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Sebastian Jones

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Antarctic Expeditions
« on: November 03, 2018, 12:44:16 AM »
A Dutch couple are about (Nov 28th 2018) to embark on a trip to the South Pole in a 3D printed vehicle powered entirely by solar panels. It is not clear why they did not try a shake down cruise in a more hospitable environment such as the Sahara Desert...

charles_oil

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Re: Antarctic Expeditions
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2018, 03:26:20 PM »
Link:
https://www.clean2antarctica.nl/en/explore/lets-do-something-crazy

Quite right - cant see any sign of testing etc - they Liesbeth and Edwin ter Velde. should be there now in the Solar Voyager.

Have signed up so may get some updates......


charles_oil

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Re: Antarctic Expeditions
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2018, 01:36:42 PM »
Not sure of progress - after a storm delay they have got moving again - this posted on Facebook 6 hrs ago (ca. 6am GMT 12/12/18).


Will we make it to the South Pole in time? After being held up by the weather, the sun has been shining on the plateau. We've started moving again, although we're far behind our schedule. We're trying and it could still be possible, but whether we make it to the pole or not doesn't really matter, because look where we're driving! We've already made it.
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[/size]See  [/color][/size]https://www.facebook.com/clean2antarctica[/color]

Jim Hunt

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Re: Antarctic Expeditions
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2019, 05:18:35 PM »
According to the BBC:

Quote
A former Royal Marine who has completed a 745-mile (1,200km) solo trek to the South Pole has described the conditions as "absolutely horrendous".

Baz Gray, 45, from Buckland Monochorum, Devon, said unusually heavy snow had made the middle section the toughest period of his life.

He had to eat 10,000 calories each day, covering an average of 19 miles (31km) while dragging an 85kg (187lbs) sled.

Mr Gray arrived at the South Pole at 19:00 GMT on Sunday after 39 days.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-46780829

No 3D printing necessary, but Baz did fly rather than walk away from the South Pole!

Quote
The expedition was a practice run for a record-attempting solo trip across the whole of Antarctica planned for 2019.
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein

Andreas T

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Re: Antarctic Expeditions
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2019, 10:15:12 PM »
here is a blog by one of the scientists on the way to Thwaites glacier:
https://thwaitesglacier.org/blog/snow-ice-ice-4

The Polarstern has left Punta Arenas and is heading for the Wedell sea
https://www.awi.de/en/expedition/ships/polarstern.html

Andreas T

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Re: Antarctic Expeditions
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2019, 12:11:34 PM »
Tasha Snow writes  about water temperature measurements, it obviously will take some time until those come out but getting access  below the ice with the AUV is really promising.
https://thwaitesglacier.org/blog
Since then the Nathaniel B Palmer has gone to Rothera station it seems from sailwx
https://www.sailwx.info/shiptrack/shipposition.phtml?call=WBP3210


solartim27

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Re: Antarctic Expeditions
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2019, 04:12:47 PM »
There was a medical emergency on the Palmer, requiring them to stop research. 
https://twitter.com/NSF_OPP/status/1096545610138898432?s=19
FNORD

Andreas T

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Re: Antarctic Expeditions
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2019, 08:30:19 PM »
Thanks for that info, they are heading west again now.

Andreas T

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Re: Antarctic Expeditions
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2019, 02:06:17 AM »
The N B Palmer is back off Pine island Glacier according to sailwx.
a post from the 24th is probably about activities before the detour to Rothera.
https://thwaitesglacieroffshoreresearch.org/news/2019/2/24/island-days-part-ii-tarsan-partners-with-the-natives-seals

but contains a lot of interesting information about the research.

Andreas T

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Re: Antarctic Expeditions
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2019, 10:47:09 PM »
A new entry on the THOR cruise news about their trip to Rothera with many nice photos:
https://thwaitesglacieroffshoreresearch.org/news/

Andreas T

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Re: Antarctic Expeditions
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2019, 03:02:50 PM »
A new post is up  on https://thwaitesglacieroffshoreresearch.org/news/2019/3/8/life-on-the-research-icebreaker-nathaniel-b-palmer
which has short clips on the ice edge of Thwaites Glacier Ice shelf (thats what the caption says) It would be nice to have more detail on the location of these images but nice to see what the white bits we see in the satellite images look close up.
Tasha Snow also has a new post up, interesting background to the research going on
https://thwaitesglacier.org/blog/snow-ice-geology-spoon-7
The NBP has moved on to the PIG according to sailwx by the way
https://www.sailwx.info/shiptrack/shipposition.phtml?call=WBP3210
« Last Edit: March 09, 2019, 03:28:35 PM by Andreas T »

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Antarctic Expeditions
« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2019, 04:56:11 PM »
Thanks, Andreas for those updates. Very much appreciated.

Andreas T

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Re: Antarctic Expeditions
« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2019, 06:24:47 PM »
The Nathaniel B Palmer is on its way back now it seems but there is another report on the blog
https://thwaitesglacier.org/blog/snow-ice-synergizing-science-9
another report with some more detail is here
https://thwaitesglacieroffshoreresearch.org/news/2019/3/12/thwaites-glacier-there-and-gone

bligh8

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Re: Antarctic Expeditions
« Reply #13 on: July 14, 2019, 02:18:26 PM »
Biostabilization of sewage sludge in the Antarctic
Carlos Banchón (a1), Tamara Borodulina (a1), Paola Posligua (a2) (a3) (a4) and Miguel Gualoto (a2) (a3)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954102019000221
Published online by Cambridge University Press: 10 June 2019

Extract
Antarctica is no longer a pristine environment due to atmospheric pollution, fuel spills, inadequate waste management and wastewater discharges from anthropogenic activities (Harris 1998, Stark et al. 2015). Approximately 37% of the permanent stations and 69% of the summer stations lack any form of sewage treatment (Gröndahl et al. 2009). The characteristics of wastewater from stations are also of concern because they are a complex mix of contaminants containing human waste, cosmetics, viruses, dyes, detergents, medications, chemicals from laboratories and even microplastics (Bhardwaj et al. 2018). In Antarctica, treatment plants discharge treated water into the sea and then sludge is packed and sealed into drums for later shipment to Chile. Nevertheless, sewage sludge (c. 59–88% organic matter) could become a biosolid instead of being a waste if correctly stabilized. The Ecuadorian Antarctic station ‘Pedro Vicente Maldonado’ produced c. 200 kg of sewage sludge during expeditions in 2017 and 2018. Thus, the aim of the present study was to biostabilize sewage sludge using two methods (one thermal and one biological) at the Ecuadorian Antarctic station. As a result, the stabilization of sewage sludge produced a biosolid that was easier and more cost effective to transport, avoiding odour problems.

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/antarctic-science/article/biostabilization-of-sewage-sludge-in-the-antarctic/FD4C4452CCC0F9EFE1CBF59225F41635