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Author Topic: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves  (Read 20908 times)

RoxTheGeologist

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #150 on: February 05, 2019, 07:06:25 PM »

Is it possible to remote sense salinity with sea ice?

"Since no SMOS SSS can be derived over sea ice, only grid points with sea ice fraction lower than 30% have been used when comparing TOPAZ and SMOS SSS"

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-4292/10/11/1772/htm


uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #151 on: February 06, 2019, 02:09:00 PM »
Thanks for that RTG. Any examples from the 400MB data? I'm a bit tight on broadband volume and would need to budget for that.

Polarview image of the dark line north of Greenland in post 135. https://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,2417.msg187569.html#msg187569

Edit: While reading up on compressive strength I came across these crystal structure profiles in https://doi.org/10.1016/j.coldregions.2018.03.002 and wondered if they were perhaps relevant to this image. (scale on left is cm)
« Last Edit: February 07, 2019, 07:25:37 PM by uniquorn »

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #152 on: February 07, 2019, 07:12:35 PM »
Current surges at 34m into the Chukchi, mercator (model) jan1-feb6

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #153 on: February 10, 2019, 01:13:52 PM »
Detailed view of part of the dark line north of Greenland in polarview before it hits the Fram Strait. Fairly sure now that it originated in the Laptev as shown.
ascat 2018074(mar15), 2018317(nov13) and 2019025(jan25)
polarview, feb5-7

Shared Humanity

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #154 on: February 10, 2019, 03:59:21 PM »
That animation would sure seem to suggest that the transpolar drift is alive and well.

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #155 on: February 10, 2019, 07:05:37 PM »
That animation would sure seem to suggest that the transpolar drift is alive and well.
Or a huge broom sweeping the old ice out of the arctic ;)

All the whoi ITP buoys are heading north. 104 has gone off the map, 105 shortly to follow, hopefully not taking all the fresh water with them. Looks like 107 has some interesting data when it settles down. 109 and 110 sticking above the warm patch.

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #156 on: February 12, 2019, 12:33:34 PM »
update on mercator 0m salinity jul2017-feb2019.
Still wondering about the Lincoln Sea so here is CAA enlarged and speeded up to highlight long term movement.(same dates)
« Last Edit: February 12, 2019, 12:52:22 PM by uniquorn »

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #157 on: February 12, 2019, 07:13:46 PM »
update on mercator 34m salinity sep2017-feb2019. (scale same as previous post)

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #158 on: February 14, 2019, 11:25:02 PM »
update on ascat 2010-feb2019 for reference. (some gaps in data)
How to quantify mobility?

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #159 on: February 17, 2019, 11:11:12 AM »
An amateur attempt at visual identification of ice thickness using a comparison of ascat with an overlay of piomas thickness contours created using ImageJ edge detect for 2018.
Best efforts at scaling and alignment. Missing ascat days have been duplicated with nearest days. Poor data days remain for continuity. Off topic but posting here for reference.
thanks to wipneus, Zhang and Rothrock 2003 for piomas graphics and data

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #160 on: February 18, 2019, 12:42:02 AM »
An even rougher attempt at visualising whoi ITP107 . The charts are made using octave and I think they are accurate, though they need some tweaking, but scaling and alignment with ascat are by eye for now. Other ideas are in the pipeline.
It looks like itp107 is struggling a bit at the moment. Turbulence or lost its tether?
« Last Edit: February 18, 2019, 01:12:59 AM by uniquorn »

Sterks

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #161 on: February 18, 2019, 09:00:09 AM »
That is a great presentation, Uniquorn.
The Gyre beneath is surely strengthening thanks to the strong drift in the right direction this winter.

Bruce Steele

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #162 on: February 18, 2019, 10:35:49 AM »
Yes the temp /salinity contours are not working right now on itp 107 but sometimes the profilers come back. The gyre is certainly cranking compared to last year however. Thanks for all the work uniquorn !

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #163 on: February 18, 2019, 11:19:01 PM »
Thanks for the encouragement. My attention to detail is so poor that I didn't notice ITP109 was only reporting location till I ran the numbers, so here is ITP110. 103-105 data is different format so I may have a rethink about presentation before going further.
Any ideas how to accurately locate lat,long onto ascat?

Edit: Part of the motivation for putting these animations together was the large salinity drops in the profiles like those around day330 below. I had thought they were sensor problems but looking at the data like this I don't think so. Johnm33 suggested they were currents. That event does coincide with a rapid change in direction though.
Added the whoi locprof
« Last Edit: February 18, 2019, 11:49:47 PM by uniquorn »

johnm33

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #164 on: Today at 01:01:25 PM »
Thanks for these animations of the bouys motions, tracking them and looking for some surface signs of the salinity changes is exactly what I've been thinking about.
 Fwiw I've persuaded myself that these changes are happening from below, a sign of accelerating Atlantification. Currents into Barents are increasing[?] forced by tides[?] and slp, when these waters fall into the deep they are generating waves in the deeper layers, so if they fall off the shelf the waves caused are more or less parallel to lomonosov and arrive to wash up the shelf on the Canadian/Alaskan side, mixing the layers and causing the +/- parallel waves that wash back in the surface layer. As these wash back they're heading straight back towards the rotational axis and gain rotational energy almost as fast as they dissipate it churning the ice. If the waters wash into the  StAnna trough they force their way into Laptev generating deep waves which can travel all the way to Banks/Amundsen, they generate some backwash from the shelves giving some interference patterns more or less at the 'focal' point of the curved shelf structure and are interfered with by the parallel waves coming from the shelf. It may be that the bouys are being damaged by deep waves travelling in different directions causing stress in the lines beyond their design limits.
It'd be interesting to find some evidence of unexpected tide heights/lows at Sachs Harbour
With the full moon and the present low slp in Barents we're probably going to see another series of unusual waves in Beaufort in a few days time.