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Shared Humanity

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #900 on: December 08, 2018, 10:05:09 PM »
That is one highly mobile ice pack. Fram and Nares export continues apace and some of that MYI transported from the Beaufort to the Chukchi appears to have melted.

Aluminium

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #901 on: December 09, 2018, 08:48:51 AM »
December 3-8.

oren

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #902 on: December 09, 2018, 08:59:40 AM »
December 3-8.
With the Kara continuing to be blown back, seemingly the same wind regime has been pushing Chukchi ice into growth mode, and CAB ice into Fram export, thus achieving slightly above average growth.
I repeat my prediction that once the Kara process revereses, as it evntually will, we will see oversized extent gains - at least for a few days.

gerontocrat

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #903 on: December 09, 2018, 09:15:54 AM »
December 3-8.
With the Kara continuing to be blown back, seemingly the same wind regime has been pushing Chukchi ice into growth mode, and CAB ice into Fram export, thus achieving slightly above average growth.
I repeat my prediction that once the Kara process revereses, as it evntually will, we will see oversized extent gains - at least for a few days.
"With the Kara continuing to be blown back". If it was only wind causing the ice front to retreat, surely one would see greater compaction. Looking at Aluminium's gif, there are signs of reduced compaction. Perhaps ocean heat transport is also having an effect (i.e. some of the extent loss is actually melt) ?

Mind you, that still means when the weather pattern changes there will be rapid extent gains. That weather pattern still looks like hanging on for a few more days.
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uniquorn

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #904 on: December 10, 2018, 11:24:33 AM »
SMOS is a good indicator of ice thickness up to 0.5m at this time of year. It doesn't look like it is only compaction in the Kara Sea. Too cloudy recently for viirs.
Uni-Bremen, dec1-9.

Worldview, Fram Strait, dec10 with mercator 0m temperature inset bottom left. Cloud over the warm current south of Svalbard, ice melting at it's northern end where it sinks into the depths.
https://tinyurl.com/ybrnrbyn
edit: Ice can also be seen melting along the ice front as the rest of the current turns east along the north Svalbard coast
« Last Edit: December 10, 2018, 11:34:23 AM by uniquorn »

Dharma Rupa

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #905 on: December 10, 2018, 02:18:41 PM »
The (ESRL) freezing season so far:

gerontocrat

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #906 on: December 10, 2018, 02:44:44 PM »
DMI SSTs as at 9 Dec attached.

Will weather push ocean warmth at the ice, or will the reverse happen?
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vox_mundi

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #907 on: December 11, 2018, 05:16:51 PM »
Sudden Stratospheric Warming Linked To Open Water in Polar Ice Pack
https://phys.org/news/2018-12-sudden-stratospheric-linked-polar-ice.html

Quote


Though not especially rare in some parts of the Arctic, the north Greenland polynya of February 2018 was most unexpected. 50,000 km² of open water in the Wandel Sea, an area the size of the state of Kentucky or the province of Nova Scotia.

... In their paper, What caused the remarkable February 2018 Greenland Polynya?, Moore, Schweiger, Jinlun Zhang and Mike Steele identify the polynya's cause to be strong surface winds catalyzed by a dramatic warming in Earth's upper atmosphere known as a Sudden Stratospheric Warming.

"During these events, temperatures in the stratosphere – about 30km above ground level—can warm by 10° or 15°C in just a few days," Moore says.

"This causes a change in air circulation that includes a reversal in the winds in the stratosphere. These high altitude winds blow against the west-to-east direction of the jet stream, descending toward the Earth's surface. In February 2018, this caused winds from Siberia to blow cold air into northern Europe, creating a weather system that became known as the 'Beast from the East'. It brought temperatures of minus 20°C to northern Europe, and the same weather pattern moved warmer air northwards up the east coast of Greenland."

Strong southerly winds forced mild air to Greenland and beyond, but it wasn't their warmth that caused the polynya.

"Most Arctic warmings last a day or two," says Moore. "This lasted a week, and these were the warmest temperatures and strongest winds observed in north Greenland since observations began in the 1960s. Winds were close to hurricane force (93+km/h) and temperatures were above freezing. Once we got that piece of the puzzle, we realized it could be wind rather than warmth that caused the polynya."

While the size of the polynya was unprecedented over the period we have good data, it appears not to be tied to the thinning of the ice pack that has occurred over the same period. Simulations with the University of Washington's Pan-Arctic Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS) indicate that similar conditions would have created a polynya, even without the recent thinning of the ice north of Greenland.

G. W. K. Moore et al. What caused the remarkable February 2018 North Greenland Polynya?, Geophysical Research Letters (2018)
Quote
Abstract:

During late February and early March 2018, an unusual polynya was observed off the north coast of Greenland. This period was also notable for the occurrence of a sudden stratospheric warming (SSW). Here we use satellite and in‐situ data, a reanalysis and an ice‐ocean model to document the evolution of the polynya and its synoptic forcing. We show that its magnitude was unprecedented and that it was associated with the transient response to the SSW leading to anomalous warm southerly flow in north Greenland. Indeed, regional wind speeds and temperatures were the highest during February going back to the 1960s. There is evidence that the thinning sea ice has increased its wind‐driven mobility. However, we show that the polynya would have developed under thicker ice conditions representative of the late 1970s and that even with the predicted trend towards thinner sea ice, it will only open during enhanced southerly flow.

Plain Language Summary:

In late February 2018, satellite imagery revealed the presence of a large polynya (a region of reduced sea ice cover within the pack), in the Wandel Sea off the north coast of Greenland. Since this region is not known for the development of polynyas, this discovery generated interest among Arctic observers and in the science community, raising questions about the nature and cause of this unusual event. In this paper, we show that its opening coincided with a period of sustained and unusually warm winds from the south, with above‐freezing temperatures and wind speeds in excess of 25 m/s reported at local weather stations. February 2018 was also notable for a Sudden Stratospheric Warming event, in which an abrupt warming of the atmosphere between 10‐50 km altitude occurred in conjunction with a reversal of the stratospheric winds. We show this event was responsible for the polynya. We also use a computer model to confirm the dominant role of the winds in creating the polynya. Finally, we show that even with future thinning of sea ice due to climate change, extreme winds will remain necessary to create a polynya in this region over the next few decades.

Pointer to the 2017-2018 freezing season discussion
https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2141.msg143538.html#msg143538

and the ASIB
Talk about unprecedented
https://neven1.typepad.com/blog/2018/02/talk-about-unprecedented.html



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litesong

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #908 on: December 11, 2018, 08:22:25 PM »
High Arctic temperatures are fluctuating, but trending higher. Intense warming is occurring over northern Canada & will even strengthen in the next week. A portion of this Canadian heat is predicted to flow south, warming the continental U.S. AND flow north, continuing the High Arctic warming. The warming is pushing cold elements of Arctic weather to the south onto western Alaska & eastern Siberia.

Niall Dollard

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #909 on: December 11, 2018, 09:54:26 PM »
NSIDC Daily extent maps for Dec 10 2018 compared with Dec 10 2017.

2018 extent is up in the Chukchi, Eastern Hudson Bay and Hudson Strait.

2018 extent is down in Okhotsk, Barents and Kara Seas.

Thomas Barlow

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #910 on: December 11, 2018, 10:12:00 PM »
Re. The Freezing Season, because I believe we will see record low maximums this winter due to this, and previous years' demise, and this confirms what many on this forum have been recording.

Headline: "The Arctic we once knew is gone"

"The changes in the Arctic are happening faster than they’re happening anywhere else on the rest of the planet."" - Jeremy Mathis, a NOAA Arctic scientist.
'In 1985, the oldest ice (which is ice greater than four years old) comprised 16 percent of Arctic's total sea ice, the report concludes. But by March 2018, the old ice made up just 0.9 percent of the Arctic's ice, the report said.'
'That's a 95 percent reduction.'
"That older, thicker ice showed very clear signs of melting this year," said Mathis.

https://mashable.com/article/arctic-climate-change-2018/#HXVx0UwEUmq8

uniquorn

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #911 on: December 11, 2018, 10:48:58 PM »
Shearing along the Lomonosov ridge line, north of the Nares Strait.
Worldview, viirsbt15n, dec9-11

edit:cropped it down a bit
« Last Edit: December 11, 2018, 10:58:20 PM by uniquorn »

Aluminium

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #912 on: December 12, 2018, 07:30:05 AM »
December 6-11.

The Chukchi Sea is freezing.

oren

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #913 on: December 12, 2018, 08:20:18 AM »
December 6-11.

The Chukchi Sea is freezing.
And the Kara has stopped shrinking.

binntho

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #914 on: December 12, 2018, 09:52:59 AM »
December 6-11.

The Chukchi Sea is freezing.
And the Kara has stopped shrinking.
In fact the entire Atlantic front + Kara seems to be increasing.

uniquorn

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #915 on: December 12, 2018, 01:06:38 PM »
In fact the entire Atlantic front + Kara seems to be increasing.
That's one way of describing it.  Worldview link, https://tinyurl.com/y6wyep2b

gerontocrat

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #916 on: December 12, 2018, 01:36:32 PM »
Weather systems are still bringing winds and warmth from the south up the Atlantic Front. This presumably will at least slow the freeze even if extent loss stops.

On the other hand, the opposite seems to apply in the Pacific Gateway at least for the next few days..
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meddoc

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #917 on: December 12, 2018, 04:34:53 PM »
There is a potential Polar Vortex Collapse in 5 Days.

Brigantine

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #918 on: December 13, 2018, 12:03:04 AM »
Per CIS, the Parry Channel is mobile again.

Also, there's this one ARGO float sitting in the warm current NE of Svaalbard (~82N 39E).
It's taking profiles every day, and it's quite Atlantified there.

arctic-watcher

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #919 on: December 13, 2018, 06:59:53 AM »
Chukchi might be icing over in the next week or two if the GFS extended forecast holds decently true.
The GFS *always* overestimates cold over the highly saline SSTs up north, and does the inverse for the fresh SSTs to their south (Kara, HB). I would be this is another false alarm. The model bias is systemic and incorrigible...!

GFS and ECMWF forecasts for Chukchi were acccurate for the the last 10 days and continue the cold anomaly for at least another 3 to 5 days. 
Chukchi is on course to be iced over by this weekend.

uniquorn

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #920 on: December 13, 2018, 12:16:29 PM »
Per CIS, the Parry Channel is mobile again.

Also, there's this one ARGO float sitting in the warm current NE of Svaalbard (~82N 39E).
It's taking profiles every day, and it's quite Atlantified there.
Thank you Brigantine. Mclure Strait looks frozen but there is movement further south.
Will look at the ARGO float on the salinity thread. That looks worse than I thought.

ecmwf wave forecast dec13-22 from windy
edit: ~82N 39E is the northernmost open water top right, north of the westernmost FJL island.
added scale
« Last Edit: December 13, 2018, 08:25:07 PM by uniquorn »

Niall Dollard

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #921 on: December 13, 2018, 11:45:58 PM »

Chukchi is on course to be iced over by this weekend.

Overall this freezing season has been sluggish. Especially as it turns out, on the Atlantic side. Back on Oct 16th last, things were looking dire too for the Chukchi.

GoSouthYoungins made a reasonable prediction back then. I tended to agree with most of this. But I held out more hope for the Chukchi

I think we can make a pretty good guesstimate already for how the freezing season will pan out:

The Laptev Sea freeze will be several weeks delayed. This may be countered (not in effect, but in extent measurements) by an early freeze in the Hudson Bay.

The Chukchi Sea will likely be the real story (which will probably lead into Bering Sea anomalies as well). The delays will probably be record setting.

ESS, Beaufort, and CAA will probably be quicker to freeze than in recent years.

Barents and Kara have non-impressive SST anomalies but currently the ice edge is very far away. Likely nothing too interesting.

The other seas may change weather patterns but I don't think have a direct or predictable effect on the arctic, so I don't really care.

Agree, disagree?

I did go against the grain and suggested that it might not be so bad in the Chukchi. (This is of course all relatively speaking to the last two years. I do realise even now the Chukchi is still way behind climatology).

My prediction was based on the extensive stretch of old ice moving west across the Beaufort and also that something still remained of the ESS arm. Both of these might help ice extend into the Chukchi provided synoptics played ball - and they (synoptics) did. Making predictions re the Arctic can be a bit of a lottery and you can quickly end up with egg on your face but I was glad I made this one.


Agree, disagree?

I agree with that  summation.

Only comment i would  make is that maybe,if synoptic weather patterns play ball with an anticyclonic block to the northern Chukchi, that it might not be a record breaking late freeze up in the Chukchi. 
The Beaufort seems to be advancing well and if there was persistent easterlies this would gradually cool down the very high Chukchi SSTs. There is a long way to go though, admittedly.
Of course Chukchi may still be bombarded with warm southerlies , like last winter, so will wait and see.

Given the very warm SSTs in the Chukchi, it has been quite a turnaround. NWS Alaska forecast for Dec 17th shows it ice covered.


litesong

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #922 on: December 14, 2018, 01:07:09 PM »
Overall this freezing season has been sluggish.
Much of that sluggish appearance is due to average high temperatures in the High Arctic. But that doesn't mean weather conditions have NOT been changing. Along with southern warm fronts moving into the High Arctic, cold fronts from Canada & Greenland have also been intermittently leaking into the Arctic & High Arctic. Presently, a mix of high pressure systems in the High Arctic, surrounded by a series of low pressure systems further south, seem to assure that cold & warm fronts will continue their High Arctic contention for  the next week or so.

Aluminium

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #923 on: December 15, 2018, 09:50:09 AM »
December 9-14.

Niall Dollard

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #924 on: December 15, 2018, 05:37:15 PM »
Thanks Aluminium. Shows the closing in of the Chukchi.

My thoughts are now moving on to the Bering.

New ice is forming around St.Lawrence Island. By next Wednesday 19th NWS Alaska forecast map shows the ice surrounding the island.

This is a considerable change to what the Monthly Outlook on Nov 20th (from same website) predicted : "The ice edge is expected to reach Saint Lawrence Island by the end
of January".

arctic-watcher

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #925 on: December 15, 2018, 11:46:26 PM »
When did Chukchi ice over last year? 

magnamentis

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #926 on: December 16, 2018, 12:32:34 AM »
When did Chukchi ice over last year?

around the 5th of january 2018 as far as i see it, depends whether you ask for extent or area there might be a difference but definitely not mid december.
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uniquorn

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #927 on: December 16, 2018, 02:44:56 PM »
An amateur attempt to match argo float 3901910 to amsr2-uhh to see how close to the ice edge it travelled, aug18-dec14. It reported weekly until december and has been reporting daily since. Report (cycle) numbers are overlayed onto Greenland, bottom left.
The main observation is that the warm current alongside the ice front is ~2.5C at surface recently.

More details and data here https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2417.msg184302.html#msg184302

edit: "These data were collected and made freely available by the Coriolis project and programmes that contribute to it (http://www.coriolis.eu.org)."

« Last Edit: December 16, 2018, 08:32:11 PM by uniquorn »

oren

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #928 on: December 16, 2018, 03:06:26 PM »
Uniquorn that is the most superb animation. Thank you.

Shared Humanity

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #929 on: December 16, 2018, 03:37:05 PM »
Uniquorn that is the most superb animation. Thank you.

Agreed!

Shared Humanity

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #930 on: December 16, 2018, 03:40:27 PM »

arctic-watcher

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #931 on: December 16, 2018, 11:57:59 PM »
thank you.  and to Niall also. 

uniquorn

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #932 on: December 17, 2018, 12:21:03 PM »
Worldview, viirs,bt15n,dec16-17.  https://tinyurl.com/y75x8uxf
Westerly winds pushing large floes into the warm current north of Svalbard. Low concentration ice above the possible upwelling (just above centre) looks more like a whirlpool. Quite a turbulent forecast for this area tomorrow.

litesong

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #933 on: December 17, 2018, 06:18:43 PM »
Lately 2018 Arctic sea ice extent has been paralleling seasonal daily ice extents for past years. Now in one day, 2018 sea ice extent jumped 260,000 km2 & is 160,000 km2 greater than even the 2010's average sea ice extent. 2018 High Arctic temperatures did drop by 2+degC over the last few days, but in addition, several cold regions coinciding with Arctic sea ice edge freezing are in place. We'll see if this temporary excess freezing continues.   

Neven

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #934 on: December 17, 2018, 08:59:45 PM »
We'll see if this temporary excess freezing continues.

If it isn't an artifact.
Compare, compare, compare

Niall Dollard

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #935 on: December 17, 2018, 09:30:06 PM »
NWS Alaska Ice Stage map for 16th Dec shows that the old ice that was situated in the eastern Beaufort in Sept, moved west during the autumn and has moved south down the Chukchi below Cape Lisburne.

However above 75N there is a large area of only first year medium ice - this is consistent with a clockwise Beaufort gyre with more west to east movement above that latitude.

magnamentis

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #936 on: December 18, 2018, 01:53:57 AM »
We'll see if this temporary excess freezing continues.

If it isn't an artifact.

if we look at some maps like UH for example we clearly see the artifact kind of flaw on the atlantic side where strange patterns show east of greenland and north of iceland.

that's not a proof but i strongly assume that this is a false alarm (relieve)
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litesong

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #937 on: December 18, 2018, 08:56:03 AM »
Lately 2018 Arctic sea ice extent has been paralleling seasonal daily ice extents for past years. Now in one day, 2018 sea ice extent jumped 260,000 km2 & is 160,000 km2 greater than even the 2010's average sea ice extent. 2018 High Arctic temperatures did drop by 2+degC over the last few days, but in addition, several cold regions coinciding with Arctic sea ice edge freezing are in place. We'll see if this temporary excess freezing continues.
///////
Quoted by Neven:
 litesong on December 17, 2018, 06:18:43 PM   We'll see if this temporary excess freezing continues.
/////
Neven wrote:
If it isn't an artifact.
///////
litesong wrote:
Into the second day, the 2018 excess freezing settles down, but still increased, compared to 2010's daily sea ice average, from 160,000 km2 to 200,000 km2. As stated previously, severe cooling along Arctic sea ice edges may account for the present 2018 jumpy sea ice increase.

Neven

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #938 on: December 18, 2018, 10:00:33 AM »
If it isn't an artifact.

Casual correction: an artifact is something Indiana Jones finds. Artefact is an artificial product or effect observed in a natural system, especially one introduced by the technology used in scientific investigation or by experimental error.
Compare, compare, compare

binntho

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #939 on: December 18, 2018, 10:11:36 AM »
From Uni Bremen website:

Quote
Notice: Sea ice concentration: Data problem Dec 16, 2018

There is a gap of about 14 hours in the data for Dec 16, therefore the sea ice concentration data of Dec 16 are incomplete, In addition, apparently one swath had corrupted data, causing strange values in the Greenland Sea and Barents Sea. We will reprocess as soon as the data are complete.

False color from December 15 and 17 - just from eyeballing I would have guessed a small drop.


Neven

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #940 on: December 18, 2018, 10:33:36 AM »
False color from December 15 and 17 - just from eyeballing I would have guessed a small drop.

I did the same for JAXA in the area and extent thread:
Compare, compare, compare

binntho

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #941 on: December 18, 2018, 10:36:46 AM »
I know ... I know ... (voiceover by Sybil Fawlty) ... that's what gave me the idea!

oren

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #942 on: December 18, 2018, 11:42:39 AM »
Un-massive growth in Bering, nothing (or shrinkage) in Kara, nothing on the Atlantic front, I can't see where 300k came from.

Aluminium

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #943 on: December 18, 2018, 01:43:36 PM »
I can't see where 300k came from.
This is definitely strange.

Maybe, from the Antarctic? :)
JAXA ANTARCTIC Sea Ice Extent - 8,852,289 km2(December 17, 2018)

Extent loss of 428k , 181k greater than average on this day.

El Cid

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #944 on: December 18, 2018, 09:23:02 PM »
Significant stratospheric PV disruption coming up (possible splitting later?), 10hpa temps shown. This often leads to very funny weather up in the Arctic, and down at the midlatitudes as well. Could bring some excitement :)

magnamentis

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #945 on: December 18, 2018, 10:58:19 PM »
Lately 2018 Arctic sea ice extent has been paralleling seasonal daily ice extents for past years. Now in one day, 2018 sea ice extent jumped 260,000 km2 & is 160,000 km2 greater than even the 2010's average sea ice extent. 2018 High Arctic temperatures did drop by 2+degC over the last few days, but in addition, several cold regions coinciding with Arctic sea ice edge freezing are in place. We'll see if this temporary excess freezing continues.
///////
Quoted by Neven:
 litesong on December 17, 2018, 06:18:43 PM   We'll see if this temporary excess freezing continues.
/////
Neven wrote:
If it isn't an artifact.
///////
litesong wrote:
Into the second day, the 2018 excess freezing settles down, but still increased, compared to 2010's daily sea ice average, from 160,000 km2 to 200,000 km2. As stated previously, severe cooling along Arctic sea ice edges may account for the present 2018 jumpy sea ice increase.

it's only one day but due to the fact that it's 2-day average it affects the following days while it should be back to normal soon.

not totally sure about wheter the 2 days are correct but it's more than one day.
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johnm33

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #946 on: December 18, 2018, 11:20:02 PM »
I think it's a consolidation taking place after the recent new moon and the lows driving winds and  tides, all the periphery was disrupted and freezing slowed, now it's back on track. Wouldn't have predicted this 'recovery' of impetus but it's not that surprising, winters coming.

magnamentis

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #947 on: December 19, 2018, 01:46:45 PM »
I think it's a consolidation taking place after the recent new moon and the lows driving winds and  tides, all the periphery was disrupted and freezing slowed, now it's back on track. Wouldn't have predicted this 'recovery' of impetus but it's not that surprising, winters coming.

that's a bit jumping to conclusions against the obvious, you will see ;)
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litesong

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #948 on: December 19, 2018, 01:48:32 PM »
Artefact is an artificial product or effect observed in a natural system, especially one introduced by the technology used in scientific investigation or by experimental error.
Two days ago, after Arctic sea ice extent had been paralleling other years of Arctic sea ice rise in the Arctic fall & winter darkness, I noted JAXA Arctic sea ice extent datum JUMPED 260,000 km2 in one day, rising dramatically above the general seasonal Arctic sea ice increase. Neven, immediately posted that the JAXA data gathering might be at fault. Other long time followers of Arctic conditions, agreed that the one day datum might be suspect.
Now, JAXA data indicates a one day DROP in Arctic sea ice extent of the same 260,000 km2. It appears that Neven & other posters, aren't slaves to........ datum points.
« Last Edit: December 21, 2018, 04:57:29 PM by litesong »

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Re: The 2018/2019 freezing season
« Reply #949 on: December 19, 2018, 10:34:23 PM »
Quite a clear view of the Chukchi today on worldview.   https://tinyurl.com/ya43cwu6