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How many people can fit in a space dinghy?

Less than a thousand
9 (31%)
From a thousand to a million
1 (3.4%)
Several million
2 (6.9%)
Several billion
2 (6.9%)
I do not know
8 (27.6%)
Null
7 (24.1%)

Total Members Voted: 28

Author Topic: Space colonization  (Read 22770 times)

Sigmetnow

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Re: Space colonization
« Reply #300 on: November 23, 2019, 02:13:07 PM »
Findings like this will accelerate development of artificial gravity for prolonged space flight (by spinning the ships).

An Alarming Discovery in an Astronaut’s Bloodstream
A study has turned up a newly found side effect of human spaceflight: low bloodflow in the jugular vein resulting in the blood clotting there.
Quote
Seeing stagnant blood flow in this kind of vein is rare, she says; the condition usually occurs in the legs, such as when people sit still for hours on a plane. The finding was concerning. Stagnant blood, whether it’s in the neck or in the legs, can clot. Blood clots can dissolve on their own or with the help of anticoagulants, but the blockages can also cause serious problems, such as lung damage.
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/11/astronaut-blood-clot/602380/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Space colonization
« Reply #301 on: November 25, 2019, 09:16:48 PM »
We’re going to move to Mars and it will change life on Earth forever
Quote
The technology developed to achieve the monumental feat of landing and settling on Mars will also be used to improve life back on our own planet – and there’s a precedent for this because NASA’s Apollo missions led to the creation of several major technologies which are still in general use today.

…‘One of the most exciting things about working on this project was realising how much of the technology developed for a mission to Mars will have very relevant Earth applications.
‘The Martian habitats will have to generate zero waste and use low energy, high yield farming systems, for instance.
‘This feels very pressing given our own situation on Earth.’



We’re a long way off building a Martian habitat, but Nasa has already launched a bid to work out how to construct basic buildings on the Red Planet. It recently named the winner of a competition called the 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge, which asked companies to devise a robotic system capable of building structures without human intervention.  The $500,000 top prize went to New York-based AI SpaceFactory, which devised a way of using the Martian ‘regolith’ to print structures whilst in residency at The Autodesk Technology Center in Boston. Regolith is the material covering a planet and, on Mars, contains the volcanic rock basalt.

AI SpaceFactory combined basalt with a biopolymer called PLA that’s made from a plant extract found in corn or sugar cane. This allowed them to produce a material that is stronger than concrete and does not require vast quantities of water – a substance in short supply on Mars.

It’s already demonstrated the technique of printing out structures using Martian regolith during the Nasa competition and is working on its first buildings on Earth – with a small structure in upstate New York expected to be be opened to visitors by March next year.

Best of all, its innovative basalt fibre material is recyclable, meaning old buildings can be pulled down and the materials used again.

He’s also excited about the first Earth development built using the technique, which will be called Tera. ‘It’s the literal transformation of space technology for Earth applications,’ Malott added. ‘We were printing in the woods recently and it was so quiet you could hear the crickets. ...
https://metro.co.uk/2019/11/25/going-move-mars-will-change-life-earth-forever-10913234/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Space colonization
« Reply #302 on: November 26, 2019, 02:37:13 PM »
SpaceX Falcon 9 rideshare will test the tools needed to build space stations in orbit
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“As a member of the Outpost program team, Maxar will develop a new articulating robotic arm with a friction milling end-effector for this mission. This friction milling will use high rotations per minute melting our metal material in such a way that a cut is made, yet we anticipate avoiding generating a single piece of orbital debris.

The mission is targeting a Q4 2020 dedicated rideshare mission, will fly on an ESPA ring, and will activate after the deployment of all other secondary payloads is complete. As our mission commences, we will have 30 minutes to one hour to complete the cutting of three metal pieces that are representative of various vehicle upper stages, including the Centaur 3. Nanoracks plans to downlink photos and videos of the friction milling and cutting.”
https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-falcon-9-rideshare-space-stations-test/


Nanoracks Books CubeSat Rideshare and Habitat Building Demonstration in Single SpaceX Falcon 9 Launch
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Recently, Nanoracks announced the Company’s first in-space Outpost demonstration mission in a letter from CEO Jeffrey Manber. Nanoracks, in collaboration with Maxar, will be building and operating a self-contained hosted payload platform that will demonstrate the robotic cutting of second stage representative tank material on-orbit. This test will be the first of its kind to demonstrate the future ability to convert spent upper stages in orbit into commercial habitats – a long-term goal of Nanoracks. ...
http://nanoracks.com/rideshare-habitat-building-demonstration/


Nanoracks Announces In-Space Outpost Demonstration
http://nanoracks.com/in-space-outpost-demonstration/
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Space colonization
« Reply #303 on: December 05, 2019, 07:06:49 PM »
Successful Falcon 9 launch and Cargo Dragon deployed to orbit just a few minutes ago!  Expected to reach the Space Station just after 5am Eastern US Time Sunday morning (11am UTC).

SpaceX cargo mission combines mighty mice, fires and beer research – Spaceflight Now
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/12/03/spacex-cargo-mission-combines-mighty-mice-fires-and-beer/

SpaceX CRS-19 Research Overview: Mighty Mice in Space
On SpaceX CRS-19, the Jackson Laboratory is sending to station female mice, including a few that lack the gene for producing myostatin, a growth factor that normally acts to limit muscle growth in both mice and humans. Microgravity induces rapid muscle and bone loss, providing accelerated models of disease for research aimed at improving therapeutics for patients on Earth.

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Sigmetnow

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Re: Space colonization
« Reply #304 on: Today at 04:18:43 AM »
Scientists Are Contemplating a 1,000-Year Space Mission to Save Humanity
Relocating the human race to a more hospitable planet would mean that multiple generations would be born in-transit
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Even by generous estimates, traveling one light year in a vessel large enough to transport humans will take centuries; reaching a planet in the range of Proxima b would take a thousand years or more.

This means that no one cohort of crew members would be able to survive the journey from start to finish, so those on the craft for the launch would have to pass on the torch to the next generation, and the next, and the next, and the next.

While it might sound like science fiction, a small network of researchers is tackling the problem of multi-generation space travel in a serious way. “There’s no principal obstacle from a physics perspective,” Andreas Hein, executive director of the nonprofit Initiative for Interstellar Studies — an education and research institute focused on expediting travel to other stars — tells me in a call from Paris. “We know that people can live in isolated areas, like islands, for hundreds or thousands of years; we know that in principle people can live in an artificial ecosystem like Biosphere2. It’s a question of scaling things up. There are a lot of challenges, but no fundamental principle of physics is violated.”

As one might expect from such an undertaking, the difficulties are many and broad, spanning not just physics but biology, sociology, engineering, and more. They include conundrums like artificial gravity, hibernation, life support systems, propulsion, navigation, and many problems that are nowhere near to being solved. But even if we never make it to Proxima b, in the process of exploring the question of how to escape Earth, some of the scientists involved in the work may stumble upon solutions for surviving on our planet, as resources like energy and water become increasingly scarce. ...
https://onezero.medium.com/scientists-are-contemplating-a-1-000-year-space-mission-to-save-humanity-70882a0d6e47
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.