatable boat to Wilczek Island in the Franz Josef Land archipelago, which is an Arctic island chain occupied only by wildlife and Russian military personnel. Aboard the boat were sailors and scientists from the Russian Geographic Society, and as they attempted a landing at Cape Geller, their boat was attacked and sunk by a female walrus, "[which] she probably did fearing for her cubs," an RGO news release noted.

While the boat sank, the crew leader managed to get the boat close enough to land for everyone to get ashore safely, according to the RGO's spokesperson.

No walruses were harmed, according to the Northern Fleet

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Tom_Mazanec

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #407 on: September 24, 2019, 09:57:38 PM »
Scientists set sail on yearlong expedition to Arctic centre
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/arctic-centre-scientist-expedition-german-icebreaker-rv-polarstern-1.5293837
Quote
Researchers from more than a dozen nations launched Friday the biggest and most complex expedition ever attempted in the central Arctic — a yearlong journey through the ice they hope will improve the scientific models that underpin our understanding of climate change.

The 140-million euro ($158 million Cdn) expedition will see scientists from 19 countries including Germany, the United States, Britain, France, Russia and China work together in one of the most inhospitable regions of the planet.
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Niall Dollard

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #408 on: September 24, 2019, 11:25:23 PM »
Scientists set sail on yearlong expedition to Arctic centre


MOSAiC.

https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2906.0.html

There is already a stickied thread open on this, above.

kassy

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #409 on: September 26, 2019, 02:07:20 PM »
An interesting proposal to safe ice?

Quote
Tiny glass beads might seem an unlikely hero in the fight against climate change, but they may end up playing an outsize role in tackling one of the natural world’s most dire predicaments. A group of researchers have found that millions of these spheres spread in a layer across swaths of Arctic ice reflects sunlight and helps keep the ice frozen.

...

Field calls her idea “an embarrassingly simple concept.” Warmer temperatures have reduced the bright white multiyear ice (essentially thicker, stiffer ice) in the Arctic, and the resulting loss in light reflectivity leads to heating and further ice melt. “I just asked myself a very simple question: Is there a safe material that could help replace that lost reflectivity?” Field says. The answer, her team found, was to add a very thin layer of hollow glass spheres made of silica, the main component of most rocks, that reflect light and “make very thin ice look a lot more like multi-year ice.”

...

Last year, the team covered almost 18,000 square yards on lake ice in Utqiagvik (previously Barrow), Alaska, for pilot tests. While they work on permitting with the Environmental Protection Agency for testing on sea ice, they are collaborating with NASA on modeling.

The results so far are encouraging. In May 2018, the team published a peer-reviewed paper in the American Geophysical Union’s Earth’s Future journal, revealing the results and projections of their initial pilot testing. In one field test, the material increased reflectivity by 15 to 20 percent. Their models have predicted the beads could significantly stop ice decline and even reverse it. Simulations showed a potential 1.5 degrees Celsius temperature reduction over a large part of the Arctic, a 3-degree sea temperature reduction in some areas, and an increase in sea ice thickness of up to 20 inches.
and more on:
https://www.motherjones.com/environment/2019/09/arctic-ice-is-melting-faster-than-expected-these-scientists-have-a-radical-idea-to-save-it/
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nanning

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #410 on: September 26, 2019, 06:03:53 PM »
^^
I'm sure they have the best of intentions but, it is a form a geo-engineering, a techno-fix. With likely unintended and bad consequences. When will 'we' (civilisation) ever learn?  :(

'We' have to stop to try and control nature. It's been disastrous.
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blumenkraft

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #411 on: September 26, 2019, 06:32:56 PM »
How much CO2 is emitted making that glass?
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binntho

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blumenkraft

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #413 on: October 03, 2019, 05:37:16 AM »
Refugees welcome

blumenkraft

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #414 on: October 07, 2019, 04:56:10 PM »
Scotland proposing to be Europe´s gateway to the Arctic

Quote
The Scottish government published its first Arctic Policy Framework on 23 September 2019. On that occasion Scotland´s External Affairs Secretary said, “Scotland has the expertise and vision to serve as a link between the Arctic region and the wider world with opportunities to help tackle issues such as sustainable tourism, renewable energy and climate change.”

The news Arctic Connections on the Scottish Government webpage claim that 27.5% of Scotland´s overseas exports in the year 2017 is related to trading with countries that have territories in the Arctic and that these major trading partners are also the origin of nearly half of all foreign direct investments in Scotland. It continues with stating that “The framework sets ambitions for Scotland across the Arctic while encouraging academia, civic society and government organisations to have a greater level of collaboration with international counterparts.”


Link >> https://arcticportal.org/ap-library/news/2209-scotland-proposing-to-be-europe-s-gateway-to-the-arctic
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blumenkraft

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #415 on: October 08, 2019, 04:13:54 PM »
Here's a nice Arte doku about the Arktis. Sorry, only in German and French available. :(

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Stephan

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #416 on: October 08, 2019, 10:35:03 PM »
Sorry, only in German and French available. :(

No sorryness. Both languages fit well to me   ;)
It is too late just to be concerned about Climate Change

charles_oil

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #417 on: October 09, 2019, 12:10:09 AM »
Any chance you could put the French language link as well ?

Sigmetnow

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #418 on: November 05, 2019, 03:21:24 AM »
Zack Labe on Twitter: "Yikes ...”
https://mobile.twitter.com/zlabe/status/1191404874526687233
Image below.
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Sigmetnow

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #419 on: November 08, 2019, 03:51:55 AM »
Kris Van Steenbergen on Twitter: "We're heading to the hottest Arctic fall season in 3M years. Entire basin & Greenland 16°C to 28°C warmer than normal.”
https://mobile.twitter.com/krvast/status/1192379141880000512
Image below. GIF at the link.
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kassy

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #420 on: November 08, 2019, 01:54:27 PM »
Climate change: Sea ice loss linked to spread of deadly virus

The decline in sea ice seen in the Arctic in recent decades has been linked by scientists to the spread of a deadly virus in marine mammals.

Researchers found that Phocine distemper virus (PDV) had spread from animals in the North Atlantic to populations in the North Pacific.

The scientists say the spread of pathogens could become more common as ice declines further.

The 15-year study tracked seals, sea lions and otters via satellite.

for details see:
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-50333627
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vox_mundi

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #421 on: November 12, 2019, 04:29:03 PM »
Satellite Data Shows Loss of Snow Cover, Not Soot to Blame for Rapid Temperature Rise in Arctic
https://phys.org/news/2019-11-satellite-loss-soot-blame-rapid.html

A team of researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the University of Washington and the University of Wisconsin-Madison has found evidence that shows the rapid rise of temperatures in the Arctic is caused by the loss of snow and ice cover, and not soot. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes studying satellite data for the region over a 32-year period, and what it showed them about surface temperatures

The researchers report that they found a 1.25-to-1.51 percent per decade absolute reduction in mean surface albedo for the Arctic during the spring and summer seasons. They also found that the reduction in snow and ice cover for sea ice, snow cover over the sea and snow covering the ground contributed equally to the reductions in albedo. They conclude by suggesting that surface temperature warming combined with a reduction in snowfall have been the primary reasons for the rapid increase in temperatures in the Arctic.

This finding is in direct contrast to prior studies blaming soot for the decrease in albedo. To back up their claim, the researchers note that soot covering snow in the Arctic has been declining over the past three decades, yet the rise in surface temperatures has continued unabated.



Albedo trend. Area- and energy-weighted average of multimonth (March to September of each year) mean (A) surface albedo over the entire Arctic and (B) planetary albedo over the Arctic oceanic area (north of 60°N).

Rudong Zhang et al. Unraveling driving forces explaining significant reduction in satellite-inferred Arctic surface albedo since the 1980s, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2019).
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vox_mundi

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #422 on: November 15, 2019, 12:16:57 AM »
Couldn't figure out where to put this so ...

Sea Ice Movements Trace Dynamics Transforming the New Arctic
https://phys.org/news/2019-11-floe-sea-ice-movements-dynamics.html

Research led by the University of California, Riverside, is the first to use moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer, or MODIS, satellite imagery to understand long-term ocean movements from sea ice dynamics. (... I think A-Team might beg to differ)

... "No one had bothered before to use MODIS because the satellite is sensitive to clouds and it's hard to identify ice," Martinez said. "Our algorithm automatically filters clouds and uses other image processing algorithms that give the velocity and trajectory of the ice floes."

"MODIS data is one of the longest records of earth ever compiled," said first author Rosalinda Lopez, a graduate student in Martinez's lab. "This means that we are able to expand our analysis to almost two decades to observe the variability of sea ice as dramatic changes transform the region."



R.Lopez-Acosta, et.al. Ice Floe Tracker: An algorithm to automatically retrieve Lagrangian trajectories via feature matching from moderate-resolution visual imagery, Remote Sensing of Environment (2019)

Abstract:

Satellite observations of sea ice along marginal ice zones suggest a strong coupling between sea ice transport and the underlying ocean turbulent eddy field. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite imagery spanning over almost two decades of daily observations at a resolution of up to 250  m provides a good resource for deriving long-term ocean kinematics from sea ice dynamics.

In this paper, we present a newly developed automatic algorithm to retrieve dynamic measurements of sea ice from these images. We describe the methodology by presenting results acquired along the East Greenland Current (ECG) for 6.5  weeks in the spring of 2017. During this period, our ice floe tracker was used to identify and track ice floes with length scales ranging from 8 to 65  km. By effectively filtering atmospheric conditions from MODIS images, ice floes were tracked for up to ten consecutive days, and a total of 1061 trajectories were retrieved.

 A southward mean sea ice flow associated with the ECG was observed along with deviations in both direction and magnitude, suggesting the effect of an underlying turbulent eddy field. The absolute position and tracking errors associated with our method are 255  m and 0.65  cm/s, respectively, each derived from a comparison between manually and automatically identified ice floes. Going forward, our methodology will be employed to process longer time sequences to analyze nonlinear interactions between drifting ice floes and the upper ocean turbulent eddy field in the ECG as well as to investigate other prominent regions of the Arctic Ocean.
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sidd

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #423 on: November 15, 2019, 05:30:05 AM »
Thats a nice paper by Acosta et al.
Looking forward to arctic wide  analysis.

sidd

binntho

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Re: What's new in the Arctic ?
« Reply #424 on: November 15, 2019, 02:33:13 PM »
Agree
because a thing is eloquently expressed it should not be taken to be as necessarily true
St. Augustine, Confessions V, 6