Support the Arctic Sea Ice Forum and Blog

Author Topic: Renewable Energy  (Read 842343 times)

Ken Feldman

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1274
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 118
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4750 on: May 08, 2020, 07:11:27 PM »
Geothermal energy is a 24/7 source of renewable energy.  And you don't need to be in a volcanic area to use it.  An abandoned coal mine in England is being converted into a geothermal heat source for municipal buildings.

https://electrek.co/2020/05/08/coal-mine-south-tyneside-england-geothermal-heating-system/

Quote
Dormant coal mine in northeast England to become geothermal heating system
Michelle Lewis
- May. 8th 2020

A coal mine in South Tyneside that has been abandoned since 1932 will be transformed into a green energy heating system as part of a new £7 million renewable energy plan.

Quote
Water will be extracted from the coal mines through drilled vertical boreholes that are 300-400 meters deep. A water-source heat pump installed at the project’s energy center will extract the heat from the mine water and compress it to a much higher temperature and then distribute it across the district heat network. Cooled water will then be returned to the mines.

The minewater heating system will be powered by solar panels.

Ken Feldman

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1274
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 118
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4751 on: May 12, 2020, 09:05:58 PM »
Despite short term supply chain disruptions, Wyoming's renewable projects are on schedule to open this year.

https://trib.com/business/energy/renewable-energy-projects-forge-ahead-in-wyoming-despite-pandemic/article_d1cadc40-21d5-5aa9-8386-934bee7ddb15.html

Quote
Renewable energy projects forge ahead in Wyoming despite pandemic
Camille Erickson May 11, 2020

Renewable energy sources have contributed to more of the nation’s electricity supply than coal this spring, despite a national slowdown in electricity demand, according to new data analyzed by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis. Low-cost and readily available wind, solar and hydropower energy supplied more electricity to the market than coal for the entire month of April, according to the energy transition think tank.

Coal-fired power appears to have taken the biggest hit among electricity suppliers during the pandemic, making up just 15 percent of the nation’s electricity share on certain days last month. Renewable energy contributions have been largely unaffected by the pandemic due in part to the sources’ low cost and immediate availability when electricity demand wanes.

Quote
A look at Wyoming wind projects

As the state’s largest utility, Rocky Mountain Power owns about a dozen wind projects in Wyoming and has several power purchase agreements with companies overseeing a number of additional wind farms in the state, according to its most recent integrated resource plan. And Rocky Mountain Powers’s Energy Vision 2020 — a $3.1 billion renewable energy initiative launched in 2017 — is still on track to be completed by the end of the year, according to Spencer Hall, the utility’s spokesman.

“Despite pressure on project timelines due to COVID-19, Rocky Mountain Power plans to complete the Energy Vision 2020 projects by the end of this year,” Hall told the Star-Tribune.

Several wind projects — TB Flats I and II, Ekola Flats and Cedar Springs — will come into service by the end of the year, equipping the state with an additional 1,150 megawatts in wind generation capacity. Recently, Rocky Mountain Power also fully acquired the state’s first wind facility, Foot Creek in Carbon County, as part of its plan to increase the site’s power capacity by 60 percent. The company’s repowering projects at Dunlap and Foot Creek I facilities are still set to be wrapped up by December too.

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 17604
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 822
  • Likes Given: 299
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4752 on: May 14, 2020, 02:40:29 PM »
Biggest U.S. solar project approved in Southern Nevada despite critics
May 11, 2020
Quote
RENO — The Trump administration announced final approval Monday of a massive solar plant about 30 miles northeast of Las Vegas despite objections from conservationists who say it will destroy thousands of acres of habitat critical to the survival of the threatened Mojave desert tortoise in Nevada.

The $1 billion Gemini Solar Project will extend across 7,100 acres in the Mojave Desert, making it the largest solar project in U.S. history and the eighth largest in the world. It is expected to produce 690 megawatts of electricity — enough to power 260,000 households in Nevada, Arizona and California — and annually offset greenhouse emissions of about 83,000 cars.

It will create about 2,000 direct and indirect jobs and inject an estimated $712.5 million in the economy as the nation tries to recover from the downturn brought on by the coronavirus outbreak, Interior Secretary David Bernhardt said.
...
The first phase of the project covering about 11 square miles of federal land is expected to be completed next year with 440 MW of solar capacity for use in Nevada. Another 250 MW of generating capacity would be added in the second phase with the power sold in Nevada or exported to Arizona and California in 2022.
...
The site location is also home to desert horned lizards, kit foxes and a wide range of diverse ecosystems.

But Mark Boyadjian, a managing partner of the California-based Arevia Power, one of the developers behind the project, said large-scale renewable energy projects are key in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, leading causes of wildlife habitat destruction.

“Renewable energy developers play a key role in combating climate change while also developing projects in a way that preserves as much habitat as possible,” he said.

Officials behind the project say they have developed measures to mitigate the environmental impacts, opting for a mowing method they say will result in fewer impacts on native vegetation and wildlife, like the desert tortoise. ...
https://lasvegassun.com/news/2020/may/11/biggest-us-solar-project-approved-nevada-critics/

The joint venture by Australia’s Quinbrook Infrastructure Partners and California-based Arevia Power is part of an integrated resource plan Nevada’s Public Utilities Commission approved last year for NV Energy, which is owned by billionaire Warren Buffet and is Nevada's largest utility.
Coupled with a 380 megawatt AC battery storage system, it will be one of the first in Nevada to include batteries to enable power delivery after the sun goes down.
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Ken Feldman

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1274
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 118
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4753 on: May 14, 2020, 11:46:45 PM »
California is adding 770 MW of batteries to a huge solar farm, allowing it to retire four natural gas power plants.

https://www.latimes.com/environment/newsletter/2020-05-14/boiling-point-battery-revolution-clean-energy-boiling-point

Quote
Boiling Point: Giant batteries are changing everything for clean energy
 By Sammy RothStaff Writer
May 14, 2020

Quote
Edison announced this month that it’s buying 770 megawatts of batteries, more than half of which will be installed at this remote outpost near the city of Blythe. The batteries will help Edison replace four gas-burning power plants along the Southern California coast, in part by storing electricity generated by solar panels for times when the sun isn’t shining.

For context, 770 megawatts is more energy storage than was installed in the entire United States last year. It’s enough batteries to meet about 3.5% of all the mid-afternoon electricity demand on California’s main power grid so far this week.

rboyd

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1330
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 249
  • Likes Given: 52
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4754 on: May 15, 2020, 02:01:10 AM »
Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) has its 2019 report out, you can download it from their website.
In 2019, 60.4 GW of wind capacity was installed globally (vs. a previous forecast for 2019 of 65 GW by GWEC).

The future forecast is
2020: 76.1 GW (compared to previous report's forecast of 67 GW)
2021: 76.4 GW (vs. 61 GW)
2022: 67.7 GW (vs. 65 GW)
2023: 66.2 GW (vs. 58 GW)
2024: 73.4 GW

So the early 2019 GWEC forecast for all of 2019 was about 5GW above the actuals. Future forecasts raised a bit vs. the previous report.

A five year compound growth rate in new installs of 4% per year. This was done before COVID, so 2020 may be lower than forecast. Big jump this year driven by subsidy reductions at the end of year in the US and China.

China transitioning to a "no subsidy" world and pretty flay in new installation until 2024, same as Europe. US jumps this year and then falls back and stays flat to 2024. Some growth in the Middle East and North Africa. Not a comforting forecast with respect to replacing fossil fuels.

Ken Feldman

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1274
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 118
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4755 on: May 15, 2020, 08:34:55 PM »
Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) has its 2019 report out, you can download it from their website.
In 2019, 60.4 GW of wind capacity was installed globally (vs. a previous forecast for 2019 of 65 GW by GWEC).

The future forecast is
2020: 76.1 GW (compared to previous report's forecast of 67 GW)
2021: 76.4 GW (vs. 61 GW)
2022: 67.7 GW (vs. 65 GW)
2023: 66.2 GW (vs. 58 GW)
2024: 73.4 GW

So the early 2019 GWEC forecast for all of 2019 was about 5GW above the actuals. Future forecasts raised a bit vs. the previous report.

A five year compound growth rate in new installs of 4% per year. This was done before COVID, so 2020 may be lower than forecast. Big jump this year driven by subsidy reductions at the end of year in the US and China.

China transitioning to a "no subsidy" world and pretty flay in new installation until 2024, same as Europe. US jumps this year and then falls back and stays flat to 2024. Some growth in the Middle East and North Africa. Not a comforting forecast with respect to replacing fossil fuels.

GWEC actually underestimated the growth in their 2017 forecasts (they were predicting 57.5GW vs. the 60.4GW that was actually installed):

https://gwec.net/global-figures/market-forecast-2012-2016/

Quote
The aftermath of the global financial crisis in the previous decade resulted in average global markets of about 40 GW/annum for the period from 2009 to 2013. Breaking through the 50 GW barrier for the first time in 2014, the industry set a record of more than 60 GW due to anomalously high installations in China in 2015. In 2016 the market returned to the ‘new normal’ of just over 54 GW, and 2017 was in the same general range, which is also what we expect for 2018, before the industry embarks on another growth spurt in the run up to a number of 2020 targets.




And while the Covid-19 lockdowns have resulted in slowdowns in installations, the US was off to a fast start in 2020.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/us-wind-installations-more-double-131501925.html

Quote
US Wind Installations More Than Double in Q1: Stocks in Focus
Aparajita Dutta
ZacksMay 14, 2020

While majority of the industries struggled due to the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, the U.S. wind industry held its ground with over 1,800 megawatts (MW) of new wind power capacity installed in first-quarter 2020. This came as a major confidence booster for renewable investors, particularly those who have wind stocks in their portfolio.

Per the latest report published by American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), eleven new wind projects totaling 1,821 MW became operational during the first quarter, 117% higher than the first quarter of 2019. The United States now has 107,443 MW of operating wind power capacity, with nearly 60,000 wind turbines operating in 41 states and two territories.

Quote
Moreover, construction activity reached a new record in the first quarter of 2020, with 24,690 MW under construction across the country, representing 11% increase from the previous quarter.

In addition, developers and corporate buyers announced their highest ever quarterly volume of new power purchase agreements (PPAs), at 2,859 MW, in the first quarter. Utilities announced 1,719 MW of PPAs, led by Evergy and AEP Energy. Corporate customers announced 430 MW of wind PPAs in the first quarter.

Quote
At the end of March 2020, near-term wind power capacity pipeline comprised 44,441 MW of wind power, including 19,751 MW in advanced development. Total pipeline increased 14% year over year driven by strong demand from utilities and corporate purchasers along with an increase in offshore wind project announcements. Moreover, per the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s recently released Short-Term Energy Outlook, the electric power sector is expected to add 20.4 gigawatts of new wind capacity in 2020, amid the COVID-19-led uncertainty.




Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 17604
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 822
  • Likes Given: 299
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4756 on: May 16, 2020, 07:45:45 PM »
Tesla Powerpack Saved University of Queensland Almost $74K in 3 Months
Quote
The 1.1 MW/2.15 MWh Tesla Powerpack battery system installed at the University of Queensland saved almost $ 74,000 in energy costs in just three months, and not just by storing cheap solar energy.

The UQ Energy and Sustainability Team has released a report for the Q1 2020 of its battery system. The results show that a battery system that pays for itself by saving from the university’s existing solar systems received $ 73,938 in the first quarter of 2020. And it did this not just by storing energy when grid prices were low and discharging when they were high, but also – in fact, mostly – by helping to balance the grid, including jumping to attention when major coal plants failed.
 ...
62% of the value generated by the UQ battery system over the quarter was generated through participation in what’s known as frequency control ancillary services, or FCAS. ...
https://www.tesmanian.com/blogs/tesmanian-blog/tesla-battery-system-earns-university-nearly-74-000-in-3-months
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

oren

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5540
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 1721
  • Likes Given: 1609
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4757 on: May 17, 2020, 08:58:03 AM »
Sig, any idea about the cost of this battery system installation?

Henry

  • New ice
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4758 on: May 17, 2020, 10:27:47 AM »
Cost was said to be $66 million (AUD I presume). Revenue said to be about $20 million/y. ROI suggested as 3.5years.

Henry

oren

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5540
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 1721
  • Likes Given: 1609
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4759 on: May 17, 2020, 10:34:19 AM »
Thank you Henry, I think you might be referring to the Tesla Big Battery in Australia, not the one in U of Q.
I finally found this article citing a cost of $2M (supposedly AUD).
https://www.racq.com.au/TheRoadAhead/Articles/A-battery-powered-future

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 17604
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 822
  • Likes Given: 299
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4760 on: May 18, 2020, 09:14:55 PM »
Your occasional reminder that solar panels aren’t just for roofs.  The comments indicate a windowless wall space was part of the floor plan.  And it is south-facing.

https://twitter.com/AirlineFlyer/status/1262104526749917185
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 17604
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 822
  • Likes Given: 299
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4761 on: May 19, 2020, 04:04:39 PM »
Germany, Netherlands to step up power grid cooperation
Quote
BERLIN (Reuters) - Germany and the Netherlands signed an agreement on Tuesday to strengthen cooperation on electricity grids and look into different options, including Berlin taking a stake in Dutch state-owned power transmission grid operator TenneT.
...
German media have reported that Finance Minister Olaf Scholz from the co-governing Social Democrats is backing the purchase of a majority stake in TenneT’s German division, while Economy Minister Peter Altmaier from Chancellor Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrats favours a stake of roughly 25%.
...
Scholz and his Social Democrats are generally in favour of the state playing a bigger role in the sector, especially in light of massive investments needed to speed up the shift towards renewable energy. Merkel’s conservatives prefer the state to play a less active role. ..
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-germany-netherlands-grids/germany-netherlands-to-step-up-power-grid-cooperation-idUSKBN22V1RJ
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5524
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 737
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4762 on: May 20, 2020, 06:42:56 AM »
US wants rent: no more rent holiday for renewable

"ended a two-year rent holiday for solar and wind projects operating on federal lands, handing them whopping retroactive bills"

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-interior-renewables/trump-admin-slaps-solar-wind-operators-with-retroactive-rent-bills-idUSKBN22U0FW

sidd

kassy

  • Moderator
  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2050
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 1149
  • Likes Given: 806
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4763 on: May 20, 2020, 01:21:24 PM »
Interesting situation. They should have made some reservations (because they were stopped over a complaint about their height not by good government policy)?
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

gerontocrat

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 8445
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3185
  • Likes Given: 25
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4764 on: May 21, 2020, 10:33:11 PM »
Thanks to skepticalscience.com.

Energy & China - A long read but full up stuff I have yet to digest.

From the attached graph - assumes tripling energy capacity from now to 2030.
Written before Covid-19?

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-16184-x.pdf
Rapid cost decrease of renewables and storage accelerates the decarbonization of China’s power system
Quote
Abstract
The costs for solar photovoltaics, wind, and battery storage have dropped markedly since 2010, however, many recent studies and reports around the world have not adequately captured such dramatic decrease. Those costs are projected to decline further in the near future, bringing new prospects for the widespread penetration of renewables and extensive power-sector decarbonization that previous policy discussions did not fully consider. Here we show if cost trends for renewables continue, 62% of China’s electricity could come from non-fossil sources by 2030 at a cost that is 11% lower than achieved through a business-as-usual approach. Further, China’s power sector could cut half of its 2015 carbon emissions at a cost about 6% lower compared to business-as-usual conditions.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2020, 10:43:50 PM by gerontocrat »
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Ken Feldman

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1274
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 118
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4765 on: May 22, 2020, 01:22:15 AM »
Algeria plans to bring 4GW of solar projects online by 2024.

https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/OPEC-Producer-Algeria-Aims-To-Build-36B-Solar-Power-Projects.html

Quote
OPEC Producer Algeria Aims To Build $3.6B Solar Power Projects
By Tsvetana Paraskova - May 21, 2020

OPEC member Algeria plans to install up to US$3.6 billion worth of solar photovoltaic (PV) projects to produce renewable electricity for export and for meeting increasing domestic power demand.

The solar power facilities are expected to have a combined installed capacity of 4,000 megawatts (MW), the office of Prime Minister Abdelaziz Djerad said in a statement.

The OPEC member, which generates most of its electricity from natural gas, plans to have those solar PV plants installed between 2020 and 2024, the prime minister’s office said. The project for the new solar power plants, called TAFOUK1, is part of the government’s plan to boost power generation from renewable energy sources.

Ken Feldman

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1274
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 118
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4766 on: May 22, 2020, 01:45:40 AM »
Perovskite solar cells have taken a major step toward commercial feasibility.  This will have a huge impact on the deployment of solar cells in many new applications.  In addition, silicon solar cells have almost reached the limits of their ability to convert sunlight into energy; layering on perovskite will allow much more efficient solar panels to be produced.

https://scitechdaily.com/cheap-renewable-energy-a-step-closer-as-next-generation-solar-cells-pass-strict-international-tests/

Quote
Cheap Renewable Energy a Step Closer As Next-Generation Solar Cells Pass Strict International Tests

By University of Sydney May 21, 2020

Australian scientists have for the first time produced a new generation of experimental solar energy cells that pass strict International Electrotechnical Commission testing standards for heat and humidity.

The research findings, an important step towards commercial viability of perovskite solar cells, are published today (May 21, 2020) in the journal Science.

Quote
However, the energy conversion rate of silicon in solar panels is close to reaching its natural limits. So, scientists have been exploring new materials that can be stacked on top of silicon in order to improve energy conversion rates. One of the most promising materials to date is a metal halide perovskite, which may even outperform silicon on its own.

“Perovskites are a really promising prospect for solar energy systems,” said Professor Anita Ho-Baillie, the inaugural John Hooke Chair of Nanoscience at the University of Sydney. “They are a very inexpensive, 500 times thinner than silicon and are therefore flexible and ultra-lightweight. They also have tremendous energy enabling properties and high solar conversion rates.”

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/may/22/australian-researchers-claim-world-first-in-global-race-to-develop-better-solar-panels

Quote
Australian researchers claim world first in global race to develop better solar panels

Experimental cell using the potentially game-changing material perovskite passes a series of heat and humidity tests

Graham Readfearn
Published on Thu 21 May 2020

A team of Australian researchers are claiming a world first in a global race to develop cheaper, more flexible and more efficient solar panels after their experimental cell passed a series of heat and humidity tests.

Using a type of crystal material known as perovskite, the group found that a simple glass and synthetic rubber coating around the cell was enough to stop it from degrading too quickly.

Quote
Solar cells that use the crystals to convert sunlight to an electrical current are about 500 times thinner than those that use silicon – the material that’s been the basis for solar cells since the 1950s.

As well as being thinner, perovskite crystals are also flexible, meaning they could potentially have much wider applications than the brittle silicon-based cells.

Quote
“Perovskite opens the market in ways that we hadn’t thought of. It’s lightweight, it’s flexible, and you could fold it up and roll it out. For us, the sky is the limit.”

Quote
Weber said perovskite technology was “of intense interest” because it combined “a rare combination of highly desirable properties”.

The technology offered multiple “and potentially very cheap” ways of making solar cells, could be modified across different applications and allowed more efficient cells to be produced.

He added: “Typical layers have a thickness about one-hundredth the diameter of a human hair. This means that material costs can be very low as well – which is important when you want to make many square kilometres of product.

Hefaistos

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 629
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 69
  • Likes Given: 223
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4767 on: May 22, 2020, 11:28:03 AM »
Perovskite solar cells have taken a major step toward commercial feasibility.  This will have a huge impact on the deployment of solar cells in many new applications. 
...

This is a game changer.

Ken Feldman

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1274
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 118
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4768 on: May 22, 2020, 11:31:23 PM »
China installed 3.95 GW of solar in the first quarter of 2020, despite the Coronavirus shutdowns.  And they made progress on their ultra-high voltage distribution grid.

https://cleantechnica.com/2020/05/21/chinese-solar-perseveres-during-pandemic/

Quote
Chinese Solar Perseveres During Pandemic

May 21st, 2020 by Steve Hanley

All around the world, the economic disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic is having a negative effect on virtually every industry. Solar power is no exception. In China, the rate of solar installations dipped by about 25% in the first quarter of the year compared to the same quarter in 2019, but the total was still a respectable 3.95 gigawatts of new solar generating capacity. China’s National Energy Association says 2.23 gigawatts (GW) of large scale PV power was added along with 1.72 GW of smaller, distributed solar systems.

Quote
One of those new ultra high voltage transmission lines will be used to send power from a new 202.8 MW/MWh solar-plus-storage power plant being built in the desert in China’s northwestern province of Qinghai by Huanghe Hydropower Development. a state-owned utility company. The solar-plus-storage project is part of a 3,182 MW solar development plan Huanghe Hydropower announced in December. Chinese inverter maker Sungrow will supply the 1500 V, SG250HX string inverters as well as storage solutions for the facility.

The solar-plus-storage plant will be the first phase of a 16 GW renewable energy hub which will include 10 GW of solar generation capacity. Sungrow tells PV Magazine that the solar-plus-storage facility is being equipped with a sub-array energy management function able to ensure smooth power output while improving prediction accuracy for solar power generation.

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5524
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 737
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4769 on: May 23, 2020, 08:20:14 AM »
Ohio to lake erie wind: check the birds

"could not turn at night between March 1 and November 1, to limit risk to birds and bats. "

"requires LEEDCo. and its partner, Norway-based Fred Olsen Renewables, to conduct radar studies and provide the OPSB with a bird and bat impact mitigation plan, including a collision monitoring plan. Once it has submitted monitoring information, it could possibly begin operating at night between March and November, the siting board says. Until then, it must be “feathered,” or stopped overnight."

https://www.cleveland.com/news/2020/05/lake-erie-wind-turbines-approved-but-cant-operate-at-night-which-could-sink-project.html

sidd

vox_mundi

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 3372
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 2017
  • Likes Given: 263
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4770 on: May 26, 2020, 02:26:20 AM »
Unclear on the Concept ...

New and Improved Tomahawk Missile Now Runs on Corn

https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/research/a32631489/tomahawk-missile-new-fuel/

Modern cruise missiles are powered by turbine engines running off JP-10.

Scientists at Los Alamos National Labs has come up with a replacement fuel for JP-10 that uses corn bran and other feedstocks instead of petroleum products.

The result, LANL says, is a fuel that can be made entirely within the United States, using home-made agricultural products. Unlike petroleum-based JP-10, the feedstock-based method doesn’t require harsh acids to manufacture, making it more environmentally friendly to use as well.

The fuel is made with a byproduct of the process for making corn-based ethanol, making more efficient use of the corn and giving ethanol manufacturers an incentive to manufacture it.

Perhaps the most important aspect of the new formulation: it’s entirely renewable and made with America’s largest crop.

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

Hefaistos

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 629
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 69
  • Likes Given: 223
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4771 on: May 26, 2020, 05:45:32 AM »
Great new concept of the war machine propaganda: sustainable warfare.
"Our cruise missiles run on green fuel, and will be recycled. Either by us, or our enemies, to the benefit of the local economy."

KiwiGriff

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 707
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 401
  • Likes Given: 112
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4772 on: May 26, 2020, 06:52:44 AM »
Michael Moore film Planet of the Humans removed from YouTube
Quote
British environmental photographer’s copyright claim prompts website to remove film that has been condemned by climate scientists
YouTube has taken down the controversial Michael Moore-produced documentary Planet of the Humans in response to a copyright infringement claim by a British environmental photographer.

The movie, which has been condemned as inaccurate and misleading by climate scientists and activists, allegedly includes a clip used without the permission of the owner Toby Smith, who does not approve of the context in which his material is being used.

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2020/may/26/michael-moore-film-planet-of-the-humans-removed-from-youtube

Ken Feldman

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1274
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 118
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4773 on: May 28, 2020, 11:44:12 PM »
US renewables produced more energy than coal in 2019.

https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=43895



Quote
May 28, 2020
U.S. renewable energy consumption surpasses coal for the first time in over 130 years

In 2019, U.S. annual energy consumption from renewable sources exceeded coal consumption for the first time since before 1885, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Monthly Energy Review. This outcome mainly reflects the continued decline in the amount of coal used for electricity generation over the past decade as well as growth in renewable energy, mostly from wind and solar. Compared with 2018, coal consumption in the United States decreased nearly 15%, and total renewable energy consumption grew by 1%.

Quote
Total renewable energy consumption in the United States grew for the fourth year in a row to a record-high 11.5 quadrillion Btu in 2019. Since 2015, the growth in U.S. renewable energy is almost entirely attributable to the use of wind and solar in the electric power sector. In 2019, electricity generation from wind surpassed hydro for the first time and is now the most-used source of renewable energy for electricity generation in the United States on an annual basis.

Quote
Renewable energy is more broadly consumed by every sector in the United States. About 56% of commercially delivered U.S. renewable energy is used in the electric power sector, mostly from wind and hydroelectric power, but different types are also consumed in the industrial (22%), transportation (12%), residential (7%), and commercial (2%) sectors.


kassy

  • Moderator
  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2050
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 1149
  • Likes Given: 806
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4774 on: May 31, 2020, 09:46:35 AM »
Some points from this blog (numbers and bolding mine):

https://www.aweablog.org/fact-check-new-michael-moore-backed-documentary-full-of-errors-fundamentally-misunderstands-electric-system/

1  it’s simply untrue that fossil fuel reserves run around the clock for when the wind doesn’t blow and the sun doesn’t shine, as the documentary falsely claims.

2 At several points in the documentary, filmmakers bizarrely criticize the materials used to build wind turbines and solar panels and claim that emissions generated to build renewable energy projects are greater than the carbon reduction benefits the projects will create.

This is simply false.

The average wind project repays its carbon footprint in less than six months and generates zero carbon electricity for the remainder of its 20 to 30 year lifespan. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory reviewed all published research on this topic and concluded that wind energy’s carbon footprint is a fraction of all fossil fuels’ and even lower than nuclear and most other renewable energy sources. Every study by utilities, independent power system operators, and government entities has found those pollution reductions are as large or larger than expected.

Wind turbines are primarily made of steel and concrete, as the documentary notes, but so is nearly every man-made structure in modern society. Cars, buildings, sidewalks, and countless other structures, not to mention conventional power plants, are also constructed using steel and concrete. Nor do U.S. wind turbines use significant amounts of rare earth materials as the film portrays—over 95 percent of the U.S. wind turbine fleet uses gearboxes rather than direct drive machines, which means rare earths are not used.

3 The film’s claim that wind and solar energy is “not replacing fossil fuels” is  patently false. While 13,703 megawatts (MW) of coal-fired capacity was retired in 2019, more wind power capacity was added to the grid than any other generation technology. Together, wind and solar represent 62 percent of capacity added in 2019. Furthermore, wind energy provided 7.2 percent of the nation’s electricity in 2019, up from a 6.5 percent share in 2018. At the same time electricity generated from coal dropped 15 percent from 2018 levels, continuing its decline in the U.S. electricity market. Wind energy’s share of U.S. electricity generation has more than tripled since 2010 when wind accounted for 2.3 percent of total generation. Iowa and Kansas, for example, now both generate over 40 percent of their electricity using wind, and in both states wind is the largest electricity source.
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

Ken Feldman

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1274
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 118
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4775 on: June 02, 2020, 06:23:53 PM »
China will only approve new wind and solar projects if they are as cheap as coal.  They plan on adding 85 GW of solar and wind this year.  Seems that renewables are as cheap as coal in China now.

https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Chinese-Government-To-Monitor-Renewable-Energy-Targets.html

Quote
Chinese Government To Monitor Renewable Energy Targets
By Irina Slav - Jun 02, 2020

China will begin monitoring how closely provinces stick to clean energy targets set by the central government, Bloomberg reports, citing a statement by the National Development and Reform Commission.

The country has increased its renewable energy generation target for this year to 28.2 percent of the total, with 10.8 percent to come from non-hydropower sources. This would be up by a modest 0.7 percentage points from 2019.

Quote
Interestingly, Beijing plans to boost solar and wind capacity this year, after last year it slashed subsidies for these two renewable energy streams. Beijing had said earlier this year it will only approve new solar and wind power installations if their developers can prove the energy they generate is as cheap as that generated in coal-fired power plants.

Plans to add some 85.1 GW of solar and wind capacity this year suggests costs of solar and wind projects have fallen sufficiently to compete with coal-fired power plants. Of this total, solar will account for 48.45 GW and wind will account for 35.1 GW.

Meanwhile, Chinese solar businesses are struggling with falling prices for their products and services as the pandemic delays and cancels projects around the world. This, according to Bloomberg could result in sector consolidation and a new solar boom once the crisis is over, spurred by the low prices.

Ken Feldman

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1274
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 118
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4776 on: June 02, 2020, 09:36:58 PM »
Chinese companies are set to dominate the market for solar panels in the coming decade.

https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Worlds-Top-Solar-Panel-Producer-Opens-New-Mega-Factory.html

Quote
World’s Top Solar Panel Producer Opens New Mega Factory
By Tom Kool - Jun 01, 2020

Renewables stocks have outperformed the broader energy markets in the last couple of months and, while Covid-19 has disrupted supply chains and caused a temporary dip in solar installations, the mid-and-long-term outlook for the sector as a whole remains bright.

This is especially true in China, where Jinko Solar, the world’s largest solar panel manufacturer has just started operations at the first phase of a $1.6 billion factory in the Zhejiang province. The total capacity of this new factory is estimated at 16GW of panels per year, effectively doubling the total production capacity of the solar giant.

Quote
Bloomberg research shows that costs for the abovementioned components such as wafers, cells and complete panels have fallen by as much as 20 percent, mentioning that prices of these manufactured products could be set to fall further in recent months as new mega-factories such as Jinko Solar’s latest venture are set to add to supply.

Quote
This decade, prices for PV solar panels and components are expected to fall further as Chinese manufacturers have announced huge expansion plans. Tongwei solar announced in February that it would push ahead with plans to construct a 30GW solar cell manufacturing hub in Chengdu, while its peer GCL System Integration has announced the construction of a 60GW mega facility, a move that would make it the world’s largest solar panel maker. GCL’s megaproject, when completed, would supply about half of total global demand for solar panels.

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 17604
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 822
  • Likes Given: 299
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4777 on: June 04, 2020, 10:04:30 PM »
Tesla's Big Battery In Hornsdale Earned Back Its Cost In 2 Years, Highlighting Why Renewables Are Beating Coal
June 04, 2020
Quote
Tesla's big battery in Hornsdale has managed to earn back its construction cost in just a little over two years, highlighting once more that renewables are on their way towards beating coal-fired power plants. With such an achievement under its belt, the Tesla Powerpack farm in South Australia remains as one of the premier examples of how renewables could be used as viable alternatives to fossil fuels.

Last month, Neoen, the French owner and operator of the Tesla big battery, stated that the system has recorded a fivefold increase in revenue in the first quarter. This was due to a set of circumstances that are rather unique and next to impossible to repeat. Among this involved a tornado that cut the transmission link between Victoria and South Australia in late January.

During the incident, the Hornsdale Power Reserve, which is still considered as the largest operational battery installation in the world, was deployed to serve a critical role in managing system security in South Australia. The region was forced to operate as an energy island for almost three weeks, but the Tesla Powerwpack farm, as well as two other battery installations, ultimately helped keep the region's grid safe and stable.

This intervention resulted in a spike in revenue for the Hornsdale Power Reserve to about €21.6 million ($AU36.2 million) in Q1 2020, a far cry from the €4.2 million that the system earned during the first quarter of 2019. So significant was the Tesla big battery's revenue in Q1 2020 that it actually exceeded the facility's earnings for all of 2019. ...
https://www.tesmanian.com/blogs/tesmanian-blog/tesla-big-battery-hornsdale-roi-2-two-years
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

BeeKnees

  • Frazil ice
  • Posts: 155
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 36
  • Likes Given: 55
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4778 on: June 05, 2020, 12:26:07 PM »
Interesting day for the UK.  Sunny and windy means fossil fuels not getting much of a look in.

It feels like we are getting close to the point where renewable sources start to exceed demand and make storage other than existing pumped hydro viable.

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 17604
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 822
  • Likes Given: 299
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4779 on: June 05, 2020, 07:43:06 PM »
Interesting day for the UK.  Sunny and windy means fossil fuels not getting much of a look in.

It feels like we are getting close to the point where renewable sources start to exceed demand and make storage other than existing pumped hydro viable.

 :)
Quote
Coal - GB Grid (@UK_Coal) 6/5/20, 1:02 PM
GB Grid: #Coal is generating 0.00GW (0.00%) out of 29.57GW
Continuous time without coal: 56 days 18 hours
https://twitter.com/uk_coal/status/1268951239729037313
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

rboyd

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1330
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 249
  • Likes Given: 52
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4780 on: June 05, 2020, 10:09:21 PM »
Helped by UK overall electricity consumption falling by 10% in in the last decade. Also, most recently of course the COVID shutdown effect (also, the lower daily afternoon peaks allied with sunnier weather gives solar a bigger percentage share).

Quote
Overall, electricity demand has fallen by 9% in the UK in the past seven years, the sharpest decline in the union. Meanwhile, Poland chalked up the biggest rise, at 9% over the same period.

Quote
Simon Evans, the policy editor at analysts CarbonBrief, said: “This is one of the least-reported and most significant stories in the UK power sector. Since 2005, the UK has saved the equivalent of two-and-a-half Hinkley Point Cs [a nuclear power station], a trend that started several years before the financial crisis.”

Quote
The growing disparity between the UK and EU has puzzled experts. The gap cannot be explained away solely by shrinking industrial production in Britain or slower economic growth in 2017, of 1.8% versus a forecast of 2.3% for the EU.

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/jan/30/uk-electricity-use-falling-economy-weather

https://www.frontier-economics.com/uk/en/news-and-articles/articles/article-i7214-how-is-covid-19-impacting-the-uk-electricity-system/

kassy

  • Moderator
  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2050
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 1149
  • Likes Given: 806
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4781 on: June 10, 2020, 02:19:22 PM »
At the same time Drax, the country's biggest power plant, has been taking a different path to renewable energy.

The plant, which is also in Yorkshire, generates 5% of the country's electricity.

A decade ago, it was the biggest consumer of coal in the UK but has been switching to compressed wood pellets.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-52973089

Of course we need to get rid of the wood pellets too...
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

ArcticMelt2

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 722
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 147
  • Likes Given: 32
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4782 on: June 13, 2020, 09:57:30 PM »
https://www.irena.org/-/media/Files/IRENA/Agency/Publication/2020/Mar/IRENA_RE_Capacity_Highlights_2020.pdf

Quote
At the end of 2019, global renewable generation capacity amounted to 2 537 GW. Hydropower accounted for the largest share of the global total, with a capacity of 1 190 GW.*
Wind and solar energy accounted for most of the remainder, with capacities of 623 GW and 586 GW respectively. Other renewables included 124 GW of bioenergy and 14 GW of geothermal, plus 500 MW of marine energy.

rboyd

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1330
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 249
  • Likes Given: 52
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4783 on: June 14, 2020, 11:14:22 PM »
Further analysis of the IRENA numbers for 2019:

https://www.irena.org/publications/2020/Mar/Renewable-Capacity-Statistics-2020

The yearly compound growth rate in global overall renewables capacity has been falling year over year since 2015, with 2019 signifying a new low. The growth is also more oriented to the lower capacity utilization sectors - exacerbating the effect of the declining capacity growth rate on the growth in renewables generation.

Wind and solar are now about 9% of global electricity generation, at their combined capacity doubling rate of about 15% (doubling every 5 years) they will not fully offset the trend growth in overall electricity generation - i.e. more fossil fuel capacity will be utilized (either new capacity or higher utilization of current capacity) - until the second half of the 2020s (if the solar growth rate does not decelerate further).

Nothing in the industry-level (GWEC and Solar Power Europe) forecasts, which have proven pretty accurate for the past few years, see a change in this in the next few years.

- The compound growth rate of installed capacity for all renewables fell to 7.45% in 2019 from 8.18% in 2018 (and 9% in 2015); doubling rate of approx. 10 years.

- Hydro growth was 1.67% vs 1.72% the year before (and 3.45% in 2015). Hydro is the renewable with the highest capacity utilization rate of the renewables, except for bio-energy

- Wind growth rose slightly to 10.44% from 9.61% the previous year (and 18.58% in 2015); doubling rate of approx. 7 years.

- Solar growth was 19.99% vs. 25.7% the previous year (and 25.07% in 2015); doubling rate of approx. 3.5 years.

- Bio-energy growth was 5.15% vs 6.48% the previous year (and 6.79% in 2015).
« Last Edit: June 14, 2020, 11:21:29 PM by rboyd »

rboyd

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1330
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 249
  • Likes Given: 52
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4784 on: June 14, 2020, 11:31:06 PM »
Trump admin slaps solar, wind operators with retroactive rent bills

Nothing like retroactive charges to reduce the readiness of companies to invest in renewables!

Quote
The Trump administration has ended a two-year rent holiday for solar and wind projects operating on federal lands, handing them whopping retroactive bills at a time the industry is struggling with the fallout of the coronavirus outbreak, according to company officials

Quote
The move represents a multi-million-dollar hit to an industry that has already seen installation projects canceled or delayed by the global health crisis, which has cut investment and dimmed the demand outlook for power.

It also clashes with broader government efforts in the United States to shield companies from the worst of the economic turmoil through federal loans, waived fees, tax breaks and trimmed regulatory enforcement.

Bankers and big oil get financial support during COVID, renewables get extra bills!

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-interior-renewables/trump-admin-slaps-solar-wind-operators-with-retroactive-rent-bills-idUSKBN22U0FW

Simon

  • New ice
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 7
  • Likes Given: 32
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4785 on: June 15, 2020, 08:00:35 AM »
I would like to see a massive and rapid expansion of solar PV installation, worldwide preferably 20 000km2 each year for next twenty years. Plenty of sunny desert available. Install a million offshore wind turbines and the carbon emissions from energy use becomes completely resolved.

nanning

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2055
  • 0Kg CO₂, 37 KWh/wk,125L H₂O/wk, No offspring
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 311
  • Likes Given: 16657
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4786 on: June 15, 2020, 08:48:17 AM »
Simon, someone has to wipe the sand and dust of the panels. Infrastructure has to be build, often across borders. There will be lots of FF emissions (GHG and other) in building, transporting and installing the solar panels and building the infrastructure.

I would like to see humans using much LESS ENERGY. Then far fewer solar panels and wind turbines are needed.
Let's cap personal electrical energy use at max. 10 KWh/day * 365 days = 3650 KWh/year = 3.65 MWh per year.

To make it fair to personal electric car owners, FF personal transport fuel will have to be calculated in KWh and falls under the same cap. Yes a car uses an enormous amount of energy. This is a great incentive to be less lazy and to stop surrounding yourself with high-energy-use comforts and ease.

But of course, to people who are addicted consumers this is impossible to contemplate. Yet not so long ago ...
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

oren

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5540
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 1721
  • Likes Given: 1609
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4787 on: June 15, 2020, 11:21:30 AM »
I would like to see humans using much LESS ENERGY. I would like to see a massive and rapid expansion of solar PV installation.
Of the two things I would like to see happening, I believe the second has a higher probability of occurring sooner on a scale that matters. This is regardless of my personal tendencies as an addicted consumer or an enlightened environmentalist.

Tom_Mazanec

  • Young ice
  • Posts: 3039
    • View Profile
    • Planet Mazanec
  • Liked: 571
  • Likes Given: 176
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4788 on: June 15, 2020, 12:29:18 PM »
nanning, if my math is right you consume about half the energy of your proposed limit.
SHARKS (CROSSED OUT) MONGEESE (SIC) WITH FRICKIN LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

KiwiGriff

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 707
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 401
  • Likes Given: 112
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4789 on: June 15, 2020, 02:59:25 PM »
In 2006 I installed solar on my live aboard boat.
Cost  $1600nz for 80 Watts of panels.
In 2016 I purchased my present array.
Cost $1600nz for 2,000 Watts.
If I was to get panels today that $1600nz would get me 2,400 Watts.
At some point storage and solar  will  be cheaper than grid connect for almost all.
This will be less than a decade away for most of us.
God parity .
Watch this to the end.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3242&v=O-kbzfWzvSI&feature=emb_logo


Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 17604
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 822
  • Likes Given: 299
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4790 on: June 15, 2020, 03:24:07 PM »
.
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

gerontocrat

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 8445
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 3185
  • Likes Given: 25
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4791 on: June 15, 2020, 05:19:46 PM »

I would like to see humans using much LESS ENERGY. Then far fewer solar panels and wind turbines are needed.

But of course, to people who are addicted consumers this is impossible to contemplate. Yet not so long ago ...
As lockdowns are gradually abandoned will all of us go back to the way we were? Perhaps not..

- some will be cautious. The savings rate in the US of A went to a record high a month or so ago. It seems those with money coming in spent less partly because they couldn't, but also partly as a conscious decision to save.
- will some people have realised that a lot of what they regarded before covid as "must-haves" are not?

Temporary? Or will most of us once gain jump onto the bus to oblivion?
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

KiwiGriff

  • Grease ice
  • Posts: 707
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 401
  • Likes Given: 112
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4792 on: June 15, 2020, 08:31:45 PM »
Temporary? Or will most of us once gain jump onto the bus to oblivion?
Most of us are oblivious.

Not every one will return to pre Covid habits.
What I think will happen is we will see a small decrease in rampant consumerism once the virus has run its course .
Some will look towards cleaner transport after seeing the horizon for the first time,  more will continue to work from home saving time, money and fossil fuel use, some will realize endlessly buying tat on credit is not such a good idea.

So a net good result for AGW but not the extreme change in lifestyle those who are climate aware know we need .

Ken Feldman

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1274
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 118
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4793 on: June 15, 2020, 08:35:14 PM »
As the price of solar has fallen, more solar panel manufacturing capacity is being built.  This will increase the installation of new solar farms in the 2020s exponentially. 

For example, Adani Green Energy in India has won a contract to increase its manufacturing capacity by 8GW in 2GW phases.  As part of the first phase, it will also install a new 2 GW solar farm.

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/06/10/india-targets-lofty-climate-goals-with-6-billion-deal-to-boost-solar.html

Quote
Indian firm to invest $6 billion in solar power as country targets lofty renewable energy goals
Published Wed, Jun 10 2020

India’s Adani Green Energy Limited (AGEL) has won a major contract which will see the firm develop 8 gigawatts (GW) of solar power over the next few years, as authorities in the country look to ramp up capacity to meet ambitious renewable energy targets.

Announced on Tuesday, the $6 billion manufacturing-linked agreement between AGEL and the Solar Energy Corporation of India (SECI) will see AGEL set up 2 GW of what it described as “solar cell and module manufacturing capacity.”

Quote
In terms of the manufacturing facilities, Adani said that these would be set up by the year 2022. They will supplement a current production capacity of 1.3 GW and represent the latest example of India attempting to boost its domestic manufacturing capabilities.

Ken Feldman

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1274
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 118
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4794 on: June 15, 2020, 08:43:21 PM »
JinkoSolar, a large Chinese solar panel manufacturer, increased production by 12% over last year, despite the Covid related shutdowns.

https://www.pv-magazine.com/2020/06/15/another-billion-dollar-quarter-for-jinkosolar/

Quote
Another billion-dollar quarter for JinkoSolar

Despite the challenges to both the manufacturing and shipment of its products during the period, JinkoSolar today reported that it shipped 3.4 GW of modules in the first quarter of 2020, bringing its revenue for the quarter just over the billion dollar mark.
June 15, 2020 Mark Hutchins

JinkoSolar reported little slowdown in its business during the first quarter of 2020, shipping 3.4 GW of modules during the period and bringing in $1.2 billion in total revenue. Accordingly, the company is leaving its full-year 2020 shipments guidance untouched at 18-20 GW.

Quote
These figures represent a 24.8% decrease in shipments compared to the previous quarter, but still 12.3% ahead of Q1 2019. Further, the company says that while it predicts the overall market will shrink by around 25% in 2020 compared to last year, it does not expect its own business to be affected. “…we see a number of growth opportunities in the near-term as the market consolidates,” said JinkoSolar CEO Kangping Chen. “Smaller, less-competitive manufacturers will gradually exit the market, leaving more opportunities for a few key players to expand their market share worldwide.”

Quote
For the rest of this year, Jinko says it expects further challenges arising from the pandemic and is coordinating its manufacturing, logistics, and sales to meet these. For the second quarter of this year, Jinko forecast’s a higher level of shipments at 4.2-4.5 GW, and a similar revenue at $1.1-1.18 billion – reflecting an expected drop in prices for materials across the supply chain.

Quote
On the technology side, the company further noted that as of April it has completed the ramp-up of its new monocrystalline wafer capacity, bringing its total production capacities to 17.5 GW for mono wafer, 10.6 GW for cells (9.8 GW PERC cells and 800 MW devoted to n-type technology) and 16 GW for modules.

Sigmetnow

  • Multi-year ice
  • Posts: 17604
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 822
  • Likes Given: 299
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4795 on: June 16, 2020, 02:57:19 PM »
Working from home. Kids continuing their COVID-necessitated homework.  Refrigerator preventing the family’s food spoilage. And charging the electric cars.  It is possible to be a valuable contributor to society without sucking a lot of energy from the grid.  In fact, you can help others by adding more to the grid than you take from it.

Quote
When grid power went down that morning, our rooftop solar system was already at 5.9kW, far more power than our home was consuming (600 watts). As a result, nothing changed. Our home continued to be powered by the rooftop solar system, with the 5.3kW of excess power still getting pushed to the Powerwalls.

The morning outage only lasted 24 minutes, with another 16 minute outage later in the afternoon. As uneventful as it may sound, the exciting part is exactly how uneventful it was. I was able to continue working without losing internet connectivity or power to any of my devices. On the other side of the house, our two boys were able to continue their COVID-induced remote schoolwork. We didn’t have to reset any clocks or worry about our refrigerated goods spoiling.

It’s not the most interesting story and that is exactly the beauty of the system. When paired with an appropriately sized solar system, a home energy storage unit enables life to continue unaffected in the face of power outages big or small. If the outage would have lasted hours or even a few days, the situation wouldn’t have changed all too much. We would pay a bit more attention to when we charge our vehicles, run the electric dryer, oven, and heat pump, but life would continue largely unaffected. …
https://cleantechnica.com/2020/06/16/the-tesla-powerwall-saves-the-day-in-sce-power-outage/amp/
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Bruce Steele

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1747
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 413
  • Likes Given: 15
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4796 on: June 16, 2020, 05:54:58 PM »
Sigmetnow, There was a 600 acre brushfire that started right after we had a power outage last weekend. The powerwalls kicked in right away and clocks didn’t need resetting or warning lights for power outage on freezers didn’t notice any surge. We had power for our water and I set up hoses to fight the fire but luckily it stayed a mile away.
 We were putting power into the powerwalls because the solar was producing more than we were using.
I did turn off the air conditioner and waited to do laundry but the system worked perfectly and we had power to spare. The outage was during daylight hours but I wanted the powerwall full in case the power outage went into the night , but it didn’t. At 86% I could have easily gotten through a couple days or really a couple weeks.
 

nanning

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 2055
  • 0Kg CO₂, 37 KWh/wk,125L H₂O/wk, No offspring
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 311
  • Likes Given: 16657
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4797 on: June 17, 2020, 04:13:15 AM »
That's great Bruce. Now you know it works as you wished it would. A good test. Congrats.

I see a future additional rift/inequality in society emerging: Between those who own a house and can install renewable energy systems to be able to have electricity when the grid goes down (which will happen more and more when civilisation collapses further), and those, like me, who rent a house and have no such options and will be without electricity without the grid. No fridge, cooking, Internet etc.

Today I've read a local news article that our provincial government is going to subsidise house owners with 5 million euro's. To upgrade their houses with solar panels and insulation. I'd like to have a couple of solar panels on my balcony or on the roof of our building. I feel left out and vulnerable.
Globally, house owners are a minority I think. The much richer minority.
"It is preoccupation with possessions, more than anything else, that prevents us from living freely and nobly" - Bertrand Russell
"It is preoccupation with what other people from your groups think of you, that prevents you from living freely and nobly" - Nanning
Why do you keep accumulating stuff?

Bruce Steele

  • Nilas ice
  • Posts: 1747
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 413
  • Likes Given: 15
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4798 on: June 17, 2020, 05:14:19 AM »
Nanning , In the end the land will either be tended or not. The garden is as close to renewable as anything I do, the solar makes that job easier. Batteries kicked in to keep my water system working as a fire approached . Batteries make my electric wheelhoe an efficient tool for cultivation. The solar enables both comfort as well as work. I would like to stress that solar enables a fossil free garden .
Plenty of hand work included.
 Here is the garden.

https://imgur.com/gallery/NtT8Xp8
via Imgur for iOS

I do think solar electric is important as a way to take some work out of feeding yourself and feeding yourself is a chore whether you are rich or poor. There is so much importance  placed upon transportation but if you are good enough at feeding yourself you don’t need to go anywhere very often.






« Last Edit: June 17, 2020, 05:52:27 AM by Bruce Steele »

sidd

  • First-year ice
  • Posts: 5524
    • View Profile
  • Liked: 737
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #4799 on: June 17, 2020, 07:18:35 AM »
Re: future rift

It is not in the future, here already. But perhaps better discussed in the "economic inequality" or other thread.

sidd