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Andreas T

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5500 on: February 18, 2021, 10:56:46 PM »
The graph shows of course that there is a huge increase in non carbon energy required but there is the issue of how numbers compare.
In UK coal, gas and nuclear are reported on "primary energy basis" that means calorific value i.e. heat generated. (which does not make a lot of sense for nuclear which is solely used to generate electricity at efficiencies of less than 40% but that is a historical legacy I guess) so in electricity generation or with heat pumps the thin line of green replaces almost three times as much of the non renewables (and biofuels) in transportation even more.

Sciguy

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5501 on: February 19, 2021, 12:30:41 AM »
The graph upthread is based on the UN Emissions Gap Report for 2020, published last December.  Although it acknowledges recent changes to the US and China stated policies, it doesn't include those changes in the graphs as those countries (and others that offered improved goals) haven't filed the appropriate paperwork with the UNFCC to be considered official NDCs and therefore the 2015 NDCs are graphed instead.

https://www.unep.org/emissions-gap-report-2020

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The growing number of countries that are committing to net-zero emissions goals by around mid-century is the most significant and encouraging climate policy development of 2020. To remain feasible and credible, it is imperative that these commitments are urgently translated into strong near-term policies and action, and are reflected in the NDCs.

The report goes on to describe the updated goals of the USA (net zero by 2050), China (2060), the EU, Korea, Japan, Canada, South Africa, Argentina and Mexico.  However, they haven't filed their paperwork.

Quote
There has been limited progress of G20 members in  terms  of  providing  formal  submissions  to  the  UNFCCC  by  2020  of  mid-century,  long-term  low GHG  emission  development  strategies  and  new  or  updated  NDCs.  As  at  mid-November  2020, nine  G20  members  (Canada,  the  European  Union, France, Germany, Japan, Mexico, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States of America) have  submitted  long-term  low  GHG  development strategies  to  the  UNFCCC,  all  of  which  were submitted  before  net-zero  emissions  goals  were adopted. No G20 member has officially submitted a new or updated NDC target.

So the graphs, and much of the information in the UN Emissions Gap Report, don't reflect the current policies of the major emitters.

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5502 on: February 19, 2021, 03:08:42 AM »
Surprisingly Texas has little grid level solar at this time. So little that it barely registers on graphs. This year a surge of utility level solar projects are scheduled with the largest share in Texas. These projects would not of helped this crisis much but would probably help them to recover faster as little permeant damage would have been done to solar unlike fossil fuel plants. Snow does not last long there. The expansion of residential solar and battery power most certainly will help and I expect Texas solar installers will be busy this year.


While the disinformation about renewable energy is disheartening remember it is a sign of how threatened fossil fuels are.

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5503 on: February 19, 2021, 03:29:07 AM »
I was going to post more information from EIA about the Texas power grid but access has been disabled. My initial instinct is to blame it on EIA hiding data because the EIA is still led by a Trump FF appointee. Until Bidens DOE secretary is approved by congress I doubt that will change. Since it is an automated system I doubt it has anything to do with the crisis itself. I hope we can be rid of him soon. I tire of having data shuffled around or become missing for no reason.

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5504 on: February 19, 2021, 04:42:46 AM »
eia data back online

vox_mundi

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5505 on: February 20, 2021, 11:40:10 PM »
From No Power to Unaffordable Power: Texas Households Receive Electric Bills as High as $10,000 Due to Snowstorm
https://www.theroot.com/from-no-power-to-unaffordable-power-texas-households-r-1846316158/amp

As the Texas power grid collapsed under a historic winter storm, Jose Del Rio of Haltom City, in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, saw the electricity bill on a vacant two-bedroom home he is trying to sell slowly creep up over the past two weeks. Typically, the bill is around $125 to $150 a month, he said. But his account has already been charged about $630 this month — and he still owes another $2,600.

... ”There is no one living in that house. All the lights are off. But I have the heat at 60°F because I don’t want the pipes to freeze.”

When he contacted Griddy, his electric company, they advised him to switch providers, Del Rio said.

Griddy’s prices are controlled by the market, and are therefore vulnerable to sudden swings in demand. With the extreme weather, energy usage has soared, pushing up wholesale power prices to more than $9,000 per megawatt hour — compared to the seasonal average of $50 per megawatt hour.

In the face of the soaring costs, Griddy has been directing consumers to consider temporarily switching electricity providers to save on their bills.

https://www.griddy.com/post/how-to-switch

... When your electric company tells you to switch but there has been a hold on switching for over  a week now. Using as little as possible 1300 sq ft house and this is my bill. . How is this fair. I only paid $1200 for the whole 2020 year 



https://mobile.twitter.com/katandtonyT/status/1362460057447849987

... According to The Hill, one Dallas resident told reporters that he usually pays around $660 in electric bills for his home, guest house and office, but he said his latest power bills exceeded $17,000 due to the storm. Another Dallas family said they saw the electric bill for their three-bedroom house reach close to $10,000 over the span of a few days.

https://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/539693-texas-households-face-massive-electricity-bills-some-as-high-as-17k

It’s unclear if Texas laws that protect residents from utility companies that exploit natural disasters for profit extend to folks who are receiving these ridiculously high electric bills due to the recent storm.

------------------------------------------

https://www.theverge.com/2021/2/19/22291426/texas-blackouts-utility-bills-electricity-cost-energy-insecurity

The “heat or eat” dilemma was already a problem before the freeze arrived: 29 percent of residents surveyed by Texas Energy Poverty Research Institute (TEPRI) said they delayed or skipped spending on food in order to pay for energy bills.

Low-income households in Texas already spend about 10 percent of their incomes, on average, on energy, according to TEPRI. That’s compared to 2 percent for homes with higher incomes. Anything above 6 percent is already considered unaffordable, according to the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy.

And this isn’t limited to Texas. Prior to the pandemic, 1 in 3 households in the US struggled to pay their energy bills, according to the US Energy Information Administration.

-----------------------------------------

... coulda bought a Tesla Powerwall for that ...

... Tesla lists the Powerwall at a cost of $7,000 alone, and puts supporting hardware costs at $1,000, bringing the price of just the Powerwall and its associated components to $8,000 before installation.  As a rough estimate, you can expect the Tesla Powerwall to cost between $9,600 and $15,600 for a full system installation (before incentives). That number includes the battery, an inverter, various other equipment costs, and estimated installation costs.

If you want to install the Powerwall as part of a solar-plus-storage system, battery costs are just one part of the equation. A 5 kilowatt (kW) solar energy system costs anywhere from $9,000 to $15,000 depending on where you live and the type of equipment you choose.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2021, 01:05:16 AM by vox_mundi »
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5506 on: February 21, 2021, 03:49:40 AM »
In most US markets retail rates are set annually based on lasts years costs and anticipated changes. Spikes in the wholesale market like these were passed on to California customers though not in real time. In California these spikes were largely caused by wholesale market traders manipulating those markets in collaboration with power plant operators. Rule changes ended the practice. Retail prices were not increased to pay the full cost. Utilities responded by deferring maintenance. Deferred maintenance was a contributing factor in some California wildfires.


It is bad enough that Texans have to suffer through the lightly regulated reserve and resiliency requirements but to expect customers to pony up for the market failures is just adding insult to injury. Next time someone argues about the cost of regulations remind them the costs of not regulating can be far greater.

gerontocrat

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5507 on: February 21, 2021, 11:17:37 AM »
India - The Elephant in the Room


The IEA has just produced a report - https://www.iea.org/reports/india-energy-outlook-2021

This their conclusion
Quote
More than that of any other major economy, India’s energy future depends on buildings and factories yet to be built, and vehicles and appliances yet to be bought. Within 20 years, the majority of India’s emissions in the STEPS come from power plants, industrial facilities, buildings and vehicles that do not exist today. This represents a huge opening for policies to steer India onto a more secure and sustainable course.

India’s ambitious renewables targets are already acting as a catalyst for the transformation of its power sector. A crucial – and even more challenging – task ahead is to put the industrial sector on a similarly new path through more widespread electrification, material and energy efficiency, technologies such as CCUS, and a switch to progressively lower-carbon fuels. Electrification, efficiency and fuel switching are also the main tools for the transport sector, alongside a determined move to build more sustainable transport infrastructure and shift more freight onto India’s soon-to-be-electrified railways. These transformations require innovation, partnerships and capital. The additional capital required for clean energy technologies to 2040 in the Sustainable Development Scenario is $1.4 trillion above the level in the STEPS. But the benefits are huge, including savings of the same magnitude on oil import bills. Government policies to accelerate India’s clean energy transition can lay the foundation for lasting prosperity and greater energy security. The stakes could not be higher, for India and for the world.

It seems on current stated polices India's CO2 emissions will keep on rising at least until 2040.
With a huge drive to renewables + energy efficiency, CO2 emissions could have peaked in 2019. I guess reality is likely to be somewhere inbetween

I attach some graphs from the report.  Click images to enlarge
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Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5508 on: February 21, 2021, 05:07:04 PM »
Why wind turbines thrive in Antarctica and places way colder than Texas
https://mashable.com/article/wind-turbines-texas/
Ice-coated blades are difficult and dangerous to spin. Solutions include water-repellent coatings, electrically heated blades or warm air circulation.   Interior gears and motors can also freeze up from ice in cold, humid air.  The energy needed to keep a wind turbine ice-free is a small fraction of its output.

—-
El Paso, Texas winterized their power plants, and are part of the multi-state Western Interconnection grid, which pays them for any excess energy they generate.
El Paso Heeded the Warnings and Avoided a Winter Catastrophe
The West Texas city was spared the worst effects of this week’s storms, thanks to its preparations in the wake of a devastating 2011 deep freeze.
https://www.texasmonthly.com/news/el-paso-electric-winter-storm-2021/
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sciguy

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5509 on: February 22, 2021, 06:58:39 PM »
Texans may opt to put solar panels on their roofs and batteries in their garages rather than paying ERCOT for electricity.

https://qz.com/1975311/texas-solar-panels-set-to-take-off-after-grid-collapse/

Quote
The collapse of its energy grid may make Texas the next solar hot spot
By Michael J. Coren

February 21, 2021

Texas rooftops plastered with solar panels in 2021, and maybe a battery in the garage, may become more common after one of the worst winter storms in Texas history.  The one-two punch of soaring electricity prices and massive outages following the collapse of the power system after the Feb. 15 storm is likely to be a turning point for the solar industry in the Lone Star State.



Quote
Those skyrocketing prices for Griddy customers are only the beginning. The state will now need to spend billions of dollars hardening its infrastructure against extreme weather, which is expected to worsen as climate change advances. Although Texan’s deregulated energy market leaves much up to businesses, like every state, policymakers are now under pressure to prevent another such catastrophe from the next polar plunge, or blistering heatwave. Over the next five years, the state will have to make enormous new infrastructure expenditures, a cost ultimately ending up on utility bills. Ratepayers will be on the hook.

Something similar happened in Australia, where ratepayers revolted when hit with skyrocketing bills. Retail electricity prices in Australia have nearly doubled since 2005 to help pay for upgrades to aging infrastructure. Combined with incentives and falling solar prices, residential solar installations have taken off. The country has the highest rate of home solar adoption of any major economy: at least one in four Australian homes have rooftop solar panels, something true in conservative Queensland as well as left-leaning Sydney. The systems typically pay for themselves in a few years. One homeowner interviewed by the New York Times said after installing a $3,000 solar panel system, his monthly $190 utility bill turned into a $30 credit (thanks to the utility paying for excess electricity).

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5510 on: February 23, 2021, 03:53:52 PM »



[size=2rem]BloombergNEF expects up to 209 GW of new solar for this year

[/size][size=1rem]A new report from the U.S.-based analyst predicts that new PV additions for 2021 may range from 163 to 221 GW next year and from 179 to 240 GW in 2023. According to BloombergNEF, the current supply bottlenecks for glass and polysilicon will unlikely halt the global PV market.[/size]
[/size][size=2rem]
[/color][/size]https://www.pv-magazine.com/2021/02/23/bloombergnef-expects-up-to-209-gw-of-new-solar-for-this-year/[size=2rem][/color]

Bruce Steele

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5511 on: February 23, 2021, 05:57:16 PM »
SciGuy, The gridley power Bill is for 1,638 kWh used in 18 days. My same energy use was 290kWh and with Solar producing 500 kWh and two powerwalls I have 185kWh put unto the grid over that same 18 day period.  OK Calif. not Texas but 1,638 kWh is more than I use in four months and no home solar or powerwall combo will fix the usage problem this homeowner has. Gotta run on way less electricity.

gerontocrat

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5512 on: February 23, 2021, 06:49:38 PM »
Monthly update from the US EIA @ https://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/

Mostly data to Nov 20. Images are all 12 month moving average.

The first image is wind+solar - steady increase and the curve does gradually steepen.

The second graph is primary energy consumption. Coal continues its decline, and post-Covid demand increase is not there yet.

The third shows electricity generation by fuel type. There is a genuine chance that within 2 years electricity GENERATED from coal will be less than from Solar+Wind.

The last graph shows that vast quantities of energy are wasted by producing electricity from coal and natural gas. So even when electricity generated from coal is less than the useful energy from solar+wind, energy consumed from burning coal will still be far higher than the useful energy from solar+wind.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2021, 07:20:34 PM by gerontocrat »
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Sciguy

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5513 on: February 23, 2021, 08:26:04 PM »
^^^
Thanks for providing the updated charts.  The one showing the amount of primary energy wasted by coal and natural gas generation is especially enligtening.

Sciguy

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5514 on: February 23, 2021, 09:28:58 PM »
The impact of renewables being cheaper than fossil fuels is finally showing up in the capacity installation summaries.

https://theweek.com/articles/967613/boom-green-energy

Quote
The boom in 'green' energy
The Week Staff

February 21, 2021

Climate change and falling prices are driving a revolution in solar, wind, and other renewables. Here's everything you need to know:

Can renewables replace fossil fuels?
Renewable energy sources like solar, wind, and hydroelectricity are already overtaking fossil fuels as the dominant means of power generation in some parts of the developed world. In 2019, 72 percent of power plant additions utilized renewables, according to the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). For the first time, the European Union generated more electricity (38 percent) from renewables in 2020 than from fossil fuels (37 percent). The U.S. still relies heavily upon oil (37 percent), natural gas (32 percent), and coal (11 percent), but the country is on pace this year to generate more energy from renewables than from coal. Overall, renewables now account for roughly 11 percent of U.S. energy production — with about a quarter of that derived from wind power, two-fifths from biofuels and hydroelectricity, and a 10th from solar. Rapid growth in renewables is underway: In 2020, electricity producers installed 37 gigawatts of new solar and wind capacity, shattering the record of 17 GWs from 2016. "The grid is changing so much faster than anyone expected," said Daniel Cohan, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Rice University.

Quote
What's driving the transformation?
Cost-effectiveness. Solar panel producers have steadily achieved greater efficiencies in manufacturing and in generating more power from each individual solar cell. This has led to vast reductions in price, so that solar and wind power now have surpassed coal — and even natural gas — as the cheapest forms of power generation. While the price of coal power largely remained the same from 2009 to 2019, the price of solar power fell by 89 percent and onshore wind power by 70 percent, according to Lazard. The U.K., Norway, and other countries now generate a large share of their electricity from offshore wind farms, and that potential also exists for the U.S., with seven states now studying how to set up arrays. "Right now, the economics of burning coal just don't make sense," said Joe Daniel, who monitors the power sector for the Union of Concerned Scientists. The boom in renewables has another economic benefit: It has created hundreds of thousands of jobs: About 446,000 Americans worked in the solar and wind industries as of 2019 — more than double the 211,000 in coal mining and other methods of fossil-fuel extraction.

Sciguy

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5515 on: February 23, 2021, 11:30:55 PM »
Investors are forecast to fund renewable energy projects in India with a value of $500 billion by 2030.

https://www.moneycontrol.com/news/business/economy/india-to-see-500-billion-investment-in-renewables-by-2030-ieefa-report-6516721.html

Quote
India to see $500-billion investment in renewables by 2030: IEEFA report
A report by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) says that a huge global capital pool is mobilising to invest in renewable energy and grid projects in India
Shine Jacob
February 16, 2021

India is set to see investments to the tune of around $500 billion in the renewables sector if the country has to achieve the target of 450 gigawatts (GW) of capacity by 2030, said a report by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA).

Quote
The country’s untapped renewable potential at 900 gigawatt (GW) is the most in the world. It is estimated that India’s peak power demand will rise to 295GW by 2021-22 and 690GW by 2035.

BeeKnees

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5516 on: February 24, 2021, 08:09:45 PM »
Sadly this will give fuel to those opposed to renewables.

https://reports.electricinsights.co.uk/q4-2020/record-wind-output-and-curtailment/


UK wind generated a record amount of energy in 2020.  BUT network outages on the western HVDC, lower than expected demand and congestion on the network caused 3.8TWh to be curtailed.

Quote
Between 2015 and 2019, curtailment costs rose in line with wind output from £90 to £145 million per year. This cost doubled in 2020 though, as National Grid ESO faced a bill of £282 million – around £10 per household. Put another way, curtailment costs added £4 to each MWh of wind energy generated. While this pushes up the whole-system cost of generation, wind is still likely to give lower bills than a system dominated by fossil fuels and nuclear, as its construction costs have come down so far.

« Last Edit: February 24, 2021, 09:01:00 PM by BeeKnees »

Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5517 on: February 24, 2021, 09:53:08 PM »
February 21, 2021
Tesla PG&E Megapack 182.5 MW Battery Storage Installation Makes Stunning Progress
Quote
In July 2020, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and Tesla began construction of a 182.5-megawatt (MW) lithium-ion battery energy storage system (BESS) at PG&E’s electric substation in Moss Landing in Monterey County [California]. The first Tesla Megapack was installed in early October, marking the start of construction on one of the world's largest lithium-ion energy storage systems. At the moment, the construction is going according to plan, and the installation of all Megapacks has already been completed.

The system is designed, built, and maintained by PG&E and Tesla, and will be owned by PG&E. PG&E aims to launch the system in Q1 2021 and fully operationalize it in Q2 2021. …
https://www.tesmanian.com/blogs/tesmanian-blog/tesla-pg-e-megapack-182-5-mw-battery-storage-installation-makes-stunning-progress
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5518 on: February 25, 2021, 02:34:07 AM »
EIA electricity numbers for December 2020 came out today. The only significant difference between hourly generation numbers I have been using to estimate monthly numbers are the hourly numbers do not report the minor category's like landfill gas. The only noticeable discrepancy in the chart between estimate and official numbers is solar estimate is utility solar only and final chart includes behind the meter estimates of generation. The chart currently has official numbers to December 2020 and unofficial estimate for January 2021. The last point on the solar line will turn up when official January numbers come in. Other than that it should not change noticeably.
Between higher gas prices and a return to near normal consumption coal seems to have recovered to pre 2020 consumption.



Iain

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5519 on: February 25, 2021, 10:07:30 AM »
@Bee re. Constraint payments

"Curtailment almost doubled from 2019, at a cost of over a quarter of a billion pounds"

Meanwhile gas fired generation got DOUBLE that in a single month:

"UK gas plant assets earned GBP56.1 million ($77 million) in constraint payments in December, down 30% on November's record GBP80.2 million payout"

https://www.spglobal.com/platts/en/market-insights/latest-news/electric-power/020421-uk-gas-wind-power-generation-constraint-costs-dip-in-december


So what's with telling a half story Bee?
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BeeKnees

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5520 on: February 25, 2021, 10:17:28 AM »
So what's with telling a half story Bee?

Two reasons
Firstly  was trying to highlight that this will be used by certain outlets to bash renewables.  I believe Sizewell B was also paid significant sums to stay offline throughout the pandemic.

Secondly and on a more positive note, this is nearly 4TWh already available to either storage or with improved grid network enough electricity to provide power for 3 million people


I hadn't seen the gas figures, that's truly eyewatering, I guess 2020 has been a rather exceptional year.


Iain

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5521 on: February 25, 2021, 01:47:47 PM »
No problem, I got a little prickly there.

Generally constraint payments are in proportion to kWHs generated, regardless of source - dispatchable or intermittent. The grid capacity is the limiting factor

Though anti-renewables campaigners repeatedly tell a one -sided story, that Wind gets paid for "doing nothing" without mentioning dispatchable sources also get paid for "doing nothing"



"If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants." Isaac Newton

BeeKnees

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5522 on: February 25, 2021, 04:43:11 PM »
this is a fairly long interview with the CEO of Octopus energy who are breaking the mould of electricity supply in the UK with agile tariffs and V2G contracts.

https://www.cleaningup.live/episode-32-greg-jackson

Bodes well for the future of renewable energy in the UK.  Some of the takeaways, 
Those on agile tariff reduce electricty use at peak times by 70%.
The public are very willing to load shift in response to a pricing structure
If electricity companies don't make use of curtailed wind then Octopus are looking at building storage at local level to take advantage of the low/negative price at those times so they can sell it to the consumer when demand is higher. 
 


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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5523 on: February 26, 2021, 03:24:07 AM »
BNEF Global solar installations for 2021 between 141 GW and 209 GW. That is between 13% and nearly 50% increase from 2020. 209GW is up from 194 GW estimate a month ago.
China last year 52 GWdc last year to 65-75 GW this year.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5524 on: February 28, 2021, 12:37:56 AM »
U.S.
North Dakota Officials Block Wind Power In Effort To Save Coal
Quote
North Dakota has lots of coal. It also has strong and consistent winds. It might be the perfect spot to showcase the long-awaited "energy transition" from climate-warming fossil fuels to climate-saving renewables.

Yet that transition has hit a snag. Two counties in the state have enacted drastic restrictions on new wind projects in an attempt to save coal mining jobs, despite protests from landowners who'd like to rent their land to wind energy companies. It's a sign of how difficult that transition can be for communities that depend on coal for jobs and tax revenue. The economic benefits of wind power, even though substantial, often flow to different people. ... 
https://www.npr.org/2021/02/25/965775584/north-dakota-officials-block-wind-power-in-effort-to-save-coal
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gerontocrat

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5525 on: February 28, 2021, 01:17:05 AM »
Re Sigmetnows post - An easy way to end up with nothing for everyone.
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JD

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5526 on: February 28, 2021, 03:39:50 PM »
this is a fairly long interview with the CEO of Octopus energy who are breaking the mould of electricity supply in the UK with agile tariffs and V2G contracts.

https://www.cleaningup.live/episode-32-greg-jackson


Very inspiring interview, both for what it means for energy transition and for ideas for other industries.  Thanks for sharing!

BeeKnees

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5527 on: March 01, 2021, 01:31:34 AM »
Carbon tracker have done some analysis and found that low carbon storage and other measures are now a cheaper option than building new gas power plants.

https://carbontracker.org/reports/foot-off-the-gas/

Quote
• UK investment in new combined cycle gas plants for
this decade would be misguided. Our analysis shows that
a combination of clean energy sources and flexible technologies
is not only cheaper than the 14 GW of slated new gas plants
but also offers the same level of grid services. By investing
in new gas, investors are exposing themselves to
stranded asset risk of £9 billion ($13 billion). Annual
emissions savings from forgoing new gas plants are
also relevant at 24 million tonnes of CO2, equivalent
to 7% of total emissions in 2019, enabling the UK to
better meet its net zero emissions target by 2050.
• The case for Clean Energy Portfolios (CEPs), a
combination of clean energy sources and flexible
technologies, is strong across different demand
outcomes. We tested a model to manage peak and non-peak
demand across the year and, although the contribution of the
CEP resources changes, it is shown to be capable of providing
the same grid services as a gas plant. We performed a cost
sensitivity to key inputs to show that CEP economics
are robust. We find that a 25% cost reduction in
battery storage would bring the overall cost of a CEP
down by 12%. Costs in a CEP are mitigated by the least-cost
substitution which takes place unlike for gas, which is wholly
exposed to gas prices.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2021, 10:09:23 AM by BeeKnees »

BeeKnees

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5528 on: March 02, 2021, 10:14:10 AM »
Chinese national grid plan for power was released yesterday, called 'Carbon peak and carbon neutrality action plan,

Link is in Chinese but google translates fairly well
http://www.tanjiaoyi.com/article-33055-1.html

1000GW of new wind and solar by 2030, 80GW Nuclear. 


gerontocrat

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5529 on: March 02, 2021, 12:37:50 PM »
Having had a peek at the future from BeeKnees, here is a look at the here and now.

BAU rules, OK?

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/mar/02/fossil-fuel-emissions-in-danger-of-surpassing-pre-covid-levels
Fossil fuel emissions in danger of surpassing pre-Covid levels

International Energy Agency data shows steady climb over second half of 2020

Quote
The world has only a few months to prevent the energy industry’s carbon emissions from surpassing pre-pandemic levels this year as economies begin to rebound from Covid-19 restrictions, according to the International Energy Agency.

New figures from the global energy watchdog found that fossil fuel emissions climbed steadily over the second half of the year as major economies began to recover. By December 2020, carbon emissions were 2% higher than in the same month the year before.

The return of rising emissions began only months after Covid-19 triggered the deepest slump in carbon dioxide output since the end of the second world war, and threatens to dash hopes that the world’s emissions might have peaked in 2019.

The IEA was one of many influential groups to call on global governments to put in place plans to use green energy policies as an economic stimulus in the wake of the coronavirus crisis. However, a Guardian investigation revealed that only a small number of major countries began pumping rescue funds into low-carbon efforts such as renewable power, electric vehicles and energy efficiency last year.

The agency’s first ever report to record monthly carbon emissions by region found a strong correlation between countries that put in place economic stimulus packages with a net environmental benefit – such as France, Spain, the UK and Germany – and those that have kept a lid on the carbon emissions rebound.

Meanwhile, the countries that had made the smallest contributions to green economic stimulus measures, such as China, India, the United States and Brazil, recorded steep carbon rebounds in the second half of last year as their economies began to reopen.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5530 on: March 02, 2021, 05:15:06 PM »
...
Meanwhile, the countries that had made the smallest contributions to green economic stimulus measures, such as China, India, the United States and Brazil, recorded steep carbon rebounds in the second half of last year as their economies began to reopen.

Here in the U.S., the Biden administration’s Infrastructure Bill is next on the list, after the Covid Relief Bill. And the Democrats no longer give a fig about kowtowing to Republicans’ fossil-fuel-loving demands in Congress, if they can get legislation passed without those votes.
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

gerontocrat

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5531 on: March 02, 2021, 06:07:59 PM »
Here in the U.S., the Biden administration’s Infrastructure Bill is next on the list, after the Covid Relief Bill. And the Democrats no longer give a fig about kowtowing to Republicans’ fossil-fuel-loving demands in Congress, if they can get legislation passed without those votes.
One has to give the Fossil Fuel companies credit,
They will fight clean energy at the US Congress,
They will fight clean energy at the State Capitols,
They will fight clean energy at the City Halls,
They will fight clean energy at the Counties.
They will never surrender


https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/mar/01/a-texas-city-had-a-bold-new-climate-plan-until-a-gas-company-got-involved
A Texas city had a bold new climate plan – until a gas company got involved

The fossil fuel industry is using the same playbook to fight city climate plans around the country
Quote
When the city of Austin drafted a plan to shift away from fossil fuels, the local gas company was fast on the scene to try to scale back the ambition of the effort.

Like many cities across the US, the rapidly expanding and gentrifying Texas city is looking to shrink its climate footprint. So its initial plan was to virtually eliminate gas use in new buildings by 2030 and existing ones by 2040. Homes and businesses would have to run on electricity and stop using gas for heat, hot water and stoves.

The proposal, an existential threat to the gas industry, quickly caught the attention of Texas Gas Service. The company drafted line-by-line revisions to weaken the plan, asked customers to oppose it and escalated its concerns to top city officials.

The American Gas Association in a statement for this story said it “will absolutely oppose any effort to ban natural gas or sideline our infrastructure anywhere the effort materializes, state house or city steps”. But it argued that position is “not counter to environmental goals we all share”, and said “natural gas is key to achieving the cleaner energy future we all want”.

etc etc

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/feb/28/deb-haaland-confirmation-interior-secretary-fossil-fuels-climate
How Deb Haaland's confirmation bid became a 'proxy fight' over fossil fuels

Joe Biden’s progressive nominee for interior secretary faced harsh questions from lawmakers with deep industry ties

Quote
the battle lines between the fossil fuel industry and the activists and environmentalists opposed to it have been starkly drawn in the fight for Haaland’s nomination.

John Barrasso, a Wyoming Republican who has received nearly $1.2m from oil and gas companies and their employees in his time in the Senate, said he was “troubled by many of [Haaland’s] radical views” and scolded her over a tweet in which she said Republicans didn’t believe in science. Senator Steve Daines, a Montana Republican, said he was “deeply concerned” over Haaland’s “radical” support for Joe Biden’s pausing of oil and gas drilling on public land, neglecting to mention his campaign had taken $288,500 from these industries in just the past five years.

Bill Cassidy, a Louisiana Republican who has over his Senate career accepted nearly $1.7m from oil and gas interests, pointedly asked Haaland: “Will your administration be guided by a prejudice against fossil fuel, or will it be guided by science?” while Utah’s Mike Lee, who blamed protections placed on Bears Ears, an area of the state important to Native Americans, for “impoverishing” locals, has taken in $366,000 from oil and gas during his Senate tenure.

"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

gerontocrat

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5532 on: March 02, 2021, 06:12:44 PM »
Chinese national grid plan for power was released yesterday, called 'Carbon peak and carbon neutrality action plan,

Link is in Chinese but google translates fairly well
http://www.tanjiaoyi.com/article-33055-1.html

1000GW of new wind and solar by 2030, 80GW Nuclear.
A bit more easily accessible detail from a Reuters article
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-climatechange-renewables-idUSKBN2AA0BA
China plans to raise minimum renewable power purchase to 40% by 2030: government document
Quote
BEIJING (Reuters) - China will force regional grid firms to buy at least 40% of power from non-fossil fuel sources by 2030 in order to meet the country’s climate targets, according to a new government document seen by Reuters.

Grid companies will steadily increase the amount of power purchased from clean generation sources from 28.2% in 2020 to 40% by 2030, according to a draft policy from the National Energy Administration (NEA), verified by a person with direct knowledge of the matter.

President Xi Jinping pledged last year to make China “carbon neutral” by 2060, and said in December it would boost the share of non-fossil fuels in primary energy consumption to around 25% by 2030 from a previous commitment of 20%.

“To ensure President Xi’s climate targets...(China) will set more stringent targets for non-fossil fuel consumption,” the NEA document said.

Power procured from non-hydropower renewable sources will reach a minimum of 25.9% by 2030, up from 10.8% last year, according to the draft plan, which has been opened up for consultation with stakeholders until Feb. 26.

The targets suggest China will rely on solar and wind to meet its renewable goals, and move away from the construction boom of large-scale hydroelectric projects in recent years.

In December, Xi also said that China will boost its installed capacity of wind and solar power to more than 1,200 gigawatts (GW) by 2030.

The targets set out in the NEA document are based on estimates that China’s total power consumption will reach 11 trillion kilowatt-hours and primary energy consumption will hit 6 billion tonnes of standard coal equivalent by 2030, according to the policy draft.

The NEA did not immediately respond to Reuters’ request for comment.

China’s renewable energy law compels local grid firms to “fully acquire” all power generated by renewable sources.

But grids have been accused of prioritising coal-fired power, and inadequate transmission capacity has also hindered the uptake of renewables.

China built 38.4 gigawatts (GW) of new coal-fired power capacity in 2020, more than three times the rest of the world.

However, China’s utilities including China Huadian Corp, China Huaneng Group and State Power Investment Corp (SPIC), have promised to improve their clean energy portfolio.
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5533 on: March 08, 2021, 03:53:01 PM »
Tesla Is Plugging a Secret Mega-Battery Into the Texas Grid
The utility-scale battery located outside of Houston will connect to the same grid that faltered in February’s freeze
Quote
Elon Musk is getting into the Texas power market, with previously unrevealed construction of a gigantic battery connected to an ailing electric grid that nearly collapsed last month. The move marks Tesla Inc.’s first major foray into the epicenter of the U.S. energy economy.

A Tesla subsidiary registered as Gambit Energy Storage LLC is quietly building a more than 100 megawatt energy storage project in Angleton, Texas, a town roughly 40 miles south of Houston. A battery that size could power about 20,000 homes on a hot summer day. Workers at the site kept equipment under cover and discouraged onlookers, but a Tesla logo could be seen on a worker’s hard hat and public documents helped confirm the company’s role.

The battery-storage system being built by Tesla’s Gambit subsidiary is registered with Ercot. Warren Lasher, senior director of system planning at Ercot, said the project has a proposed commercial operation date of June 1. The site is adjacent to a Texas-New Mexico Power substation.

Musk’s focus on Texas comes as the dominant U.S. energy hub—with its abundant natural gas, oil, solar and wind resources—is being transformed by the surging growth of renewables. For more than a century the Texas grid has transported power from large plants to customers over miles of transmission lines. The recent storms have highlighted just how fragile that legacy system is in the era of climate change. With the build out of giant batteries like those made by Tesla’s Gambit project and others, the state’s power grid could be remade around distributed generation that may prove more resilient.

About 2,100 megawatts of battery storage and 37,000 megawatts of solar and wind are in advanced stages of connecting to Ercot’s grid. “It’s not only stunning but the financing is already in place,” Jigar Shah said on March 2, a day before the clean-energy pioneer was named as director of the U.S. Energy Department’s loan finance office.

The Gambit project is not hard to find in Angleton, a small town of roughly 3,000 people in the middle of the Brazoria National Wildlife Refuge. But people on the construction site appear to have instructions to avoid drawing attention or answering questions from passersby. A photographer who attempted to observe from the front gate was told by a worker that it was a “secretive project.” White sheets obscured what appeared to be Tesla’s modular Megapacks.

In Texas, Albert said, it’s common for developers in real estate or energy to begin projects with several potential partners or purchasers waiting in the wings. It made sense to him that the project ended up with the state’s biggest billionaire. “Elon Musk has a lot of activity in Texas right now,” said Albert. “It wouldn’t surprise me if Musk is thinking about starting his own power company.”
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2021-03-08/tesla-is-plugging-a-secret-mega-battery-into-the-texas-grid
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5534 on: March 11, 2021, 03:38:53 PM »
Drones used in search and rescue trials at a North Sea wind farm
Quote
A range of tests using drones at a wind farm in the North Sea have been completed, offering another glimpse of how the technology could have an important role to play in the renewables sector.

The tests were carried out at the 309 megawatt Rentel offshore wind farm by DEME Offshore and Sabca, a Belgian aerospace firm.

According to an announcement from DEME Offshore earlier this week, the trial focused on several areas including turbine inspections, environmental surveys and parcel deliveries.

One part of the pilot involved an automated drone being deployed to carry out a search and rescue demonstration, in which it used infrared detection to locate its target before dropping a life buoy into the sea.

“We are convinced that these innovative, advanced technologies, which focus on fully autonomous operations without the need for any vessels and people offshore, have a game-changing potential to increase safety, lower the impact on the environment in the O&M phase of a project and reduce the overall costs,” Bart De Poorter, general manager at DEME Offshore, said in a statement. The term “O&M” refers to operations and maintenance. ... 
https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/11/drones-used-in-search-and-rescue-trials-at-a-north-sea-wind-farm.html
People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.

kassy

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5535 on: March 11, 2021, 07:15:24 PM »
Climate change: 'Default effect' sees massive green energy switch

When Swiss energy companies made green electricity the default choice, huge numbers of consumers were happy to stick with it - even though it cost them more.

Four years after the switch, researchers found that around 80% of customers were still on green tariffs.

This "default effect" happened partly because people didn't want the hassle of switching back to fossil fuels.

The authors say the idea could have a big impact on global emissions of CO2.

In the study, the researchers looked at what happened when two Swiss energy suppliers changed the default electricity offering for their customers from a mixture of fuels to renewables only.

This change affected around 234,000 private households and 9,000 businesses.

Before the switch, the numbers choosing to have green power were at around 3%. Afterwards, this rose to 80-90% of customers.

Residential consumers had to pay at least 3-8% more for their energy on the green tariff, while businesses saw their costs increase by up to 14% for energy used at night.

Remarkably, these extra costs weren't enough to push consumers to change their tariffs back to ones with fossil fuels in the mix.

"It is worth noting that even five years after the change, some 80% of the households are still sticking with green electricity," said co-author Dr Jennifer Gewinner, from ETH Zurich, a public research university in Switzerland's largest city.

It was a similar story for small business customers. Several years after the switch, more than 70% were still on the more expensive green tariff.

In the case of large companies, which had considerable choice in terms of which energy provider to go with, the vast majority stayed with green energy even though it was costing them around $2,300 extra per year.

The researchers believe that what they are observing is the surprising power of the default effect.

This is a widely known phenomenon in different spheres, such as in organ donation, where laws have changed in many countries so that the people have to opt out if they don't want to donate after death.

...

As well as people's inherent reluctance to tackle the paperwork involved in changing back to fossil fuels, there were other factors at play.

"People are a bit overwhelmed because it is a hard topic to actually feel competent to choose your own tariff," said Dr Gewinner.

"So if you help them and tell them we are all moving now to renewable energy, they feel okay. It was kind of what they wanted to do anyway.

"I think that's what makes default settings stick so much, because we understand that it's the recommended product, like the safe choice."

...

"We made a simulation for Germany with data from 2018," explained Prof Diekmann.

"We figured out that when all companies would do it only for their private customers, the saving was 45 million metric tonnes of carbon dioxide. That's a big impact, equal to about 5% of all the CO2 emissions in Germany."

But would this idea work if every energy supplier offered a green default - is there enough green energy to go around?

"The companies we work with, they were also afraid that they would need more renewable energy than they were able to support," said Dr Gewinner.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-56361970

Interesting idea. We should do this when supply of renewables allows it.
Þetta minnismerki er til vitnis um að við vitum hvað er að gerast og hvað þarf að gera. Aðeins þú veist hvort við gerðum eitthvað.

NeilT

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5536 on: March 11, 2021, 08:29:47 PM »
It might work in Germany and Switzerland but the energy markets are different in different countries.

There are over 60 energy providers in the UK. So many that we have comparison websites which you can sign up to and they will tell you regularly which tariff is the best for you.

Then there are sites like lookaftermybills.com in the UK who literally research you plan options and automatically switch your energy plan to the latest offer.  When that offer expires, it will do the same again.

In such an advanced consumer environment, I can't see any way that a "green" plan which costs significantly more money, would ever even be seen by the consumer.  You may put them on the "green" plan on day one, but will be switched off that plan, potentially within a month, using your plan management provider.

We need an answer which allows people to positively choose green energy, rather than foist it on them by stealth and expect inertia to keep it that way.
Being right too soon is socially unacceptable.

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Sigmetnow

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5537 on: March 11, 2021, 09:27:56 PM »
It might work in Germany and Switzerland but the energy markets are different in different countries.

There are over 60 energy providers in the UK. So many that we have comparison websites which you can sign up to and they will tell you regularly which tariff is the best for you.

Then there are sites like lookaftermybills.com in the UK who literally research you plan options and automatically switch your energy plan to the latest offer.  When that offer expires, it will do the same again.

In such an advanced consumer environment, I can't see any way that a "green" plan which costs significantly more money, would ever even be seen by the consumer.  You may put them on the "green" plan on day one, but will be switched off that plan, potentially within a month, using your plan management provider.

We need an answer which allows people to positively choose green energy, rather than foist it on them by stealth and expect inertia to keep it that way.

Easy.  Add a check box to the sign-up screen, “I prefer green energy,” that will give them the cheapest green energy plan.
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BeeKnees

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5538 on: March 11, 2021, 10:11:24 PM »
Green plans in the UK don't cost significantly more, so it's not an issue. 


NeilT

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5539 on: March 12, 2021, 12:22:49 PM »
Correct me if I'm wrong but the gist of the whole thing was enrol them up to a more expensive green plan then inertia would keep them there.

It wouldn't matter if it cost a few £ more with the UK switching sites, they would switch you off green energy unless it was the cheapest.

Certainly, Sig, having a choice to choose green would avoid that.  However that will take time to set up and the user will be bombarded with "you chose to pay more for  your energy, are you sure", even if they chose to check green only.

I still think a compelling plan which meets or beats the best FF plan out there is the best approach for the UK.  People will then switch automatically and nobody will try to switch them back.  Of course it will require a tariff regime which builds in the carbon cost of the FF energy and that is not a vote winner.

More work on this one.
Being right too soon is socially unacceptable.

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BeeKnees

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5540 on: March 12, 2021, 12:35:15 PM »
Correct me if I'm wrong but the gist of the whole thing was enrol them up to a more expensive green plan then inertia would keep them there.

It wouldn't matter if it cost a few £ more with the UK switching sites, they would switch you off green energy unless it was the cheapest.

Certainly, Sig, having a choice to choose green would avoid that.  However that will take time to set up and the user will be bombarded with "you chose to pay more for  your energy, are you sure", even if they chose to check green only.

I still think a compelling plan which meets or beats the best FF plan out there is the best approach for the UK.  People will then switch automatically and nobody will try to switch them back.  Of course it will require a tariff regime which builds in the carbon cost of the FF energy and that is not a vote winner.

More work on this one.

Go on any UK price comparison site today and you will find the majority of the cheapest energy deals offer green electricity. 
I tried two sites yesterday and the cheapest 6 were all renewable on both sites .

The issue is more those not switching than those that are.  The top 5 electricity suppliers never appear in the cheapest deals on these sites (British Gas, OVO E.On, EDF, Scottish power), yet they serve 15m customers.

The rate at which Octopus and Bulb are growing means they will soon be breaking into that top 5, having already overtaken NPower.

Iain

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5541 on: March 12, 2021, 02:59:50 PM »
Symbio Low Fair and Green  was the cheapest for me.

I'd be wary of some comparison sites - some compare only those suppliers who pay to be on the site.

Customers are not shown the best deal available and end up paying over the odds - to cover the cost of the supplier being marketed at them

Try Martin Lewis if you want to see the WHOLE market
https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/

"If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants." Isaac Newton

Iain

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5542 on: March 12, 2021, 03:01:43 PM »
Nudge theory - same reason nearly every uk worker is now in a pension scheme, you have to actively opt out.

Richard Thaler won a Nobel Prize for it:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-41549753
"If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants." Isaac Newton

gerontocrat

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5543 on: March 15, 2021, 08:03:59 PM »
https://www.iea.org/reports/monthly-electricity-statistics.
IEA Electricity data to Dec 20 update

NOTE These graphs are all in 12 month moving averages, so any large drops (seasonal, covid etc) tend to be smoothed away. The advantage is that as noice is removed underlying trends should be easier to discern

OECD+CHINA+INDIA

The first image is to cheer you up. An 80% increase in wind+solar electricity generation in 4 years (Dec 16 to Dec 20 12 month trailing averages)

But the next images put that in perspective. In numbers, in those 4 years
- the wind+solar share of electricity generation has increased from 7.7% to 11.3% in those 4 years, an increase of 81 thousand GWH per month.
- total electricity generation has increased by 114 thousand GWH per month, i.e. 33 thousand GWH per month in excess of that growth in wind+solar.
- only 3 thousand GWH of the gap has been filled by increased generastion from cola+oil+natural gas
- the other 30 thousand GWH has come from increased generation from nuclear and hydro (mainly by China).

Click images to enlarge Also see next post...

"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
"Damn, I wanted to see what happened next" (Epitaph)

gerontocrat

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5544 on: March 15, 2021, 08:13:43 PM »
https://www.iea.org/reports/monthly-electricity-statistics.
IEA Electricity data to Dec 20 update

NOTE These graphs are all in 12 month moving averages, so any large drops (seasonal, covid etc) tend to be smoothed away. The advantage is that as noice is removed underlying trends should be easier to discern

Some more graphs...

USA - use of coal has stopped reducing

CHINA - Growth has resumed - covid downturn barely a blip

INDIA - significant 2020 downturn still not fully recovered.

All OECD - generation still reducing. Mabe I will look at OECD without the USA to see if the profile is very different.

Click images to enlarge
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
"And that's all I'm going to say about that". Forrest Gump
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gerontocrat

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5545 on: March 15, 2021, 08:28:17 PM »
So here it is
"Para a Causa do Povo a Luta Continua!"
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vox_mundi

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5546 on: March 15, 2021, 10:17:03 PM »
Modular Solar Generators Could Be Key In Helping Power Remote Bases During A Major Conflict
https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/39668/modular-solar-generators-could-be-key-in-helping-power-remote-bases-during-a-major-conflict

As it is now, fuel needs are one of the most significant logistical challenges for sustained military operations. A typical U.S. Army combat brigade has between 3,000 and 5,000 individuals, hundreds of vehicles, as well as equipment and infrastructure to support those assets.

... The cost of transporting fuel to its endpoint also adds significantly to the cost-per-gallon the Department of Defense pays for fuel. In 2015, the DOD was paying between $25 and $35 a gallon for fuel supplied from Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar to forward operating bases in Iraq and Syria.

... As an example of what might soon be deployed, one Poland-based company, MOVEit.tech, has developed highly modular mobile units designed specifically for armed forces applications.



Aside from uses aimed at expeditionary military use, the company also intends their modular solar units to be used for applications such as irrigation, humanitarian aid, construction sites, and remote oil and gas exploration.

MOVEit.tech’s smallest unit, the SunBOX 35a, can produce up to 13.5kW at peak output. One of the most common diesel generators used by the DOD, the MEP-12A, by contrast, can produce output upwards of 700kW, but consumes around 55 gallons of fuel per hour.

Clearly, any larger installation depending on these mobile solar plants would require multiple units. Still, eliminating some of the need to transport and constantly be resupplied with gobs of fuel could make such mobile solar units a viable, if not a critical option for expeditionary energy needs. [... maybe fewer wars might help?]

https://www.power-moveit.tech/2019/11/22/off-grid-power-generation/



MOVEit.tech is far from the only group that is developing solar energy harvesting technologies aimed at armed forces use cases. Companies such as Simpliphi Power, OK Solar, and SunWize are all developing systems intended specifically for military expeditionary forces.

https://simpliphipower.com/deployments/military-law-enforcement/fob/expeditionary-marine-corps-and-u-s-army/

https://www.oksolar.com/lion/Item/359575/military-solar-powered-shipping-container

https://www.sunwize.com/application-item/defense-military/
“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ― Leonardo da Vinci

Insensible before the wave so soon released by callous fate. Affected most, they understand the least, and understanding, when it comes, invariably arrives too late

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  • Nilas ice
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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5547 on: March 16, 2021, 02:29:22 AM »
Discussion began in Oil and Gas thread. Of all the complex changes facing hydropower changes in capacity factors if any are not and will not be a significant factor. This is contrary to rethinkx thesis. I expect hydro to be used more for balancing daily demand in the future but that change will be limited and driven more by a push to sell higher priced power in the early morning and evening than being undercut by solar or wind. I know some would prefer more concise responses but I tend to ramble on.
I have toured many hydro facilities in the US though more in the Northwest. Public tours of these places were discontinued after 9/11. While some of these tours were with groups of twenty or so many were with fewer than five and a few were just for me. I toured a fish hatchery and coaxed eggs from a fish and fertilized them. I was able to see the clever fish bypass that allows a human operator to count fish species and determine whether they are natural or hatcher grown while they swim upstream. I have been lowered in a basket into the turbine chamber to walk on and inspect a turbine blade, I seen and discussed operations of dam controls built before 1900. I toured major dam control upgrades in progress. I spent some time discussing generation decisions with one of the operators responsible for those decisions on a daily basis.
From my discussions with that operator I learned several things. In the Northwest US fish are the first priority. In reality that means during spring fish migration up river flow levels must be maintained even if it draws down the pool at a time when it should be filling. River flow levels are ramped up and down not adjusted quickly. Overall flow rates are not allowed to change more than a certain percentage per hour and a certain percentage per day. This protects the fish from being stranded. Minimum flow rates during all seasons must be maintained as well. Spring flow rates must be high to allow mature fish to return to spawning grounds while flow during other seasons allows growing fish to survive to maturity. When all of the impacts are considered including climate change a properly managed dam may be a net benefit to fish. This considers the benefits of money for fish programs such as habitat restoration, studies to identify populations and problems and maintaining flow during climate driven increasing drought.  Other priorities of dams include flood control and maintaining enough water for cities and irrigation. The last priority on the list is electric power production.
BPA operates dams along the Columbia River representing the largest share of hydropower in the northwest. BPA will join the western energy imbalance market in 2022. When it does more hydro will be available for balancing daily demand in the western US. As mentioned below much hydro is available to balance electricity demand but that fraction changes.
With all these competing priorities hydro provides the majority of power in Washington State and large quantities of power for Idaho and Oregon. It also provides about half of the daily power needed to deal with California’s roughly 10 gw solar peak. Currently the other half is provided by NG peaker turbines. With California’s solar mandate on new construction and improving solar economics I expect demand for power to fill the worsening duck curve to increase. Thankfully the economics of batteries have improved enough that this increased demand will probably be filled by batteries and not NG.

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  • Nilas ice
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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5548 on: March 16, 2021, 05:35:02 AM »
February US natural gas use lowest since April 2018.

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Re: Renewable Energy
« Reply #5549 on: March 16, 2021, 06:38:08 AM »
Iron redox flow battery promises to store power at €0.05/kWh
https://www.pv-magazine.com/2021/03/15/iron-redox-flow-battery-promises-to-store-power-at-e0-05-kwh/
They are working to develop 8 kwh battery now.