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Author Topic: Archaeology/Paleontology news  (Read 337 times)

Pmt111500

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Archaeology/Paleontology news
« on: November 26, 2018, 07:21:47 AM »
This thread may be used to inform forumites of interesting archeology/paleontology news, lets keep the posts short and always link to a source, please.
I'm opening the thread with a local find. The site is under 10 km from my place.
Part of the burial ground of the earliest christian church yet found in Finland has been found, and the burial of a 13th century women has been excavated. No written records of this site exist. Among finds are remnants of cloth used during the time, as of yet the colors used are unknown, samples of the cloths are sent to Belgian laboratory for color analysis. Parts of socks and a skirt (apparently also a cape) have been identified.
 https://www.is.fi/tiede/art-2000005911736.html
« Last Edit: November 26, 2018, 07:59:28 AM by Pmt111500 »
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Pmt111500

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Re: Archaeology/Paleontology news
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2018, 09:24:58 AM »
1400s AD fisherman found probably drowned in then Thames mudflats, wearing tigh high boots: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-46444769
« Last Edit: December 09, 2018, 11:08:19 AM by Pmt111500 »
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kassy

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Re: Archaeology/Paleontology news
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2018, 09:45:48 PM »
Meanwhile in Denmark...

Oldest ever traces of the plague found in Falköping

In a 5,000 year old grave outside Falköping, scientists have found the oldest traces of the plague bacterium's DNA in the world.

"The discovery of such an early variant of the bacterium in Falköping was totally unexpected since previous findings pointed to Yersinia pestis as having originated in Asia.

The find in Falköping also means that the researchers may have solved another mystery. It was only recently discovered that people in different regions of Eurasia were all infected with the plague during the Bronze Age.

t was by analysing 'molecular clock' data that the researchers discovered that different strains of the plague bacterium spread very rapidly in Eurasia between 5,000 and 6,000 years ago. This matches exactly a period in South-East Europe when the first large population densities arose but also collapsed. It was also at this time that many technological breakthroughs occurred such as the wheel, the use of draught animals, and metallurgy – breakthroughs that facilitated long-distance trade, for example.

For full details see
https://phys.org/news/2018-12-oldest-plague-falkping.html

or this
https://www.heritagedaily.com/2018/12/an-ancient-strain-of-plague-may-have-led-to-the-decline-of-neolithic-europeans/122286


kassy

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Re: Archaeology/Paleontology news
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2018, 02:58:30 PM »
Not archaeology per se if if this pans out it will be useful for the field so i am smuggling it in here:

Chinese cave holds carbon dating ‘Holy Grail’

Stalagmites in a Chinese cave have given scientists all they need to reconstruct the historical record of atmospheric radiocarbon (carbon-14) back to the carbon dating limit of around 54,000 years ago.

...

 carbon dating requires calibrating because levels of carbon-14 in the atmosphere vary from year to year. Tree ring data provides a good gauge for carbon dating because their growth reflects their yearly uptake of atmospheric carbon-14. But tree ring data only goes back around 13,000 years.

...
Hai Cheng at Xi’an Jiaotong University, China, and colleagues in the US previously discovered that a stalagmite in Hulu Cave in China showed unusually low and stable amounts of dead carbon that allowed for accurate carbon-14 calibration between around 27,000 and 10,500 years ago. Now the team have studied two older stalagmites in the cave to help take carbon dating to its limit.

https://www.chemistryworld.com/news/chinese-cave-holds-carbon-dating-holy-grail/3009899.article