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crandles

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3450 on: March 02, 2019, 04:10:07 PM »
Guess 8 year old is a bit new for 'ageing PV systems'. Anyway, never had to do anything if that is any use.

Occassionally check meter readings with neighbour who had system installed at about same time.

Ken Feldman

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3451 on: March 03, 2019, 12:46:59 AM »
When a company (or community organization) buy electricity from a solar or wind provider under a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA), they are purchasing a certain amount of energy at a set price.  Their money goes directly to the wind or solar provider, who can then invest that money in new wind or solar projects.

In most cases, the PPA specifies which solar or wind farm the electricity is coming from.  If that farm doesn't have the capacity to supply the electricity, the owner of the renewable farm either has to expand it to increase the capacity or the deal isn't made.

In Australia, that's the point of the Government accreditation of the solar or wind farms.  In the US, there are production tax credits involved.

Ken Feldman

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3452 on: March 03, 2019, 12:55:21 AM »
Sol Systems CEO discusses current trends in US demand for solar power, improvements in the technology and costs:

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/a-solar-ceos-2019-forecast#gs.7fNt7nUl

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In 2018, New Jersey passed a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) with a goal of 50 percent renewables by 2030, and the governor has stated his goal for reaching 100 percent renewable energy by 2050. The District of Columbia passed a 50 percent renewable energy goal by 2032. In September 2018, the California state legislature passed SB 100, which requires the state to generate 100% percent of electricity from carbon-free sources, with a 60 percent renewable portfolio standard built in.

New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham signed an executive order in January 2019 that commits the state to reduce carbon emissions by at least 45 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. Governors in Maine, New York, Colorado and Illinois have all set 100 percent targets for renewable energy.

These policies have broad and significant impacts on solar regionally, since RPS legislation generally enables both in-state and out-of-state development. Climate change has become one of the most important issues for younger generations, as it should be. These generations are actively changing the prioritization of policy across the political divide. Given the recent Democratic takeovers of six state legislative houses, as well as six governorships, expect additional legislative support for renewables in 2019.

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As we anticipated, corporate customers continue to move into direct renewable energy procurement based on corporate sustainability goals and cost savings. In 2018, there were 75 new corporate renewable deals, supporting almost 7 gigawatts of new projects. This is twice as much as 2015, the former record year. Expect this trend to continue in 2019, especially in the PJM Interconnection territory where there is tremendous demand from customers, a very large and dynamic market to support solar, pending RPS change, and a federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC) that drives urgency.

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How corporate customers acquire solar energy will be the biggest change over the coming year. The corporate customer has evolved from buying voluntary renewable energy certificates (RECs), to buying compliance RECs, to actually contracting for the output of electricity from a specific renewable energy project. This evolution has largely been driven by the concept of additionality. Corporates want to know that there is a causal relationship between their efforts to procure renewable energy and new builds.

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Additionally, and just as importantly, module efficiency is increasing. Increased adoption of PERC, N-type cells, split cell, and bifacial will drive module performance increasingly upward. A standard 350-watt module in 2018 will become a 380-watt module over the next year, increasing energy density, reducing installation costs, and increasing overall output.

To further this trend, balance-of-system costs and architectures are improving. Tracker performance at a sub-array level is increasing (for example, see the TrueCapture technology our friends at Nextracker launched recently), creating a projected 2 percent more energy. DC optimizers will create 3-5 percent more energy longer-term, while mono-PERC and bifacial modules may add up to 5 percent more efficiency. These are small changes by themselves, but create significant uplift together.

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All of this means that we’ll build vastly less expensive yet more efficient solar. Utility-scale projects are being built at 90-95 cents per watt right now. That was unthinkable two years ago. We’ll build at or below 85 cents per watt in the near future. This pricing has led to sub-3 cent PPA prices from solar projects. There is no other technology that can compete. Lazard, as they have for years, does a great job of illustrating this in their annual Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) Report.

Lurk

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3453 on: March 03, 2019, 01:18:04 AM »
When a company (or community organization) buy electricity from a solar or wind provider under a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA), they are purchasing a certain amount of energy at a set price.  Their money goes directly to the wind or solar provider, who can then invest that money in new wind or solar projects.

In most cases, the PPA specifies which solar or wind farm the electricity is coming from.  If that farm doesn't have the capacity to supply the electricity, the owner of the renewable farm either has to expand it to increase the capacity or the deal isn't made.

In Australia, that's the point of the Government accreditation of the solar or wind farms.  In the US, there are production tax credits involved.

I do not think that is telling the whole/real story. It does not really answer my questions about 3M/GM, and I deleted a latter response because it doesn't say much about what's going on. It looks a little like a pea and shell game using 'financial instruments'. I am unsure atm.

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the wind or solar provider, who can then invest that money in new wind or solar projects.

Like is that really true? It looked to me the PPA from 3m and gm were about the supplier obtaining sufficient financial security to enable it to actually build the project that was going to supply that power - not to finance the next one.

"Data center owners Amazon, Google, and Microsoft have used PPAs to offset the emissions and power usage of cloud computing."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_purchase_agreement (unreliable as a ref but a start)

"A solar power purchase agreement (PPA) is a financial agreement where a developer arranges for the design, permitting, financing and installation of a solar energy system on a customer’s property at little to no cost." ....... ?
https://www.seia.org/research-resources/solar-power-purchase-agreements
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jai mitchell

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3454 on: March 03, 2019, 05:46:52 PM »
Hornsea 1 in the North Sea (UK) has begun production 7 MW wind turbines

This video shows the current project and how Hornsea 2 will come in at a price about half that of Hornsea 1  Hornsea 2 will tout higher turbines at 8.4 MW each.



Upon completion it will have 1.2 GW of generational capacity at a very high capacity factor.

Hornsea II will tout larger wind turbines and their projected capacity factor will approach 60%

http://euanmearns.com/uk-offshore-wind-capacity-factors-a-semi-statistical-analysis/

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Ken Feldman

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3455 on: March 04, 2019, 08:28:29 PM »
When a company (or community organization) buy electricity from a solar or wind provider under a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA), they are purchasing a certain amount of energy at a set price.  Their money goes directly to the wind or solar provider, who can then invest that money in new wind or solar projects.

In most cases, the PPA specifies which solar or wind farm the electricity is coming from.  If that farm doesn't have the capacity to supply the electricity, the owner of the renewable farm either has to expand it to increase the capacity or the deal isn't made.

In Australia, that's the point of the Government accreditation of the solar or wind farms.  In the US, there are production tax credits involved.

I do not think that is telling the whole/real story. It does not really answer my questions about 3M/GM, and I deleted a latter response because it doesn't say much about what's going on. It looks a little like a pea and shell game using 'financial instruments'. I am unsure atm.

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the wind or solar provider, who can then invest that money in new wind or solar projects.

Like is that really true? It looked to me the PPA from 3m and gm were about the supplier obtaining sufficient financial security to enable it to actually build the project that was going to supply that power - not to finance the next one.

"Data center owners Amazon, Google, and Microsoft have used PPAs to offset the emissions and power usage of cloud computing."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_purchase_agreement (unreliable as a ref but a start)

"A solar power purchase agreement (PPA) is a financial agreement where a developer arranges for the design, permitting, financing and installation of a solar energy system on a customer’s property at little to no cost." ....... ?
https://www.seia.org/research-resources/solar-power-purchase-agreements

As the Wikipedia article explains, there are many types of PPAs, including commercial and community organization PPAs.  The SEIA website seems to be about those (note the part about the solar panels being on the purchaser's property).  Here's an overview of Corporate PPAs:

https://www.dlapiper.com/en/uk/insights/publications/2016/06/renewable-energy-global-paper/what-are-corporate-power-purchase-agreements-ppa/

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A Corporate Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) is a long-term contract under which a business agrees to purchase electricity directly from an energy generator. This differs from the traditional approach of simply buying electricity from licensed electricity suppliers, often known as utility PPAs.

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The corporate off-taker will enter into a long term PPA (commonly with a term in excess of 10 to 15 years) with renewable energy generator to take all of the energy generated by its plant (or portfolio of plants), commonly for a fixed price per kWh (subject to some form of indexation).

While the energy is "notional" and not real, the plant owner can't legally enter into multiple PPAs with the energy generate from the same plant.  Once all of the power is accounted for by PPAs, the solar or wind farm owner will either need to expand the plant or build new ones.


Ken Feldman

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3456 on: March 04, 2019, 08:51:46 PM »
The first large-scale solar farm in North Dakota is starting construction.

https://bismarcktribune.com/news/state-and-regional/north-dakota-s-first-commercial-solar-energy-project-gets-ok/article_30b14097-1f6e-51ac-bd62-77d852997bca.html

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FARGO — North Dakota’s first commercial solar energy complex will start construction this spring in rural Cass County’s Harmony Township and go into operation in 2020.

The $250 million project will sprawl over 1,600 acres and have a capacity of up to 200 megawatts — generating enough electricity to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 240,000 metric tons, or the equivalent of taking 50,000 cars off the road every year.

sidd

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3457 on: March 04, 2019, 11:24:28 PM »
China shows the way: builds out UHV DC and AC and proposes transcontinental UHV grid

Fairley at ieee spectrum has detail. For those so minded, there is a link to a pdf about line commutation control which gives some of the math behind the grid.

https://spectrum.ieee.org/energy/the-smarter-grid/chinas-ambitious-plan-to-build-the-worlds-biggest-supergrid

sidd

Ken Feldman

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3458 on: March 05, 2019, 06:27:13 PM »
Results of the most recent solar power auction in India:

https://cleantechnica.com/2019/03/04/india-witnesses-sharp-fall-in-solar-tariffs-in-750-megawatt-auction/

They received bids for more projects than they planned to install.

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Rajasthan, being one of the most favored states for project developers to set up projects, saw massive over-subscription of the tender. Against an offered capacity of 750 megawatts, project developers placed bids to set up 2.37 gigawatts of solar power capacity.

The bids came from international firms and Indian firms, and the prices were really low.

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Finland-based project developer Fortum Solar placed the lowest tariff bid of Rs 2.48/kWh (3.49¢/kWh). The company managed to secure 250 megawatts of capacity. An Indian conglomerate also entered the solar power auctions for the first time and bagged 40 megawatts of capacity at the same tariff.

One of India’s largest solar power independent power producers, Acme Solar, secured rights to develop 250 megawatts of capacity at the same tariff. The company jointly holds the record for the lowest-ever tariff bid placed by any company in India of Rs 2.44/kWh (3.44¢/kWh).

A subsidiary of UPC Renewables, which also successfully bid in recently concluded Gujarat solar power auction, managed to grab 250 megawatts of capacity, also at Rs 2.48/kWh (3.49¢/kWh). ReNew Power, a major competitor to Acme Solar, placed a bid to develop 360 megawatts capacity but could manage to secure only 110 megawatts of capacity as it placed a marginally higher bid of Rs 2.49/kWh (3.51¢/kWh).

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The lowest tariff discovered in this auction is around 3% lower than the lowest tariff bid placed in the recently concluded 1.2 gigawatt national-level auction. The lowest winning bid in the national-level tender was Rs 2.55/kWh (3.59¢/kWh).

The notable decline in tariff bids in the Rajasthan solar power tender is likely due to the favorable land lease policy of the state government, presence of sufficient and ready-to-use transmission infrastructure, and certainty of power purchase by Rajasthan-based power distribution utilities.


Ken Feldman

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3459 on: March 05, 2019, 07:21:38 PM »
I think Lurk and I actually have the same goals and would like to ultimately see all of the world's energy come from carbon free sources, and the sooner the better.  It seems he objects to my pollyana-ish language, so I'll try a different tone. :P

Yet another corporation is refusing to wait for the global systemic change requiring them to use carbon free energy sources and has instead installed a massive solar power plant.

https://bigthink.com/technology-innovation/disney-builds-massive-solar-facility-to-cut-emissions-in-half-by-2020

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You know who's one of the world's leaders in tackling greenhouse gas emissions? You might be surprised to know that the venerable corporation that brought us Mickey Mouse is staying ahead of the pack by following through on its pledge to cut emissions by 50 percent. Disney's goal is to reach half the emissions it had in 2012 by the year 2020.

One big way the entertainment juggernaut is making its commitment a reality is by opening an enormous new 270-acre, 50-megawatt solar facility in Florida. It went online in 2019 to provide clean renewable energy to the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando. As stated on Disney's blog, the facility will generate so much power, Disney will be able to use it to operate two of its four theme parks in Central Florida.

The new solar farm, consisting of more than half a million panels, will majorly reduce net greenhouse gas emissions, lowering them by more than 57,000 tons per year.

The article is silent on the economics on the deal and instead quotes a corporate spokesperson blathering about "being a responsible citizen of the world".

Archimid

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3460 on: March 05, 2019, 11:53:08 PM »
Millennial Lithium’s project center in Argentina goes solar


http://www.mining.com/millennial-lithiums-project-center-argentina-goes-solar/

In a media statement, the Vancouver-based miner highlighted that a state-of-the-art hybrid solar power system is in charge of providing electricity to the center while reducing CO2 emissions by 147 tonnes annually and the costs for fuel by $250,000 per year.
I am an energy reservoir seemingly intent on lowering entropy for self preservation.

Lurk

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3461 on: March 06, 2019, 02:13:47 AM »
It seems he objects to my pollyana-ish language ...


You are correct about the first part of your comment. But off the mark with this one above. How you speak, your style, beliefs and your opinions are fine. As is your "emphasis" even if I think it;s a little over the top/exaggerated at times. But we all do that when it comes to what we feel and believe is the important "message".

I think (and hope) if one had an objective view at my own (at times over-exaggerated) responses I generally "focus" on the missing details, especially in regard "media/blog" references. I don't claim to know everything about everything but when I see distortions and extreme cherry-picking or laziness by "journos/PR hucksters" this is what motivates me. I abhor people being misled by only hearing a slice of a story that claims to be the whole cake.

And/or appears to be the most important issue when it is not. Or where a series, a pattern of narratives keeps saying the same things that when taken together overtime presents a distorted reality of what is - this can occur even when everything said is basically correct and true in itself - but it's what is consistently missing from that narrative that causes the distortions in peoples minds and therefore their beliefs if they hear it often enough. 

That's my focus on these pages. Nothing personal and yes my own style and choice of words can also be a pain but that's really not the point is it. I do try to look past peoples beliefs opinions and style and see what the "information" is behind that which they are relying on. That's my "focus" even if sometimes I get the "facts" wrong myself or miss the mark in telling the whole story or placing things in the broader context - but no one can ever do that to everyone else's satisfaction.

Misrepresentations by the media, by politicians, by lukewarm scientists, by deniers, by greenies, by corporations, by PR writers, by advertisers, by bloggers, by forum/news media comment posters, by CEOs including Elon Musk, by religion and cults, by anyone in fact, has been a life long trigger and therefore a personal interest for all kinds of psychological personal reasons. The later half of my life has been spent learning everything I can about this phenomena. It's a key reason why I was never ever a potential victim of climate science denialism - and that had little to do with my climate science knowledge at the time - but was a motivator to get to the scientific facts as well and what they really "meant".

My Taurus Excretus antennas are highly tuned and nuanced. ;) (imho)  It is not a necessity to always know the all the objective facts to still be able to establish someone is lying through their teeth or so biased and unknowing their word is always unreliable and not credible.

eg I have a lot of faith in my ability to pick a Pathological Narcissist on the other side of the world - when I have had enough time to see them speaking and/or reading what they say and how they say it and what they look like when they are saying it. (That is not to say anyone else's here is worse or I am better than.) And it is not a comment about participants here but about those in power and those who have positions of 'authority' including in the media eg Luke Harding of The Guardian, Chris Monckton, or as easy as 'nailing' Donald Trump and his main competition in 2016. 

However my apologies for when I do come across as too harsh, strident, or intolerant and might appear to be blaming the 'poster' for the material they post. I try hard not to yet it is still a work in progress.
"You assist an unjust administration most effectively by obeying its orders and decrees. [...] A good person will resist an evil system with his whole soul. Disobedience of the laws of an evil state is therefore a duty."
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Ken Feldman

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3462 on: March 06, 2019, 07:39:07 PM »
I think (and hope) if one had an objective view at my own (at times over-exaggerated) responses I generally "focus" on the missing details, especially in regard "media/blog" references. I don't claim to know everything about everything but when I see distortions and extreme cherry-picking or laziness by "journos/PR hucksters" this is what motivates me. I abhor people being misled by only hearing a slice of a story that claims to be the whole cake.

...

However my apologies for when I do come across as too harsh, strident, or intolerant and might appear to be blaming the 'poster' for the material they post. I try hard not to yet it is still a work in progress.

Lurk,

Thanks for your very gracious post.  I'll try to do a better job of stating when the sources I'm quoting from are PR for industry firms and try to find additional information to verify the data they provide, or at least highlight some of the uncertainties in their stories.

Ken Feldman

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3463 on: March 06, 2019, 07:57:13 PM »
PV magazine, which covers the international photovoltaic solar trade, published an article about off-grid solar systems in remote locations.  Before I get to that article, here's a little background info about the source.  PV Magazine covers trends in markets and technologies and in the "About" section on their website claims,

Quote
pv magazine readers comprise:

By industry sector
◦PV manufacturers (cells, modules, components) and suppliers (equipment, materials)
◦International project developers, system integrators and distributors
◦Financial/political sector

By job title
◦Directors, presidents, chief executives
◦Engineering executives
◦Engineering managers, project managers
◦Financial executives

(For the record, I'm none of those, I just do internet searches for articles on the energy sector and post the ones that I think are interesting).

Here's an article, dated March 5, 2019, about the potential for growth in off-grid systems in developing countries around the world.

https://www.pv-magazine.com/2019/03/05/off-grid-solar-could-bring-electricity-to-740-million-people-by-2022/

They lead with an example project that appears to be under construction in Tanzania.

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Some 80,000 people living on a cluster of islands on Lake Victoria have reason to rejoice. Renewable energy developer RP Global has started work on 11 solar hybrid mini-grids on their islands, promising energy access to 20 villages on the Tanzanian side of the lake.

The company said a second stage of the project would see a further 11 mini-grids installed to power 23 more villages and bring the total number of people to benefit from the EU-backed project to 160,000.

The article then states how off grid energy projects increased in the past few years.

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Meanwhile, the Strategic investments in off-grid energy access: Scaling the utility of the future for the last mile report by analyst Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables spells out how investment in off-grid solar, mini-grids and universal energy access projects is continuing to climb steeply. Commitments to the sector reportedly experienced a 37% year on year increase from 2016 to 2017. Between 2017 and last year, investment climbed 22%. Last year’s investment volume was clocked at $511 million and almost $1.7 billion has been poured into the sector to date.

Later in the story, the authors cite a report from Woods Mackenzie (a UK based stockbroker that prepares reports analyzing various industries for investors) comparing the costs of grid connected solar to the off grid systems.

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The Wood Mackenzie report states a utility grid connection for rural villages would cost around $500-$2,200, on average, per connection. By contrast, small-scale PV systems with a 5-250 Wdc capacity, operated on a pay-as-you-go basis, would cost around $80-$550, on average. While DC mini-grids with 25-500 kW capacities are more expensive, and prices per connection vary greatly, they are still cheaper than a utility connection.

Wood Mackenzie notes the universal energy access sector – especially the off-grid solar segment – and solar mini-grids are experiencing a steep uptick in strategic investment and partnerships from oil and gas majors, European utilities and independent power producers, clean energy original equipment makers, and the technology sector. Partners such as those see new business opportunities in fast-growing emerging markets


Ken Feldman

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3464 on: March 07, 2019, 06:42:48 PM »
The following article discussing a new PPA between Microsoft and Invenergy in North Carolina appears on the website of Zacks Equity Research.  They appear to be an investment advisor (possibly making money from selling stocks and bonds to investors).

https://www.zacks.com/stock/news/358023/microsoft-invenergy-collaborate-for-renewable-energy-project

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Microsoft (MSFT  -  Free Report) is collaborating with Invenergy to work on a solar project based out of Beaufort County, NC. The new 74-megawatt Wilkinson Solar Energy Center project is slated to commence operations in 2019.

Founded in 2001, Invenergy is a privately held company primarily engaged in developing sustainable energy solutions and operating storage facilities across the Americas, Asia and Europe.

Microsoft entered into a 15-year deal, by which it will be the single off-taker of the renewable energy produced by Wilkinson Solar Energy Center. The facility is anticipated to generate local investment of $20 million and estimated to create approximately 500 jobs in the course of construction.

The latest deal is in sync with the company’s strategy to promote the usage of renewable energy in a bid to keep costs under control and reduce carbon emission. In fact, Microsoft intends to achieve early 60% dependency on renewable energy for its power requirements by the end of 2020.

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To operate a cloud infrastructure, data centers are required that in turn need a steady and unwavering power supply to function properly. Given the growing demand for cloud, demand for datacenters and power is likely to increase in the future. To meet the power requirements, many major cloud players are turning to renewable sources of energy and Microsoft is no different.

We note that dependence on renewable resources to cut down on operating costs is just another way to be more competitive and profitable, and Microsoft’s decision to do so augurs well for the company in the long run.

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Further, Microsoft has completed a few large-scale corporate Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) to buy renewable energy in the United States. The new project is estimated to expand the company’s total renewable energy portfolio to approximately 1.3 gigawatts. Reportedly, Microsoft’s cloud platform Azure “has been carbon-neutral since 2012”.

Other companies like Apple (AAPL  -  Free Report) , Alphabet (GOOGL  -  Free Report) , Amazon (AMZN  -  Free Report) and Walmart, among others, are also seeking greater use of renewable energy in their operations. In fact, Apple and Alphabet owned Google have achieved 100% renewables target and are powered by green energy. Amazon Web Services (AWS) attained 50% dependency on renewable energy in January 2018, and has plans to hit 100% target in the longer haul.

Undoubtedly, going green will help big companies to save on costs and protect the environment at the same time. Moreover, it is expected to help reduce global warming and fossil fuel consumption.

Ken Feldman

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3465 on: March 13, 2019, 07:03:44 PM »
Wind and solar provided almost 65% of Germany's power last week:

https://www.cleanenergywire.org/news/wind-provides-half-germanys-power-whole-week

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Thanks to strong winds, electricity production in Germany achieved a new record share of nearly 65 percent renewables last week, research institute Fraunhofer ISE has found. Wind turbines, solar panels and other renewable energy sources contributed 64.8 percent to the country’s net power production between March 4 and 10, the institute says in a press release. Wind power turbines alone reached the new record share of 48.4 percent of power production in Europe’s biggest economy. “These figures show that the envisaged goal [of the German government] of 65 percent renewables by 2030 is technically feasible,” researcher Bruno Burger said, adding that the goal now was to sustain a high renewables share for an entire year. According to Fraunhofer, lignite and hard coal plants only ran at minimum output during that week, while nuclear plants were curtailed during the night. The share of lignite in the power production mix fell to 12 percent, half of its average share in 2018. While the share of renewables overall reached 40.2 percent in 2018, it stood at 43.3 percent after the first ten weeks of 2019, Fraunhofer added.

b_lumenkraft

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3466 on: March 13, 2019, 07:09:44 PM »
Wind and solar provided almost 65% of Germany's power last week:

Live updates can be looked up here:

Wöchentlicher Anteil erneuerbarer Energien an der Stromerzeugung in Deutschland in 2019
(Weekly share of renewable power sources in Germany's power grid)
Link >> https://www.energy-charts.de/ren_share_de.htm?source=ren-share&period=weekly&year=2019

Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3467 on: March 13, 2019, 08:57:31 PM »
U.S.

New Mexico to commit to 100 percent carbon-free electricity by 2045
Quote
In addition to the carbon-free electricity goal, New Mexico’s Energy Transition Act calls for 80 percent of electricity to come from renewable energy sources by 2040. Other incremental benchmarks include 50 percent renewable energy sources by 2030 and 40 percent by 2025.
https://electrek.co/2019/03/13/new-mexico-100-2045/
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Ken Feldman

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3468 on: March 15, 2019, 06:25:28 PM »
Please note that the arcticle linked below appears to quote from a GE press release about a new model of wind turbine, and thus may be a little too optimistic for some readers.  I'm posting it because the article illustrates the technology improvements that are currently happening in the wind energy industry and how they will allow the amount of wind power being deployed to continue to increase.

https://cleantechnica.com/2019/03/14/ge-installs-worlds-largest-onshore-wind-turbine-in-the-netherlands-the-5-3-megawatt-cypress/

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A year later, GE Renewable Energy announced the upgraded 5.3 MW version and the new “Cypress Platform” naming convention. The new Cypress turbines are designed to produce over 20 gigawatt-hours of power annually and offer a 50% increase in Annual Energy Production over their lifespan.

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“We’re delighted with the progress our team has been able to make in bringing our innovative, high-tech turbine to market on an accelerated schedule,” said Jérôme Pécresse, CEO of GE Renewable Energy. “We are confident that Cypress, with its two-piece blade design, will be a game changer for the industry. We’re hearing equal enthusiasm from our customers across the globe, who tell us they appreciate the potential of Cypress to help them both lower the cost of onshore wind and gain added flexibility in siting turbines.”

The Cypress Platform of turbines are offered with multiple power ratings and varying hub heights, enabling a lower cost of electricity by matching each wind turbine to specific site needs. Designed with a “revolutionary” two-piece blade design which makes it possible to use larger rotors and site the turbines in a wider variety of locations, the Cypress turbines can thus be installed at locations that were previously inaccessible.

Ken Feldman

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3469 on: March 19, 2019, 07:22:40 PM »
The State of Washington is leasing land for a solar farm at 150 times the revenue it was receiving for grazing fees.

https://pv-magazine-usa.com/2019/03/15/solar-power-increases-land-lease-rate-by-150x-for-washington-state/

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Would you rather lease your land for $300/acre/year for 20+ years in a fixed contract (probably with a 1-3% escalator)? Or for $2/acre/year? The State of Washington has put pen to paper with an answer.

Avangrid Renewables has signed a power purchase agreement (PPA) with Puget Sound Energy (PSE) for their currently under development 150 MWac / ~190 MWdc solar power plant located in Klickitat County, Washington – named the Lund Hill Solar Project. The project’s electricity will be sold through the utility’s Green Direct program which sells 100% green energy options to commercial entities.

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The second round of PSE’s offering of the Green Direct program is already fully subscribed and will be a blend of wind and solar, with the Lund Hill Solar project supplying the solar product. The state of Washington is one of the largest customers in PSE’s Green Direct program, which has more than 40 customers signed up to receive the wind and solar power.

Lund Hill Solar will be located on approximately 1,800 acres, a mix of land leased from private landowners and the Washington Department of Natural Resources, the state’s first solar power land lease. 480 acres of that land will be leased from the State of Washington. Prior, the state was leasing the land for $2/acre/year for cattle grazing. The goal is to have 500 megawatts of solar capacity operating on leased state lands by 2025.

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #3470 on: March 19, 2019, 07:43:46 PM »
Here's some more information about the Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) that is helping to fund the  Lund Hill solar farm in Washington:

https://solarindustrymag.com/avangrid-scores-utility-ppa-for-150-mw-washington-solar-project/

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PSE’s second-round offering of the Green Direct program is already fully subscribed and will be a blend of wind and solar, with the Lund Hill Solar Project supplying the solar product. Lund Hill would represent an investment of more than $100 million by Avangrid Renewables, and PSE’s power purchase agreement (PPA) would cover the entire output of the solar project, which is still in development and is anticipated to reach commercial operation in 2020.
 
As announced recently by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Lund Hill Solar would be located on approximately 1,800 acres on a mix of land leased from private landowners and DNR.

“This is an incredible example of the public and private sector coming together to transform the trajectory of renewable energy in Washington state,” says Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, who announced last October that eight state agencies would be joining the Green Direct program with a commitment to purchase more than 100 million kWh of in-state wind and solar electricity by 2021. “This project will help us fight climate change, create clean energy jobs and save agencies thousands of dollars in energy costs. This is what Washington’s energy future is all about.”

The state of Washington is one of the largest customers in PSE’s Green Direct program, which has more than 40 customers signed up to receive wind and solar power.

Individuals, government agencies and companies in PSE's service district can sign up for the Green Direct program, which allows PSE to combine their power demand and then sign a PPA with a renewable energy provider.  In 2017, when the program was first launched, it was considered to be a model for other utilities.

https://www.wri.org/blog/2017/04/washington-state-pioneers-new-model-utility-scale-renewable-energy

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Many businesses in Washington state want to use renewable energy. Starbucks, REI and Microsoft are all iconic brands in the Pacific Northwest making big commitments to wind and solar. Of the 65 companies that have signed the Corporate Renewable Energy Buyers Principles, more than a dozen use substantial energy in Washington state. Public sector energy users like King County and the Port of Seattle have also committed to renewable power.

Nonetheless, Washington’s large energy buyers have found it difficult to access renewable energy because nearly all buyers must go through their utilities to buy energy. Those utilities still use at least some fossil fuel-based sources.

Washington’s largest investor-owned utility, Puget Sound Energy (PSE), announced today that it will meet some of those needs with Green Direct, a new renewable energy program, or green tariff. Green tariffs are programs offered by electricity utilities that allow eligible customers to buy energy from a renewable project as well as the Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) the customers have traditionally purchased. PSE’s new tariff is the first of its kind, offering a model for other utilities around the country to offer affordable renewable energy through the grid to smaller, existing customers. Green Direct’s first subscribers include commercial customers (REI, Starbucks, Target), local governments (Anacortes, Bellevue, King County, Mercer Island and Snoqualmie) and local institutions (Western Washington University and Sound Transit).