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uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #550 on: February 22, 2020, 01:24:36 AM »
this might help - ascat2010-2019 - temporary post as it is large, pls download
removed
« Last Edit: February 23, 2020, 07:33:10 PM by uniquorn »

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #551 on: February 22, 2020, 10:33:14 PM »
A rammb look at the large low concentration leads north of Greenland (north is left).
It's a shame itp116 profiler is dead.
https://go.nasa.gov/38RQqHM feb16-22  ctr

rammb update https://col.st/rAYkY  morbid fascination
« Last Edit: February 23, 2020, 10:35:25 PM by uniquorn »

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #552 on: February 24, 2020, 12:22:55 PM »
Kaleschke sic leads overlaid onto gmrt bathymetry, feb15-24.
Tech note - used contrast and unsharp mask to keep some greys

blumenkraft

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #553 on: February 24, 2020, 12:56:08 PM »
It's a shame itp116 profiler is dead.

 :'(

How confident can we be it's actually dead? I mean, is there a chance it's coming back again?
"Is a thin line 'tween heaven and here" - Bubbles

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #554 on: February 26, 2020, 02:01:16 PM »
If it 'comes back' from dead we can be confident it's alive ;)

Follow up on the large low concentration leads north of Greenland.
https://go.nasa.gov/32tcuWI , feb16-26, Kaleschke SIC leads inset. There are some differences as refreeze progresses.  ctr
Beginning to see a pattern in the wave like low concentration lines from previous years
« Last Edit: February 26, 2020, 02:06:57 PM by uniquorn »

blumenkraft

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #555 on: February 26, 2020, 02:42:03 PM »
If it 'comes back' from dead we can be confident it's alive ;)

That's not 'it's dead for good' as an answer. I guess i'm staying optimistic then. ;)
"Is a thin line 'tween heaven and here" - Bubbles

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #556 on: February 26, 2020, 09:05:22 PM »
ascat, north of greenland, day51-56, forward and back. Fram/FJL gap intake drift extends as far as the Lomonosov ridge (vertical line to left of pole hole), temporarily.
Ice slips more easily on higher salinity water? or more turbulence along the ridge?

added an avi of ascat, lomonosov ridge area, 2010-2019 for those few that would like to see if there is a similar previous occurrence since 2010. mp4 quality after conversion and compression not really good enough.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2020, 12:33:04 AM by uniquorn »

Glen Koehler

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #557 on: February 27, 2020, 07:38:45 PM »

Speaking of gyres ...
https://insideclimatenews.org/news/26022020/climate-oceans-weather-fishing-gyres-gulf-stream-sea%20level

   I suppose at ca. 1 km per year it won't happen anytime soon, but looking at the north end of that North Atlantic gyre loop in the map included with the article
https://insideclimatenews.org/sites/default/files/styles/colorbox_full/public/image_large/OceanGyres529px.png?itok=yoTQ6XPg
makes me wonder if someday it will loop over Greenland and go straight across the Arctic.  That would be "Atlantification" on steroids.


« Last Edit: February 27, 2020, 07:50:25 PM by Glen Koehler »

Glen Koehler

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #558 on: February 27, 2020, 07:55:19 PM »
Edited quote
Arctic ice sets speed limit for major ocean current
Quote
The Beaufort Gyre is an enormous, 600-mile-wide pool of swirling cold, fresh water in the Arctic Ocean, just north of Alaska and Canada. In the winter, this current is covered by a thick cap of ice. Each summer, as the ice melts away, the exposed gyre gathers up sea ice and river runoff, and draws it down to create a huge reservoir of frigid fresh water, equal to the volume of all the Great Lakes combined.

 ..... Scientists at MIT have now identified a key mechanism, which they call the "ice-ocean governor," that controls how fast the Beaufort Gyre spins and how much fresh water it stores.

"If this ice-ocean governor goes away, then we will end up with basically a new Arctic ocean," Marshall says......
 
The research paper
If the Beaufort Gyre can reach the Atlantic Ocean, the reverse is not so far-fetched.  I guess this is what comes with an increasingly "Equable climate" where the poles are no longer isolated from the midlatitudes.  Which does not bode well for ASI longevity.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2020, 11:59:56 PM by Glen Koehler »

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #559 on: February 29, 2020, 02:43:48 PM »
Beaufort ice drift relatively static at the moment.
update on Kaleschke SIC leads, feb22-29, ctr.
Anticyclone building up over the pole will likely disrupt the pattern a bit

uniquorn

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« Last Edit: March 05, 2020, 05:00:41 PM by uniquorn »

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #561 on: March 17, 2020, 09:14:08 PM »
update on the low concentration ice north of greenland using Kaleschke SIC leads. ctr
« Last Edit: March 17, 2020, 10:13:20 PM by uniquorn »

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #562 on: March 17, 2020, 10:31:34 PM »
must take a look a the beaufort again soon. Here is whoi itp114
https://www.whoi.edu/page.do?pid=165196

johnm33

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #563 on: April 10, 2020, 07:57:22 PM »
uniquorn your latest ascat showed ice lifting off the CAA and moving north, somewhat unusual so i took a look at Beaufort/Hycom which agrees and seems to show the whole ice pack moving in sync. but the strength gif shows enormous amounts of [?] internal wave activity which seem to be driven by surges in from the Pacific side, obviously i think tidal, but smashing any coherence the ice may have had on that side.

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #564 on: April 10, 2020, 11:11:57 PM »
Not that unusual but CAA coastal ice is probably weak this year. Lift off documented here
Comparing the hycom gif (model based) with amsr2-uhh and https://go.nasa.gov/3ebOD3l and looking at nullschool, I think the lift off is wind based.
Not sure how to analyse the ocean areas. sic-leads might help but that is currently unavailable. Rammb has potential for showing tidal movement in localised areas but how to show  the effect of internal waves?

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #565 on: April 10, 2020, 11:59:00 PM »
which seem to be driven by surges in from the Pacific side
Possibly all wind driven? Unusual that we have had almost zero easterlies along the alaskan beaufort coast. Nearly all cyclone and westerlies, building up the compressive strength on the CAA coast. Then southerlies arrive over the CAA causing lift off, pressure is released, then the ice 'bounces' back. Thickening by ridging, better than nothing, but not the same as fast ice.
On top of that though, much of the ice is moving eastward to the Fram, leaving unridged areas newly refrozen. Probably some up/downwelling going on. I don't know which.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2020, 12:07:49 AM by uniquorn »

johnm33

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #566 on: April 11, 2020, 01:14:20 AM »

'Internal Waves' On the left of the image waves at depth rotating/overturning aligned to their direction of movement [with energy gained by approaching the axis] create elongated 'hills' as they pass, but whether they are rolling towards [accelerating] or against the flow is opaque, but either way temporarily thinning the ice above them. Then two waves of similar power on the right again with ?semitones? . In between where the the colours transition through green much smaller but still huge waves that persist for thousands of miles, and somehow are more or less orthogonal to both systems which flank them. Almost as if the 'electricity' on the left caused orthogonal waves of magnetism to move right and that in turn induced more 'electricity' to flow far to the east. In some sense the wave has it's 'natural' speed but i wonder if the energy gained as the axis is approached travels closer to the speed of sound in water slowed only by it's spiralling motion.?
Yes agreed the lift off CAA and movement north was probably wind driven, indicating as you say weak ice, but elsewhere the winds have been too fickle to be a convincing factor.

binntho

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #567 on: April 12, 2020, 06:16:52 AM »
'Internal Waves' On the left of the image waves at depth rotating/overturning aligned to their direction of movement

I'm a bit unclear on this - are you claiming that waves are propagating large amounts of water in a rotating / overturning movement at depths under the ice, and still close enough to the ice to actually affect the surface sufficiently for the resulting patterns to be seen from space?

If so, have you considered the halocline? Is that still in place? Are there any buyos that show this wave motion?  The Arctic contains about 300 billion tons of water, what proportion of this do you think is engaged in rotating / overturning / surging waves big enough to leave patterns visible from space?
« Last Edit: April 12, 2020, 06:24:11 AM by binntho »
because a thing is eloquently expressed it should not be taken to be as necessarily true
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johnm33

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #568 on: April 12, 2020, 02:19:28 PM »
"claiming" well more a suggestion, funnily enough when i'd slept on it i woke up with the idea that the ones on the left were more likely tidal surges propagating across the shelf, they'd be about 10k wide and maybe .3/.5m high just enough to stretch the ice but not to open it up and that enhanced by the overturning, so picking up angular momentum as they approached the axis/pole, accelerating energy to the east and instead of a semi-tone an induced reverse wave?
The two major waves on the right though are less ambiguous, maybe they're what's showing up as off the scale intrusions at depth on bouys 104/5 t+s contours

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #569 on: April 12, 2020, 04:05:37 PM »
Unfortunately that was itp104's last profile on aug29 last year. It is still providing drift data though, which in itself is unusual.
itp105's profiler data stopped on the same day, and is also drifting east.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2020, 04:24:55 PM by uniquorn »

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #570 on: April 12, 2020, 04:31:07 PM »
While we are looking at whoi buoys. itp116 is just about to enter the fram strait, though south-easterlies are forecast that may hold it up for a while.

johnm33

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #571 on: April 15, 2020, 10:17:25 PM »
'unfortunately' thanks, even dumber than it looked, I actually spent some time oct/nov trying to figure out why.
itp94 does the salinity indicate A.W. ?

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #572 on: April 20, 2020, 09:17:04 PM »
Quote
itp94 does the salinity indicate A.W. ?
Maybe not since they have been passing over the deepest part of the basin. The data looks different to the Obuoys. Will look again. I'm more familiar with whoi itp's than Obuoys.


uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #573 on: April 20, 2020, 09:24:44 PM »
Mercator 318m salinity, Pacific side, sep2018-apr2019 (60fps, 6sec/yr)

atlantic side here

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #574 on: April 21, 2020, 12:15:58 PM »
Reposting from here so it doesn't get lost too quickly. I hope it is ok to reproduce the images here also.
Quote
For our discussion here we are interested about the formation of the leads, why and where they form:

Multiplex imaging with satellite cluster produces images of entire Arctic Ocean cloud-free during sunlight season, including the infrared and UV-scanners that identify sources or ships' heat or electric lights, whatever. On CV page 10 you can see how the continuous breakwater pulse propagates within the Arctic Ocean and weakens the sea ice from the estuary onwards. (The large image on the top.) Typically ultimate "C", penultimate "B", and antepenultimate "A" ice floes form from the Russian coast running their weakened seams perpendicularly to Canada where the ultimate "C" typically hits at the Western Last Sea Ice Area (Western - LIA) where the turning process causes opposite stress point, thus segregating the ultimate "C" and penultimate "B". There are two of these, but only one C/B is shown on my CV, both of them would be interest to this discussion.

There are couple other processes on the Arctic Ocean:

Page 8 The antepenultimate "A" facing the Atlantic runs on its own with the alternating zebra patterns of green and white on this image (result of breakwater waves or cells rolling on shallow sea).

The density differentials form the colours here as the river water from Russia moves along and rolls a bit like Swiss roll on its way to deep water near Fram Strait. The high density water is white as sea surface is lower than the ocean median ice surface (the median lines are highlighted on image for clarity), the low density river water is green due to it representing higher than the ocean median ice surface (due to its being less saline, it needs higher water column than saline water to keep ocean surface at equilibrium pressure).

The white colour forms over the dense water where ocean surface is lower than median and fills with drift snow. The green colour forms on the crest that is higher and without the drift snow that accumulates on troughs. The snow accumulation further amplifies the effect anchoring even more snow over the dense, saline rollers.

Because of this constant rolling of Swiss rolls between the ocean floor and its surface (sea ice), there is an overall current which has higher gravity potential and faster forward movement on surface, this then marks the boundary between antepenultimate "A", and penultimate "B" as the B flows slower than A.

These things have also changed over the years as ice in overall has pulverised and not been forming uniform films, but overall show the effect of North Asian rivers discharging onto the Arctic Ocean and forming weak points by supply of warmer water and its mixing and dragging heat out from warmer waters beneath - then maintaining a thinner ice along a narrow channel which presses against Canada (Western Last Sea Ice Area, by splitting the sea ice C/B and B/A, with B/A junction also running at different speed.

The differential movement on p. 8 is shown by 12 perpendicular secondary cracks (highlighted) on the main B/A crossing from Komsomoletski Island to Ellesmere Island.

Page 9 focuses on vortices or breakwater cells that fall into the deep channel, warm up aggressively and surface like cumulus cloud with the centre of pancake elevated with edges bending down and below median and filled by snow. These curving sea ice "spaghetti" edge formations are rare in comparison of the rectangular edge formations caused by breaking ice and re-freezing ice.

The rest of my Curriculum Vitae outside pages 8, 9, 10 are irrelevant to this forum.
https://www.academia.edu/5859691/Curriculum_Vitae_for_Exploration_and_Research
From the CV
Quote
The “zebra” pattern of green and white
stripes across the Arctic Ocean are a result of tiny sea ice surface level variations as the riparian water discharges from Siberia mix gradually with the saline sea water in the Arctic Ocean. The advancing breakwater currents create a complex web of turbulent flow currents. Those sea ice areas where the breakwater waves are cresting have only little drift snow accumulating, while the wave troughs have accumulated a much thicker snow blanket and appear, therefore, whiter

The Komsomoletski –Ellesmere Island River Ice “barrier” (a group of thirteen parallel leads in sea ice) used to form along the two sea ice currents that moved at different speeds. The sea ice that rests on breakwater current on the Kara Sea moves faster than the Arctic Basins' stiff multiyear circumpolar ice current. As the air temperatures on the North Pole are well below freezing, the two sea ice areas which move at different speeds appear as conjoined but because of their different speeds, the sea ice currents soon build up stresses perpendicular to the “barrier” line when the slow ice in the Arctic Basin cannot keep up with the pace of thinner and faster moving sea ice found on the Kara Sea

The computer-processed Arctic Ocean sea ice images where the cloud cover has been removed shows further large scale structures. Some of these have rectangular shapes while others have rounded shapes.
 It is well known from diving expeditions that there is a plenty of light under the sea ice in the Arctic Ocean and the sea ice does not completely block the sunlight. What I have done is to search for this rebound radiation, light which is coming from beneath the sea ice. Where the sea ice cover is over one year old the sea ice appears whiter, whereas the previous winter’s sea ice appears much darker as it is thinner.
 The curved ice boundaries in the Arctic Ocean’s ice, the “spaghetti” patterns and the elevated “pancakes” both form when the breakwater waves fall off the shallow continental shelf into a deepwater trench near the North Pole. The breakwater sinks in a warm and saline surroundings and curls into vertical eddies. These initially travel southwards when they start sinking, but once they have sunk deep enough their movement reverses to northward. Due to the lack of salinity, the warmed eddies begin a rapid ascent. Once such a warmed-up vertical breakwater eddy hits the ocean’s surface it forms a pancake-like elevated region which is visible on the sea ice. The above processes represent only the Atlantic end of the Arctic Ocean and there are different processes occurring on the rear end of the Arctic Ocean due to the stiff and much thicker multi year ice

The rear end of the Arctic Ocean as seen in this computer-processed multicolor image of the Laptev Sea is predominantly made of thick multi-year sea ice. The warm riparian discharges travel towards the Arctic Basin and are releasing heat on their way from the river estuaries. The spring time warm riparian discharges appear tunneling under the sea ice and thinning it. Due to the prevailing sea currents such as the Beaufort Gyre, the sea ice breaks along the sections of thinned sea ice where long leads are formed

Once a lead has been triggered in the Arctic Ocean’s ice by a flow of the warm river water, the splitting of sea ice progresses unstopped like a glass split.
 The leads that form from the east Russian rivers rapidly split the sea ice across the ocean all the way to Canada where the unhindered Arctic Ocean’s ice cover finally ends due to the topographic constraints laid down by the Canada’s Nunavut Archipelago which divides the ocean to numerous sounds.

 These are just a selection of my work at the Frozen Isthmuses’ Protection Campaign to understand and protect the Arctic Ocean’s ice better.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2020, 09:28:58 PM by uniquorn »

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #575 on: April 21, 2020, 11:05:37 PM »
itp94 does the salinity indicate A.W. ?
Yes. I think it does. Obuoy 2019O1 is significantly redder than hycom SSS on apr1 at ~85N

time                               Lat         Lon   salinity_10m   20m     50m     75m    salinity_100m
2020-04-01T00:00:00   84.941   16.531       34.07   34.07   34.08   34.27   34.32



%ITP 94, profile 327: year day longitude(E+) latitude(N+) ndepths
2020  111.23177    15.4621  84.6432  377
%year day pressure(dbar) temperature(C) salinity oxygen(umol/kg) turbidity(10e-4/m s/r) chlorophyll(ug/l) cdom(ppb) par(V)
2020  111.23222    8   -1.8679   34.1219    8.7613    0.7493    0.0803    2.4300    0.8088
2020  111.23228   10   -1.8678   34.1220    8.7664    0.7493    0.0657    2.5200    0.7846
2020  111.23236   12   -1.8678   34.1219    8.7726    0.7493    0.0803    2.3850    0.7410
2020  111.23247   14   -1.8678   34.1220    8.7826    0.7738    0.0621    2.3400    0.6976
2020  111.23258   16   -1.8681   34.1217    8.7913    0.7493    0.0766    2.2950    0.6541
2020  111.23269   18   -1.8682   34.1217    8.7915    0.7575    0.0657    2.4750    0.5883
2020  111.23278   20   -1.8681   34.1217    8.7901    0.7331    0.0657    2.4300    0.5458
2020  111.23286   22   -1.8681   34.1217    8.7886    0.7656    0.0803    2.3850    0.5060
2020  111.23297   24   -1.8681   34.1217    8.7961    0.7575    0.0657    2.4750    0.4527
2020  111.23306   26   -1.8679   34.1217    8.8065    0.7493    0.0803    2.4300    0.4222
2020  111.23314   28   -1.8681   34.1219    8.7968    0.7575    0.0766    2.4300    0.3691
2020  111.23322   30   -1.8679   34.1217    8.8199    0.7493    0.0730    2.6100    0.3531
2020  111.23330   32   -1.8679   34.1219    8.8174    0.7901    0.0657    2.4300    0.3272
2020  111.23339   34   -1.8679   34.1220    8.8050    0.7493    0.0876    2.5200    0.2615
2020  111.23347   36   -1.8678   34.1220    8.8229    0.7656    0.0693    2.4300    0.2394
2020  111.23358   38   -1.8677   34.1219    8.8267    0.7656    0.0803    2.5650    0.1879
2020  111.23367   40   -1.8677   34.1219    8.8108    0.7493    0.0584    2.5200    0.1712
2020  111.23374   42   -1.8676   34.1219    8.8324    0.7493    0.0766    2.4300    0.1188
2020  111.23383   44   -1.8676   34.1219    8.8309    0.7819    0.0949    2.3400    0.0913
2020  111.23392   46   -1.8675   34.1218    8.8377    0.7412    0.0693    2.3850    0.0821
2020  111.23402   48   -1.8674   34.1220    8.8393    0.7738    0.0766    2.4300    0.0389
2020  111.23411   50   -1.8673   34.1221    8.8492    0.7493    0.0657    2.3400    0.0066
2020  111.23420   52   -1.8671   34.1221    8.8337    0.7656    0.0876    2.4300    0.0021
2020  111.23427   54   -1.8671   34.1225    8.8527    0.7819    0.0657    2.5200    0.0037
2020  111.23436   56   -1.8668   34.1229    8.8511    0.7656    0.0693    2.5200    0.0039
2020  111.23447   58   -1.8664   34.1239    8.8455    0.7575    0.0730    2.5650    0.0039
2020  111.23455   60   -1.8652   34.1277    8.8478    0.7493    0.0730    2.3400    0.0027
2020  111.23464   62   -1.8626   34.1327    8.8575    0.7575    0.0766    2.3850    0.0031
2020  111.23472   64   -1.8561   34.1459    8.8668    0.7493    0.0657    2.4300    0.0027
2020  111.23480   66   -1.8426   34.1546    8.8804    0.7493    0.0657    2.3400    0.0050
2020  111.23488   68   -1.8262   34.1596    8.8738    0.7493    0.0803    2.3400    0.0049
2020  111.23497   70   -1.7971   34.1726    8.8561    0.7412    0.0657    2.3850    0.0033
2020  111.23508   72   -1.7561   34.1918    8.8527    0.7331    0.0693    2.3400    0.0031
2020  111.23516   74   -1.6809   34.2265    8.8310    0.7819    0.0657    2.0700    0.0024
2020  111.23525   76   -1.6183   34.2573    8.8171    0.7493    0.0657    2.2500    0.0042
2020  111.23534   78   -1.5876   34.2789    8.8020    0.7493    0.0584    2.0700    0.0037
2020  111.23541   80   -1.5753   34.2892    8.7717    0.7656    0.0548    2.2050    0.0026
2020  111.23553   82   -1.5664   34.2976    8.7516    0.8878    0.0657    2.1600    0.0032
2020  111.23561   84   -1.5591   34.3063    8.7267    0.7331    0.0438    2.1600    0.0042
2020  111.23569   86   -1.5549   34.3114    8.7032    0.7412    0.0584    2.0250    0.0027
2020  111.23578   88   -1.5511   34.3167    8.6841    0.7168    0.0657    2.0700    0.0022
2020  111.23586   90   -1.5428   34.3249    8.6676    0.7331    0.0548    2.0250    0.0033
2020  111.23594   92   -1.5402   34.3306    8.6527    0.7168    0.0511    1.9800    0.0046
2020  111.23602   94   -1.5388   34.3357    8.6464    0.7575    0.0474    1.8900    0.0049
2020  111.23614   96   -1.5326   34.3395    8.6215    0.7656    0.0548    1.9800    0.0048
2020  111.23622   98   -1.5275   34.3424    8.6197    0.7331    0.0511    1.9800    0.0022
2020  111.23630  100   -1.5286   34.3453    8.6101    0.7493    0.0474    1.9350    0.0046
« Last Edit: April 21, 2020, 11:30:04 PM by uniquorn »

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #576 on: April 21, 2020, 11:52:10 PM »
Meanwhile in the Beaufort, whoi itp114 is also experiencing a higher salinity event. Temperature also looks higher but it's at 44m depth, +1.28C. Microcat2 is at 6m depth.

johnm33

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #577 on: April 22, 2020, 10:32:54 AM »
Looking at Beaufort strength there appears to be some surface[?] turbulence penetrating from the north, taken with the local cracks on Worldview, is this what a freezing event looks like? Dense brine dropping and causing upward mixing of warmer layers. Where exactly was it on 430 and 452 for instance and does this explain the black/white anomolies?

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #578 on: April 22, 2020, 12:06:16 PM »
Where was it? Download the zip file and take a look.

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #579 on: May 08, 2020, 09:31:07 PM »
noted for the smos reference

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #580 on: May 08, 2020, 10:42:07 PM »
looking at some high pressure passing over Fram to Laptev.
Default ascat day104-124, medium/heavy contrast, A-team interferometry (high volume users only)

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #581 on: May 09, 2020, 12:08:58 AM »
maybe I cropped too close

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #582 on: May 11, 2020, 10:16:30 PM »
Laptev ice over bathymetry, https://go.nasa.gov/3cnAUFb, may11. click to run
Similar cause to the FJL/Svalbard side of the basin perhaps.
added a short rammb, nothing conclusive.  ctr
« Last Edit: May 11, 2020, 11:40:50 PM by uniquorn »

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #583 on: May 12, 2020, 08:43:35 PM »
Surprised by the amount of drift difference when looking at the mosaic buoys I thought I'd check using ascat interferometry.
Areas which don't move much are grey, those that move more are brightly coloured. Try to ignore the open water (unless it means something to you)

Quote
Take 4 filmstrips of daily ascats and cut the first image off the second strip, the first 2 images off the 3rd strip and the first 3 images off the 4th strip.
Then lie the the first and second strips on top of each other from the left and save the difference as a new film strip. Call it the 1day difference strip. (In this case we use gimp grain extract)
Do the same to the first and third strips. Call the new strip 2day difference strip.
Then do the first and 4th strip to get the 3day difference strip.
Now we want to overlap all 3 difference strips so we compose a new strip by making each of the 3 strips red, green and blue and combining them into a colour image.
Areas which don't move much will combine the 3 colours to grey, those that move more will be more brightly coloured depending on the daily differences.

Ascat shows a lot of movement over open water, this can be masked out using an amsr2 mask but that takes longer.

2019 day280 to 2020 day132 most of the freezing and melting season up to now
7.5MB
Please be aware that swath rotation artifacts are amplified using this method
« Last Edit: May 13, 2020, 12:46:31 PM by uniquorn »

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #584 on: May 13, 2020, 09:49:19 PM »
following up on post582 above, here is a heavy contrast animation of ice over the laptev side of the Nansen Basin shelf. https://go.nasa.gov/2y4eVo4, may4-13

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #585 on: May 16, 2020, 10:22:24 PM »
mercator sea surface height, jan1-may15
Remembering that bering strait depth is max ~53m so volume is not huge.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2020, 10:29:44 PM by uniquorn »

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #586 on: May 17, 2020, 12:17:21 AM »
following up on post 539, not sure about eckman pumping but there is good evidence of eddies shown in thin ice in the barents at the moment, https://col.st/tvlWA

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #587 on: May 17, 2020, 03:02:32 PM »
mercator current, 34m depth, jan1-may16
scale is m/s

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #588 on: May 18, 2020, 11:33:36 PM »
following up again on laptev/nansen shelf, https://go.nasa.gov/36blX6R may11-18. Possible second low concentration line follows the first. Hint of previoius line. click to run
mercator salinity 34m, jan1-may17
forgot scale
« Last Edit: May 18, 2020, 11:47:06 PM by uniquorn »

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #589 on: May 19, 2020, 11:18:02 AM »
itp94 gives some indication that there may be a [+/- 3 day resonance] standing wave in the depths of Amundsen, it shows more strongly in the occasional alternative T+S contours image 
I'm guessing that these waves, if that's what we're seeing, would bounce back off the shelves giving us cross waves and 'point' surface melt where they cross close to 900.
 These are from the far end of the basin and it may be that the waves are moving in opposite directions through one another?

uniquorn

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #590 on: May 19, 2020, 04:32:46 PM »
artifact of the profiler only descending to full depth of 800m every 2? days, probably to extend battery life (or maybe they are more interested in the top 200m for this expedition).
There are some interesting temperature layers there below 200m though.

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #591 on: May 24, 2020, 07:30:37 AM »
We have water temperature readings from microcat data for ITP 113 and 114 at 5 and 6 meters as well as Sami water temperature data at 6 meters for ITP 117 and 118 . They are all in the Beaufort and every buoy showed water temperature increases at 5-6 meters over the last ten days.
 

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #592 on: May 24, 2020, 10:51:27 AM »
Thanks Bruce Steele. 3 of them may be affected by proximity to the shelf or possible current into Mclure Strait.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2020, 11:04:05 AM by uniquorn »

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #593 on: May 31, 2020, 07:11:30 PM »
Current or eddies in the Kara Sea. amsr2-uhh, may10-30

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #594 on: June 03, 2020, 10:09:29 PM »
We have water temperature readings from microcat data for ITP 113 and 114 at 5 and 6 meters as well as Sami water temperature data at 6 meters for ITP 117 and 118 . They are all in the Beaufort and every buoy showed water temperature increases at 5-6 meters over the last ten days.
 
You may be onto something Bruce. whoi itp113 microcats, 5m and 6m. 0.1degC temperature spike. Smaller spike on itp114.

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #595 on: June 03, 2020, 10:50:19 PM »
Uniquorn, We have microcat data from ITP Whoi 107 from last year. Scale is different but it looks like the freshwater lens in the Beaufort is  catching heat from insolation . Those buoys nearer center of gyre show largest heat gains.

https://www.whoi.edu/page.do?pid=165217

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #596 on: June 04, 2020, 12:02:51 AM »
Here is a new paper on PAR and how melt season and light availability affect algae under the ice.
Open access
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.00183/full

“The depth under the sea ice experiencing spatial variability in light levels due to the influence of surface heterogeneity in snow, white ice and melt pond distributions increased from 7 ± 4 to 20 ± 6 m over our study. Phytoplankton drifting in under-ice surface waters were thus exposed to variations in PAR availability of up to 43%, highlighting the importance to account for spatial heterogeneity in light transmission through melting sea ice.”
« Last Edit: June 04, 2020, 12:08:26 AM by Bruce Steele »

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #597 on: June 04, 2020, 09:44:30 PM »
"Current or eddies" Looks like both, not sure that would've been picked up elsewhere, maybe it's a new phenomenon, certainly seems to indicate a flood of Atl. water[based on it's inertia eastward] rushing down St. Anna, may be pushing it but perhaps the disturbance above above Amundsen towards Lomonosov, the recent surface melt, was caused by this. It appears to be recurring so maybe there'll be a repeat.

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #598 on: June 07, 2020, 03:10:19 PM »
Current and/or eddies continue. Looks amazing on worldview today.
uni-hamburg amsr2-uhh concentration, st anna trough, may10-jun6.
worldview, terra modis, jun7.   https://go.nasa.gov/3gYCyjo

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Re: Arctic Ocean salinity, temperature and waves
« Reply #599 on: June 10, 2020, 05:37:16 PM »
Looks huge

my interpretation is eddies forced by the Atl. current accelerating down St. Anna, eddies and counter eddies caught up in the trough by Gakel so moving both east and west, both reaching the surface but eastbound with more energy. Not sure that waves reflected by Lomonosov have begun to interfere yet but Bremen amsr2 will lighten up when that happens. Surge of incoming water causing acceleration towards Fram of the layer @75m deep not steadied by contact with ice, stretching the layer above it and opening up the ice. This will also push tidal Atl. water towards CAA and act to force tidal surges in Greenland/Norwegian seas to either short circuit around Iceland or climb onto Barentz shelf to continue the assault.   
What are those two wave forms on the other side? no trace of them elsewhere.